J.D. Meier's Blog

Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Change the World by Changing Behaviors

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    If you have an understanding of types of behavior change, you can design more effective software.

    Software is a powerful way to change the world.

    You can change the world with software, a behavior at a time.

    Think of all the little addictive loops, that shape our habits and thoughts on a daily basis. We’re gradually being automated and programmed by the apps we use.

    I’ve seen some people spiral down, a click, a status update, a notification, or a reminder at a time. I’ve seen others spiral up by using apps that teach them new habits, reinforce their good behaviors, and bring out their best.

    To bottom line is, whether you are shaping software or using software on a regular basis, it helps to have a deep understanding of behavior change. You can use this know-how to change your personal habits, lead change management efforts, or build software that changes the world.

    We know change is tough, and it’s a complicated topic, so where do you start?

    A great place to start is to learn the 15 types of behavior change, thanks to Dr. BJ Fogg and his Fogg Behavior Grid.   No worries.  15 sounds like a lot, but it’s actually easy once you understand the model behind it.  It’s simple and intuitive.

    The basic frame works like this.   You figure out whether the behavior change is to do a new behavior, a familiar behavior, increase the behavior, decrease the behavior, or stop dong the behavior.   Within that, you figure out the duration, as in, is this a one-time deal, or is it for a specific time period, or is it something you want to do permanently.

    Here are some examples from Dr. BJ Fogg’s Behavior Grid:

    Do New Behavior

    • Install solar panels on house.
    • Carpool to work for three weeks.
    • Start growing own vegetables.

    Do Familiar Behavior

    • Tell a friend about eco-friendly soap.
    • Bike to work for two months.
    • Turn off lights when leaving room.

    Increase Behavior

    • Plant more trees and local plants.
    • Take public bus for one month.
    • Purchase more local produce.

    Decrease Behavior

    • Buy fewer boxes of bottled water.
    • Take shorter showers this week.
    • Eat less meat from now on.

    Stop Doing a Behavior

    • Turn off space heater for tonight.
    • Don't water lawn during Summer.
    • Never litter again.

    When you know the type of behavior change you’re trying to make, you can design more effective change strategies.

    If you want to change the world, focus on changing behaviors.  If you want to change your world, focus on changing your behaviors. (And, remember, thoughts are behaviors, too.)

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    Best-Selling Author on Mental Toughness

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    I’m honored to have a guest post by Jason Selk, Ed.D., on patterns and practices for mental toughness.  Jason is the best-selling author of 10-Minute Toughness and Executive Toughness.  As a trainer of executives, world-class athletes, and business leaders, Jason shares proven practices for mental toughness.  

    Jason is a rock-star in the mental toughness arena in business and in sports.  He is a regular contributor to ABC, CBS, ESPN, and NBC radio and television and he has been featured in USA Today, Men’s Health, Muscle and Fitness, Shape and Self Magazine.

    Mental toughness is what gets you back on your feet again.  Mental toughness is what helps you keep your cool when a bunch of hot air blows your way.  Mental toughness is the stuff that unsung heroes are made of.  Mental toughness is the breakfast of champions.  The beauty is that you can learn and leverage the same proven practices that work for business and for life.

    I think of the tools that Jason shares as the fundamentals.   They may sound like common sense, and yet, they are the ways the work.  The trick is not just knowing what to do, but doing what you know.  I find it much easier to do something that I can believe in, and what I like about Jason’s patterns and practices for mental toughness is that they are tested in action, and they stand the test of time.

    Check out Jason’s post on patterns and practices for mental toughness and get results.

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    Video–Ed Jezierski on Getting Results the Agile Way

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    It’s always great to see how technology can help make the world a better place.

    You might remember Ed Jezierski from his Microsoft days.  In his early years at Microsoft, he worked on the Microsoft Developer Support team, helping customers succeed on the platform.    These early experiences taught Ed the value of teamwork and collaboration, extreme customer focus, and the value of principles, patterns, and proven practices for addressing recurring issues, and building more robust designs.

    From there, Ed was one of the early members of the patterns & practices team.  As one of the first Program Managers on the patterns & practices team, Ed was the driving force behind many of the first guides from patterns & practices for developers, including the Data Access guide, and the early Application Architecture guide.  He was also the master mind behind the first application blocks (Exception Management Block, Data Access Block, Caching Block, etc.) , which forever changed the destiny of patterns & practices.  The application blocks helped transition patterns & practices from an IT and system administrator focus,  to a focus on developers and solution architects.  In his role as an Architect, on the patterns & practices team, Ed played a significant role in shaping the technical strategy and orchestrating key design and engineering issues across the patterns & practices portfolio.  One of his most significant impacts was the early design and shaping  of the Microsoft Enterprise Library.

    In his later years, Ed worked on incubation and innovation teams, where he learned a lot about streamlining innovation, making things happen, and how to create systems and processes to support innovation, in a more organic and agile way, to balance more formal engineering practices for bringing ideas and innovation to market.

