J.D. Meier's Blog

Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

March, 2014

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    7 Days of Agile Results: A Time Management Boot Camp for Productivity on Fire

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    An amazing thing happens when you become more focused and productive ...

    You get more out of life.

    It’s like you have 27 hours out of the day, while everyone else has 24, and they spend 8 of them sleeping, while you spend them dreaming of what’s to come next.

    Too many folks have too much to do with too little time and they can't keep up.

    We don't necessarily learn great time management skills in school or on the job, and we don't necessarily learn how to really blend our time, energy, and action to produce our best results.

    That's where Agile Results steps in.

    Agile Results it the underlying approach showcased in my best-selling book on time management, Getting Results the Agile Way.

    It's a simple system for meaningful results.  It helps you cut through the clutter to get to what matters, and to use your best energy for your best work.  I put Agile Results together over a period of 10 years while testing principles, patterns, and practices that push the envelope in terms of high-performance, extreme productivity, work-life balance, stress management, and well-being.

    Here’s What You Get by Using Agile Results:

    1. Proven practices to master time management, motivation, and personal productivity
    2. Discover the one way to stack the deck in your favor that’s authentic and works
    3. How to embrace change and get better results in any situation
    4. How to focus and direct your attention with skill
    5. How to use your strengths to create a powerful edge for getting results
    6. How to change a habit and make it stick
    7. How to never miss the things that matter most, and achieve better work-life balance
    8. How to spend more time doing the things you love

    The 7 Day Boot Camp for Agile Results

    I put together a simple time management book camp to help you just start using Agile Results.

    For some case studies, stories, and testimonials see http://gettingresults.com/wiki/Testimonials.

    If you need more depth beyond the 7 day time management book camp, then check out:

    And, of course, there’s always the book:

    If you’re already an Agile Results master, share this post and help somebody else set their productivity on fire.  Help friends, family, and colleagues reach a new level of awesome.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    10 Big Ideas from XYZ

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    I’m trying out a new way to do book reviews, to share more value in a better, faster, and easier way, with a predictable experience.  

    My new approach is to focus on 10 big ideas.

    Here’s an example:

    10 Big Ideas from BRIEF

    Side note – BRIEF is a powerful book with hard-core techniques for getting to the point and cutting through fluff.  If you struggle with being verbose, or rambling, this book will help you master the art of “Lean Communication.”

    In my book reviews in the past, I shared the challenges the book solved, the structure of the book, and some “scenes” from the book, sort of like a “movie trailer.”   While that was effective in terms of really doing a book justice, I thought there was room for improvement.

    I figured, Sources of Insight is all about, well, “insight.”   So then my best approach would be to focus on the big ideas in the books I read, and share that unique value in a simple to consume fashion.   I considered “3 Big Ideas” and “5 Big Ideas”, but they both seemed too small.  And more than 10 seemed too big.

    10 Big Ideas seems like a healthy dose of insights to draw from a book.

    I had actually considered this approach a long time ago, but I was worried that it would water things down too much.  Instead, I’m finding that it’s doing the exact opposite.  Using 10 Big Ideas as a constraint is a great forcing function to help me really synthesize and distill the essence of a book, and to really hone in on the most valuable takeaways.  

    And it’s a great way to turn insight into action in a very repeatable way.

    I already read and review books at a fast pace, but I think this new approach is going to help me get even better and faster at rapidly sharing insight and action.

    I’m in the early stages, so if you have ideas or feedback on the 10 Big Ideas approach for my book reviews, please let me know.

    Take 10 Big Ideas from BRIEF for a spin.  Kick the tires.   It will be worth your time.  If you master Big Idea #7, alone, you'll be ahead of the game when it comes to making your pitch, or presenting your ideas.

    Lean Communication can be your differentiator in a noisy, crowded, information overloaded world.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Satya Nadella on How the Key To Longevity is To Be a Learning Organization

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    Everything should be a startup.

    Unless you’re a learning organization that actually uses what you learn to leapfrog ahead.

    But the paradox is you can’t hold on too tightly to what you’ve learned in the past.  You have to be able to let things go.  Quickly.  And, you have to learn new things fast.  And, if you can create a learning organization with tight feedback loops, that’s the key to longevity.

    Adapt or die.

    But the typical challenge in a big organization, is rejecting the new, and embracing the old.   And that’s how the giants, the mighty fall.

    Here is how Satya Nadella told us how to think about what longevity means in our business

    “What does longevity mean in this business? Longevity in this business means, that you somehow take the core competency you have but start learning how to express it in different forms.

    And that to me is the core strength.

    It's not the manifestation in one product generation, or in one specific feature, or what have you, but if you culturally, right, if you sort of look at what excites me from an organizational capacity building, ... it's that learning ... the ability to be able to learn new things ... and have those new things actually accrue to what we have done in the past ...  or what we have done in the past accrues to new learnings ... and that feedback cycle is the only way I can see scale mattering in this business ... otherwise, quite frankly you would say, everything should be a startup ... everything should be a startup ... you would have a success, you would unwind, and everything should be a startup ... and if you're going to have a large organization, it better be a learning organization that knows how to take all the learning that it's had today and make it relevant in the future knowing that you'll have to unlearn everything, and that's the paradox of this business and I think that's what I want us to be going for.”

    In my experience, if you don’t know where to start, a great place to start is get feedback.  If you don’t know who to get feedback from, then ask yourself, your organization, who do you serve?   Ask the customers or clients that you serve.

    But balance what you learn with vision.  And balance it with analytics and insight on behaviors and actions.   Customers, and people in general, can say one thing, but do another, or ask for one thing, but mean something entirely different. 

    Remember the words of Henry Ford:

    “If I'd asked customers what they wanted, they would have said ‘a faster horse’.”

    Expressing pains, needs, opportunities, and desired outcomes leaves a lot of room for interpretation.

    Drive with vision, build better feedback loops, interpret well, and learn well, to survive and thrive in an ever-changing world.

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Satya Nadella on How Success is a Mental Game

    • 0 Comments

    As technology and software change our world at a faster rate than ever before, we need to play a better game.

    How do we play a better game?

    By recognizing our conceptual blocks and removing them.

    Here is how Satya Nadella told us to think about our mental game and conceptual blocks:

    “It's really a mental game.

    At this point, it's got nothing to do with your capability, at all.  You're going to be facing stuff that you never faced before and it's all in the head.  The question is how are you going to cope with it.  It's all a conceptual block. 

    And if we can get rid of that, things get a lot easier.

    You've got to really think about the conceptual block you have, be mindful of it, and remove it.

    And then you can have a different perspective.”

    When we change our perspective, we change our game.

    That’s how we win, in work and in life.

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