    But, just like James Bond, “the world is not enough.”  Ed’s passion was always for helping people around the world in a grand scale.  His strength and amazing skill is applying technology to change the world and making the world a better place, by solving solve real-world problems.  (I still remember the day, Ed showed up in his bullet proof armor, ready to deploy technology in some of the most dangerous places in the world.)

    Now, as CTO at InSTEDD, Ed hops around the globe helping communities everywhere design and use technology to continuously improve their health, safety and development.  As you can imagine, Ed has to make things happen in some of the most extreme scenarios, responding to natural disasters and health incidents.  And he uses Getting Results the Agile Way as a system for driving results for himself and the teams he leads.

    Here is Ed Jezierski on Getting Results the Agile Way …

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    The Power of Learning Docs

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    The key to effective knowledge management is to throw away documents.   You can’t get attached to what you write down.  Otherwise, you can’t learn and it won’t evolve.   But there is a trick …

    You throw away the document, not the learning.

    I learned this the hard way.   Several years back, I was trying to rewrite a document that had a bunch of gems, mired among bad ideas and bad writing.   It was the equivalent of spaghetti code.   It was hard to figure out what was the insight, what was the action, and what was just interesting information, but not critical path.

    It Often Takes Longer to Reshape than to Start Over

    I spent close to 40 hours trying to rewrite it.   Granted it was a long document, but at some point I had to ask myself, which was faster – re-writing it, or starting over?   Eventually, I realized, the right answer was to start over.

    So I started with a blank document.   And then I carried over the gems, and elaborated from there.  Within 8 hours, I was done with the finished document.

    The big lesson I learned was how difficult it actually is to reshape something that’s off, especially when it comes to written information.   Since this was prescriptive guidance, it had to be relevant, actionable, and timely.   It had to be insanely useful.   And to do that requires a lot of manipulating words and phrases until the bright ideas compile into actionable guidance with conceptual integrity.

    Throwing Away Documents is Hard if You are Attached

    But “throwing away” a document was tough.

    At least, it was tough until I realized that all the document really was, was a learning doc.   It was a place to experiment and put ideas down on paper and bounce them off of other people, and get the collective perspective.   The problem was, this learning doc, wasn’t the same as a bunch of notes.  It was meant to be the final document.  It was on path to be so.  

    But, along the way, what I failed to realize is that it baked in a bunch of our learnings.

    It didn’t yet reflect creative synthesis, or distillation.

    It was more like a trail up the mountain, and we were still on our way up.

    Throw Away Documents, But Carry Forward Lessons Learned

    I had a conversation with John Socha, the guy behind Norton Commander.  I explained the challenge of producing useful documents, and how our learnings get in the way, if we don’t let the documents go.   Surprisingly, he said to me, “Exactly!”

    He continued and basically said that it’s the mistake a lot of people make.  They hold on to their documents long past their usefulness, and don’t let the documents go, but carry the learnings forward.

    I don’t know what painful lessons John had gone through to learn that, but at the time, it was fresh on my mind, and it had cost me 40+ hours of trial and error to move a document forward to learn that vital lesson.

    Fresh Docs Help You Express Ideas More Clearly

    You need to be able to throw documents away to create something better in its place. 

    When it’s pen and paper, it’s easier to throw something in the trash bin.   But, when it’s a digital document it’s, it’s easy to forget what it feels like to start fresh.   You don’t lose something.   You gain something.  It’s whitespace, where you are free and able to express things more clearly, now that you have more clarity.

    Whitespace loves creative synthesis and distilled ideas.

    It’s a breeding ground for new ways of expressing what you now know that you have climbed further up the mountain.   If the path before you is riddled with your previous learnings, it can tough to see how to pave your way ahead, or worse, how to make a cleaner path for others to follow, which, after all, is the point of the knowledge and information you are attempting to share.

    Learning Docs Are Your Friend

    They are you friend.   If you let them go.

    They come in all shapes and sizes.   They may even resemble raw notes.   What’s important is that you acknowledge that they are just that.   They are learning docs and you need to be free to throw them away and start from scratch at any point in time.

    This is fundamental to creating a relevant, actionable, and timely document set that helps your users climb the mountain.

    This is especially important when it comes to collaborating on documents.   In fact, that’s exactly where I first learned this lesson, and spent 40 hours trying to fix an 8 hour document.

    Versions + Boneyards Help You Throw Away More Effectively

    Once I learned that lesson, I had to find ways to incrementally and iteratively evolve documents as a team (or by myself.)   I adopted some simple conventions.   One convention that served me well is to version documents in the title:  MyDocument – v1, MyDocument – v2, MyDocument – v3, etc.

    It takes judgment when to decide it’s worth calling the document a new version, but it also helps to let things go from one version to the next.

    Another practice that has worked well for learning docs is to have a Boneyard section at the end of the document.   Literally, a dumping ground at the bottom of the document with a big heading called Boneyard.   And that is where information can go to rest, and be resurrected as needed.   This helps make it easier to let information go, since it’s never far from reach, while you work on the critical path up front.

    It Takes Longer to Rewrite Than Start from Scratch

    It often takes longer to rewrite a document, than start form scratch simply because you are mired among various stages of rot and decay, while other parts are more fresh and vibrant.   While you can hack away at the decay, tuning and pruning is often not as fast as simply lifting the healthy parts forward.

    I think the concept of learning docs is an important one.  

    And, not necessarily an obvious one.  You may never have the benefit of a painful experience of trying to rewrite something that takes longer to rewrite than to start from scratch.   So you may not even notice just how much the lack of a learning docs approach is holding you, or your team back.

    This is especially true if you work on a team that is used to sharing documents and pairing up on them.   Chances are, they iterate on the same document, with version control, until the document is done.   And, the document, along the way, is heavily laden with comments, and undistilled insights, stepping stones, and spaghetti.   And, it’s a heavy process to bring the document to closure because it’s a continuous navigation through the jungle of half-baked learnings.

    Make It Easy to Throw Away Docs While You Embrace the Learning

    The heart of the problem is that the document at any point in time reflects both creative synthesis and distilled ideas … and learnings in progress.  Meanwhile, people are injecting their latest thinking, which may or may not actually be distilled points or creative synthesis.   This is where the concept of learning docs shines:

    Acknowledge that the documents are learning docs in progress, and make it easy to throw them away while carrying the good forward.

    Getting attached is how you hold yourself back and how you limit the pace at which you can share the best thinking in a non-cluttered, clear, and concise way.

    Hopefully, the power of learning docs will save you a lot of pain and wasted time and energy.  It’s one of those insights that I wish somebody would have shared with me long ago, before I finally stumbled on it myself.   Then again, it might be the type of lesson that you only fully appreciate once you have the problem at a grand scale.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Time Management Tips #20 - Priorities List

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    “Action expresses priorities.” -― Mahatma Gandhi
    “Most of us spend too much time on what is urgent and not enough time on what is important.” -― Stephen R. Covey
    “Things which matter most must never be at the mercy of things which matter least.” -― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Your priority list is not your To-Do list.  It's not your backlog. (Although, you should prioritize your lists.  But, how do you prioritize them?  Hint – this is where your priorities list comes in.)

    Your priorities list is your little list of what’s most important.  It’s your little list of the most important things to achieve.

    How important is your little priorities list?  Let's put it in proper perspective.  A lack of priorities, or the wrong priorities, are one of the leading causes of failure in management, leadership, and otherwise highly capable employees.

    Time management tips #20 is priorities list.  If you don't have one, make one now.  What else could be more important than having a list of priorities list at your finger tips? (If you had your priorities list you would know the answer to that.)

    When you have your little list of priorities, you can say "No" to things.  When you have your little list of priorities, you can check with your manager, or team, or your customers, or your spouse -- are these really the priorities?  Most importantly, you can check with yourself.

    Have you identified the little list of the things that are most important to YOU?  If you know you are working on the most important things, it's easier to focus.  It's easier to give your best.  It's easier to stop the distractions.  It's easier to say, "No" to all the little things that tug at your attention, or compete for your time.

    It's also where peace of mind comes from.  It's instant.  When you know you are working on the right things at the right time, you are on path.

    Conflict of priorities is one of the leading causes of churn, procrastination, and every other productivity killer you can think of.  The only thing worse is having nothing that's important.  And you know what they say, if everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority.

    Resolving conflicts in priorities has been known to part the clouds and make the sun shine brighter.

    In general, you can think of your priorities as your "Why" or "What", while other lists tend to be the "How."  That's a generalization since obviously things will bleed, but what's important is that you have a short, explicit list of your priorities.  When they swirl around in your head they get distorted, so get them out in the open.  When you are in the thick of things, be able to give them a glance, and know whether to about-face or march on.

    As Scott Berkun says, "Priorities are the backbone of progress."  It's true.  After all, if you are making progress against anything else, does it matter?

    Here is an example of a set of my priorities for a month:

    Three Key Wins

    1. High quality Service Description pages for Library
    2. “Run State” IP well defined
    3. “the platform” IA for IP – minimum critical set complete

    Pri Short-List

    1. Service Delivery of Services in Library
    2. IP Collection (Learning Lab Refresh)
    3. Project Plan with Milestones
    4. Sweep Timeline (convert existing to be right and useful)
    5. Knowledge Base Refresh
    6. User Stories – New / Existing (“3-Frame Set”)
    7. Cloud Vantage Framework Update

    We can ignore the details, and focus on the structure.   I had three wins I identified with my manager for the month, and a list of seven outcomes that were top priority.  Did I have a backlog a mile long, and a laundry list of hundreds (if not thousands) of things to do?  Yes.  Did I also have short lists of rated and ranked items for the month?  Yes, that's the list above.  Did I also have rated and ranked items for each week?  You bet.   And did I have short-lists of rated and ranked items each day?  Absolutely.

    While priorities aren't the silver bullet, they are your way to "push back."  They are your "push" when you need it most.  They also are your "pull", that you can ignore at your own peril.  They are also your "peace of mind."

    If you haven't prioritized your priority list, you're missing out.

    For work-life balance skills , check out 30 Days of Getting Results, and for a work-life balance system check out Agile Results at Getting Results.com.

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    The Industry Life Cycle

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    I’m a fan of simple models that help you see things you might otherwise miss, or that help explain how things work, or that simply show you a good lens for looking at the world around you.

    Here’s a simple Industry Life Cycle model that I found in Professor Jason Davis’ class, Technology Strategy (MIT’s OpenCourseWare.)

    image

    It’s a simple backdrop and that’s good.  It’s good because there is a lot of complexity in the transitions, and there are may big ideas that all build on top of this simple frame.

    Sometimes the most important thing to do with a model is to use it as a map.

    What stage is your industry in?

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    Extreme Goal Setting for 2014

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    When’s the last time you went for your personal Epic Win?   If it’s been a while, no worries.  Let’s go big this year.

    I’ll give you the tools.

    I realize time and again, that Bruce Lee was so right when he said, “To hell with circumstances; I create opportunities.”  Similarly, William B. Sprague told us, “Do not wait to strike till the iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.” 

    And, Peter Drucker said, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.”   Similarly, Alan Kay said, "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."

    Well then?  Game on!

    By the way, if you’re not feeling very inspired, check out either my 37 Inspirational Quotes That Will Change Your Life, Motivational Quotes, or my Inspirational Quotes.  They are intense, and I bet you can find your favorite three.

    As I’ve been diving deep into goal setting and goal planning, I’ve put together a set of deep dive posts that will give you a very in-depth look at how to set and achieve any goal you want.   Here is my roundup so far:

    Brian Tracy on 12 Steps to Set and Achieve Any Goal

    Brian Tracy on the Best Times for Writing and Reviewing Your Goals

    Commit to Your Best Year Ever

    Goal Setting vs. Goal Planning

    How To Find Your Major Definite Purpose

    How To Use 3 Wins for the Year to Have Your Best Year Ever

    The Power of Annual Reviews for Achieving Your Goals and Realizing Your Potential

    What Do You Want to Spend More Time Doing?

    Zig Ziglar on Setting Goals

    Hopefully, my posts on goal setting and goal planning save you many hours (if not days, weeks, etc.) of time, effort, and frustration on trying to figure out how to really set and achieve your goals.   If you only read one post, at least read Goal Setting vs. Goal Planning because this will put you well ahead of the majority of people who regularly don’t achieve their goals.

    In terms of actions, if there is one thing to decide, make it Commit to Your Best Year Ever.

    Enjoy and best wishes for your greatest year ever and a powerful 2014.

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    Rounding Up the Greatest Thoughts of All Time

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    I’m on a hunt for the greatest thoughts of all time, expressed as quotes.   I’m a big believer that our language shapes the quality of our lives and that we can shape the landscape of our minds with timeless wisdom and inspirational quotes.

    I especially enjoy little pithy prose, those gems of insight, that remind us of how to live better and operate at a higher level.  I’m a fan of the quotes that really bring out our inner-awesome in work and life.

    Here are a few of my favorite quotes of all time, which reflect some of the greatest thoughts of all time:

    1. “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” — Winston Churchill
    2. “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” — Friedrich Nietzsche
    3. “Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” — Dr. Seuss
    4. “And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln
    5. “Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by every moment that takes your breath away.” – Anonymous
    6. “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” — Henry David Thoreau
    7. “Life beats down and imprisons the soul and art reminds you that you have one.” — Stella Adler
    8. “If you can’t change your fate, change your attitude.” — Amy Tan
    9. “Courage doesn’t always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, ‘I will try again tomorrow.’” — Mary Anne Radmacher
    10. “The first and best victory is to conquer self. To be conquered by self is, of all things, the most shameful and objectionable.” – Plato

    If you have a favorite quote or thought of all time, feel free to share it with me.   I’m working on my timeless wisdom collection in the background, and I want to make it easy to scan the greatest thoughts of all time.

    It will be a collection of evergreen wisdom at your fingertips.

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    Simplicity is the Ultimate Enabler

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    “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” – Albert Einstein

    Simplicity is among the ultimate of pursuits.  It’s one of your most efficient and effective tools in your toolbox.  I used simplicity as the basis for my personal results system, Agile Results, and it’s served me well for more than a decade.

    And yet, simplicity still isn’t treated as a first-class citizen.

    It’s almost always considered as an afterthought.  And, by then, it’s too little, too late.

    In the book, Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices), Roger Sessions shares his insights on how simplicity is the ultimate enabler to solving the myriad of problems that complexity creates.

    Complex Problems Do Not Require Complex Solutions

    Simplicity is the only thing that actually works.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “So yes, the problems are complex.  But complex problems do not ipso facto require complex solutions.  Au contraire!  The basic premise of this book is that simple solutions are the only solutions to complex problems that work.  The complex solutions are simply too complex.”

    Simplicity is the Antidote to Complexity

    It sounds obvious but it’s true.  You can’t solve a problem with the same complexity that got you there in the first place.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “The antidote to complexity is simplicity.  Replace complexity with simplicity and the battle is three-quarters over.  Of course, replacing complexity with simplicity is not necessarily simple.” 

    Focus on Simplicity as a Core Value

    If you want to achieve simplicity, you first have to explicitly focus on it as a core value.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “The first thing you need to do to achieve simplicity is focus on simplicity as a core value.  We all discuss the importance of agility, security, performance, and reliability of IT systems as if they are the most important of all requirements.  We need to hold simplicity to as high a standard as we hold these other features.  We need to understand what makes architectures simple with as much critical reasoning as we use to understand what makes architectures secure, fast, or reliable.  In fact, I argue that simplicity is not merely the equal of these other characteristics; it is superior to all of them.  It is, in many ways, the ultimate enabler.”

    A Security Example

    Complex systems work against security.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “Take security for example.  Simple systems that lack security can be made secure.  Complex systems that appear to be secure usually aren't.  And complex systems that aren't secure are virtually impossible to make either simple or secure.”

    An Agility Example

    Complexity works against agility, and agility is the key to lasting solutions.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “Consider agility.  Simple systems, with their well-defined and minimal interactions, can be put together in new ways that were never considered when these systems were first created.  Complex systems can never used in an agile wayThey are simply too complex.  And, of course, retrospectively making them simple is almost impossible.”

    Nobody Ever Considers Simplicity as a Critical Feature

    And that’s the problem.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “Yet, despite the importance of simplicity as a core system requirement, simplicity is almost never considered in architectural planning, development, or reviews.  I recently finished a number of speaking engagements.  I spoke to more than 100 enterprise architects, CIOs, and CTOs spanning many organizations and countries.  In each presentation, I asked if anybody in the audience had ever considered simplicity as a critical architectural feature for any projects on which they had participated. Not one person had. Ever.”

    The Quest for Simplicity is Never Over

    Simplicity is a quest.  And the quest is never over.  Simplicity is a ongoing pursuit and it’s a dynamic one.  It’s not a one time event, and it’s not static.

    Via Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises (Developer Best Practices):

    “The quest for simplicity is never over.  Even systems that are designed from the beginning with simplicity in mind (rare systems, indeed!) will find themselves under a never-ending attack. A quick tweak for performance here, a quick tweak for interoperability there, and before you know it, a system that was beautifully simple two years ago has deteriorated into a mass of incomprehensibility.”

    Simplicity is your ultimate sword for hacking your way through complexity … in work … in life … in systems … and ecosystems.

    Wield it wisely.

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    Reduce Complexity, Cost, and Time

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    I heard a beautiful nugget on the art of simplicity the other day.  It was about reducing complexity, cost, and time.  Or, to put it another way, it makes a great case for simplicity.

    Why focus on simplicity?

    To reduce complexity. 

    Why reduce complexity?

    It’s the key to reducing cost and time.

    What a great way to connect the dots.

    Aside from improving adoption, if you focus on simplicity, it’s a very real way to improve time to market and cost of goods, and in the end, elegance.

    The big win for me with simplicity is the ability to improve things, whether it’s a process or a product.  If you’ve ever had to deal with a beast of either one, you can appreciate what I mean.  My first goal in taking on something is to drive for simplicity so that it has a fighting chance to improve over time. 

    Complexity dies, where simplicity thrives.

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    30 Days of Getting Results Revisited

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    image

    Do you really know what you are truly capable of?  It’s time to get your game on and find out.  30 Days of Getting Results is revamped and ready for action.  With a new and cleaner look, each lesson brings you a memorable image, a quotable quote, an outcome, a lesson, and a set of exercises to put what you learn into practice.

    It’s time to get the wisdom of the ages and modern sages on your side.  The purpose of 30 Days of Getting Results is to give you the proven principles, patterns, and practices for time management.  It includes 30 self-paced lessons to help you find your purpose, find your passion, set goals, master motivation, and achieve work-life balance.

    The thing that’s really different about Agile Results as a time management system is that it’s focused on meaningful results.  Time is treated as a first-class citizen so that you hit your meaningful windows of opportunity, and get fresh starts each day, each week, each month, each year.  As a metaphor, you get to be the author of your life and write your story forward.

    I used a 30 Day Improvement Sprint, a practice in Agile Results, to create the lessons.  For 30 days, I took 20 minutes each day to write my best lessons down on paper on how to master productivity and time management.  It’s raw.  It’s real.  It’s hopefully some of the best insight and action you’ve ever experienced in terms of exponentially improving your results.

    It’s easy to dive in.  All of the time management lessons are there at your finger tips on the sidebar for easy exploration.  It’s timeless too.   Even if you’ve take the lessons already, they are there as a refresher.  

    If you test-drive just one lesson, check out Bounce Back with Skill.

    Share it with a colleague, a friend, or your family … or anybody you want to give an edge, in work and life.

    Key Links

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    Business Techniques in Troubled Times: A Toolbox for Small Business Success

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    "If you see a bandwagon, it’s too late." -- James Goldsmith

    I’m really focused on helping businesses large and small succeed.  Times are tough.  I’ve been reading a lot of books on business skills and techniques.  The latest book I read is pretty hard-core. 

    And exactly what I wanted to find.

    Here’s my review:

    Business Techniques in Troubled Times: A Toolbox for Small Business Success

    It puts more than 70+ business skills at your fingertips.

    What’s especially interesting is that the author is a turnaround artist.  He helps flailing and failing businesses get back on track.   Imagine having that kinds of ability – to help business rise from the ashes phoenix style.

    That’s cool stuff.

    Actually, it’s very powerful stuff.

    Business transformation is a great place to be in today’s world.

    After all, businesses are re-inventing themselves at a pace never before possible.

    Anyway, you’ll appreciate this book if you want to know …

    How to analyze the marketplace and do true competitive analysis and find your differentiation

    How to design a great product or service

    How to price your product or service more effectively

    How to create a roadmap for your product

    How to prioritize your product ideas

    How to create a more effective business plan

    How to avoid the most common mistakes when making a business plan

    How to analyze a business model

    How to create a financial plan

    I could go on, and on, because this book really packs a lot into it.   It’s an “all-in-one” guide that really covers creating and growing a business.   You’ll especially appreciate this book if you’ve struggled with the “money” part of business.   It’s one thing to have a good idea.  It’s another to fund that idea, and to make it economically viable.   This book actually shows you how.

    The thing I want to stress about this book though is that it’s written by somebody who helps owners save and grow their businesses for a living.

    Within the first fifteen minutes of reading the book, I had at least three new business skills I could immediately apply.

    If you want a deep dive into the book, including snippets and insight, check out my review:

    Business Techniques in Troubled Times: A Toolbox for Small Business Success

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    How To Get Your Groove Back On

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    One of the simplest ways to get your groove back on, is to do things differently. 

    "Do the opposite" is a great strategy.

    For example, if you've been staying up late, try getting up early. (Getting up early can help you go to bed earlier.  And the secret of waking up earlier, is to go to bed earlier.  See the loop?)   Getting up earlier changes your world ... the traffic you see or don't, the people you pass or don't, the quiet times, the busy times, your state of mind.  It all changes because you changed your structure.

    And all you had to do was change your “When”.

    You can apply "Do the opposite" to many things.  It's a great way to cut the baggage.  For example, if you normally write long and lengthy posts, try some short ones.  Set a simple limit, like, “the post must not scroll.”  You might find that you suddenly drop a burden from your back, and now you are light and ready for anything.

    Another way to do the opposite is if you always decide that something must be done later, try doing it now.  If you always do things slow, try doing things fast.  If you always try to be right, try being interesting, useful, or insightful.  Shake it up. 

    Rattle your own cage.

    When we shake our cage, we wake up our possibilities.  We surprise ourselves.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Lessons Learned from John Maxwell Revisited

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    I did a major cleanup of my post on lessons learned from John Maxwell:

    Lessons Learned from John Maxwell

    It should be much easier to read now. 

    It was worth cleaning up because John Maxwell is one of the deepest thinkers in the leadership space.  He’s published more than 50 books on leadership and he lives and breathes leadership in business and in life.

    When I first started studying leadership long ago, John Maxwell’s definition of leadership was the most precise I found:

    “Leadership is influence.”

    As I began to dig through his work, I was amazed at the nuggets and gems and words of wisdom that he shared in so many books.  I started with Your Road Map for Success.   I think my next book was The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.   Ironically, I didn’t realize it was the same author until I started to notice on my shelf that I had a growing collection of leadership books, all by John Maxwell.

    It was like finding the leadership Sherpa.

    Sure enough, over the years, he continued to fill the shelves at Barnes & Nobles, with book after book on all the various nooks and crannies of leadership. 

    This was about the same time that I noticed how Edward de Bono had filled the shelves with books on thinking.  I realized that some people really share there life’s work as a rich library that is a timeless gift for the world.   I also realized that it really helps people stand out in their field or discipline when they contribute so many guides and guidance to the art and science of whatever their specific focus is.

    What I like about John Maxwell’s work is that it’s plain English and down to Earth.  He writes in a very conversational way, and you can actually see his own progress throughout his books.  In Your Road Map for Success, it’s a great example of how he doesn’t treat leadership as something that comes naturally.  He works hard at it, to build his own knowledge base of patterns, practices, ideas, concepts, and inspirational stories.

    While he’s created a wealth of wisdom to help advance the practice of leadership, I think perhaps his greatest contribution is The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.  It’s truly a work of art, and he does an amazing job of distilling down the principles that serve as the backbone of effective leadership.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Impostor Syndrome: Is Your Success Only on the Outside?

    • 1 Comments

    Have you ever felt like a phony?  Like, if “they” found you out, they’d realize that you aren’t as awesome as they thought you were?

    “Impostor syndrome” is a common issue.

    Impostor syndrome is where you can’t internalize your success, and no amount of external validation or evidence helps convince you otherwise.  So you work harder and harder to prove your success, but yet you still don’t quite measure up.

    I’ve mentored a lot of people, and found that a lot of highly successful people actually have impostor syndrome, for one reason or another.  For some, it’s because they feel they are in the fake stage of “fake it until you make it.”  For others, it’s because their success doesn’t match their mental model of how it’s supposed to happen.  For example, success came too quickly, or they feel they got a “lucky break.”   For others, they don’t feel they match what a successful person is supposed to look like, or they don’t have the credentials they think they are supposed to have, or the specific experience they are supposed to have went under their belt.

    So, it’s success on the outside, but no success on the inside.

    And that leads to all sorts of issues, whether it’s a lack of confidence, or self-sabotage, or working harder and harder to validate their external success.

    Not good.

    Luckily, there are proven practices for dealing with impostor syndrome.  

    I have the privilege of a guest post by Joyce Roche, author of The Empress Has No Clothes: Conquering Self-Doubt to Embrace Success:

    7 Ways to Conquer Impostor Syndrome – Lessons from Successful Business Leaders

    It’s a simple set of coping strategies you can use to defeat impostor syndrome and find more fulfillment.

    Enjoy.

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    New Cover for Getting Results the Agile Way

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    image

    I have a new cover for my book, Getting Results the Agile Way.   Getting Results the Agile Way introduces Agile Results, a simple system for meaningful results.

    The purpose of the book is to share the best insights and actions for mastering productivity, time management, motivation, and work-life balance.  In fact, I’ve been doing several talks around Microsoft on work-life balance, and helping teams improve their results.

    It’s the best way I can give the edge to my Microsoft tribe, as well as share the principles, patterns, and practices for getting results with the rest of the world.

    The new cover better reflects the values of Agile Results: Adventure, Balance, Congruence, Continuous learning, Empowerment, Focus, Flexibility, Fulfillment, Growth, Passion, Simplicity, and Sustainability.  Specifically, the cover reflects simplicity, focus, continuous learning, and flexibility.  Hopefully, the simplicity is obvious.  The new cover is pretty bare-bones.  It’s clean, while, minimal, and features a symbol.  In this case, the symbol is a variation of an Enso.  Intuitively, it simply implies a loop.  But if you happen to know the Enso, it’s also a symbol of enlightenment.  The beauty of a symbol is you can make it be what you want it to be to be meaningful for you (for me, it’s continuous learning and growth.)

    Getting Results the Agile Way is serious stuff.   Doctors, lawyers, teachers, students, Moms, restaurant owners, consultants, developers, project managers, team leaders, and more have been using the approach to do more with less, flow more value, and find work-life balance, while improving their thoughts, feelings, and actions to make the most of what they’ve got.

    The system scales down to the one-man band (after all, it is a “personal” results system for work and life), and it scales up to teams.  It’s the same approach I’ve used to lead distributed teams around the world for more than ten years.

    Here is the back of the book which gives a quick overview of the system:

    image

    The new cover will likely be available this October, so if you are a fan of the current blue cover, scoop it up now, while it lasts (maybe it will be a collector’s item some day.)

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Value is the Short-Cut for Building Better Products

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    It's easy to build what's possible.  It's tough to build what's valued.

    If there's one thing I've learned from shipping stuff, doing competitive assessments, working closely with customers, and doing a lot of in-depth feature analysis ... it's that value is the short-cut for building better products.  If you know what's valued, then you can target that.  And, the surprise is, less is often more.  (A little gold, beats a lot of junk, every time.)

    I've also learned that value is in the eye of the beholder.

    What's valued can surprise you.  For example, one customer might value integration, while another customer might value, and pay for, simplicity.  One customer might value security, while another might value usability.  Value is a slider scale and there are always key trade-offs that impact the design.  That's the art part.

    It's easy to assume you know what's valued.  Here's the irony.  It's also easy to check your assumptions.  Customers are happy to tell you whether they prefer A over B.

    Missing the boat on what's valued is one of the worst mistakes.  It's easy to build the wrong thing.  It's also to build something irrelevant.  It's also easy to build “bloat”-ware, where the product is too many things to too many people, and master of none.  Less is more, especially when you solve the problems that people actually care about, and when you enable users to have a great experience achieving their goals.

    Here's the message:  "Do overs" are expensive (if you even get a second chance.)  You don't have to build things that people don't want.  You don't have to build things that people don't value.  You don't have to build things that people won't pay for. 

    You can test the value, early and often.  And, that's what some successful shippers do that other shippers don't.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    How To Scale as a One-Man Band to Improve Your Productivity and Amplify Your Impact

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    Getting better, faster, simpler, and more meaningful results is the name of today’s game.

    What you don’t know can hurt you.  Your own and other people’s productivity issues can get in your way.  This is especially true if you don’t know what good looks like.  This is especially true, if you don’t know what’s possible.

    There are many ways to take your game to the next level.  Everything from eliminating bottlenecks to focusing on the right things to flowing more value to reducing friction.    If you are a one-man band and really need ways to scale yourself more effectively, I have written a deep post on how to scale yourself as a “one-man band” to flow more value, get more things done, and free up more time for yourself:

    Note – I wrote it in 40 minutes, so hopefully it only takes you five minutes to read it.  Normally, I limit writing a post to 20 minutes or less, but for this one, I figured the value of it, is worth if I had to spill over.  I see too many people bogged down, losing sight of value, and not knowing how to get off the treadmill.  I figured a pointed post on how to free yourself up and flow more value would be worth it.

    Enjoy – and feel free to share your own proven practices for scaling yourself with skill.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    10 Big Ideas from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

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    It’s long over-do, but I finally wrote up my 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

    What can I say … the book is a classic.

    I remember when my Dad first recommended that I read The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People long ago.   In his experience, while Tony Robbins was more focused on Personality Ethic, Stephen Covey at the time was more focused on Character Ethic.  At the end of the day, they are both complimentary, and one without the other is a failed strategy.

    While writing 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, I was a little torn on what to keep in and what to leave out.   The book is jam packed with insights, powerful patterns, and proven practices for personal change.   I remembered reading about the Law of the Harvest, where you reap what you sow.  I remembered reading about how to think Win/Win, and how that helps you change the game from a scarcity mentality to a mindset of abundance.   I remembered reading about how we can move up the stack in terms of time management if we focus less on To Dos and more on relationships and results.   I remembered reading about how if we want to be heard, we need to first seek to understand.

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is probably one of the most profound books on the planet when it comes to personal change and empowerment.

    It’s full of mental models and big ideas.  

    What I really like about Covey’s approach is that he bridged work and life.  Rather than splinter our lives, Covey found a way to integrate our lives more holistically, to combine our personal and professional lives through principles that empower us, and help us lead a more balanced life.

    Here is a summary list of 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People:

    1. The Seven Habits Habits of Effectiveness.
    2. The Four Quadrants of Time Management.
    3. Character Ethic vs. Personality Ethic
    4. Increase the Gap Between Stimulus and Response.
    5. All Things are Created Twice.
    6. The Five Dimensions of Win/Win.
    7. Expand Your Circle of Influence.
    8. Principle-Centered Living.
    9. Four Generations of Time Management.
    10. Make Meaningful Deposits in the Emotional Bank Account.

    In my post, I’ve summarized each one and provided one of my favorite highlights from the book that brings each idea to life.

    Enjoy.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Guy Kawasaki on Self-Publishing

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    I’m honored to have a guest post by Guy Kawasaki on Top Ten Reasons to Self-Publish.   Self-publishing is hot.   It’s a great path, especially if you can use writing as a way to share and scale what you know.  

    That said, there is a lot to know when it comes to the business of books, and that’s what Guy’s latest book, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book, is all about.

    One of the big surprises I found in terms of self-publishing is that I made more in a month, than I made in a year, once I shipped the Kindle version.   I knew there would be a difference, but I didn’t really anticipate just how big that difference would be.

    The other thing I learned is that there is a big difference in what you can achieve if you look at self-publishing in terms of a longer-term play.   The best advice I got from a friend was to think of it more like a slow burn, than a fast flame.   This helped me experiment more and play around with everything from different covers, to different taglines, to different formats, etc.  As a result, it’s been a best-seller in Time Management on Amazon for many months, which is an extremely competitive niche.

    But I digress.  Check out Guy Kawasaki’s guest post for me on Top Ten Reasons to Self-Publish.  Who knows, it might just be your future career, or play a big role as we shift to a digital economy of information products and insight.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Value is Everybody’s Job

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    Back in 2010, Gartner suggested that Business Value Realization would be Enterprise Architecture finally done right.  Related, when people were confused by the scope of Value Realization, all we did was add "Business” up front (i.e. “Business Value Realization”) and that seemed to add instant clarity for people, and they said they got it. 

    They realized that it was all about extracting business value and accelerating business value.

    The most interesting pattern I think I see is not that value is an individual thing. 

    It's that any individual can create value in today’s world – with their network, the ways they work, the technology at their fingertips -- they can focus on their end users and continuous learning, and operate without walls. 

    In fact, the enticing promise of the Enterprise Social vision is comprehensive collaboration.

    There was an uprising in the developer world to create customer value -- it was agile. 

    It seems like the world is experiencing another uprising (and you hear Satya Nadella talk about a focus on individuals whether in business or life, focused on learning, collaborating, and changing the world.)

    So it's not the CIO, the CEO, etc.

    What is the new uprising?

    Value is everybody's job.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Dual-Speed IT Drives Digital Business Transformation and Improves IT-Business Relationships

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    Don’t try to turn all of your traditional IT into a digital unit.  

    You’ll break both, or do neither well.

    Instead,  add a Digital Unit.   Meanwhile, continue to simplify and optimize your traditional IT, but, at the same time, add a Digital Unit that’s optimized to operate in a Cloud-First, Mobile-First world.

    This is the Dual-Speed IT approach, and, with this way, you can choose the right approach for the job and get the best of both worlds.

    Some projects involve more extensive planning because they are higher-risk and have more dependencies.

    Other projects benefit from a loose learning-by-doing method, with rapid feedback loops, customer impact, and testing new business waters.

    And, over time, you can shift the mix.

    In the book, Leading Digital: Turning Technology into Business Transformation, George Westerman, Didier Bonnet, and Andrew McAfee, share some of their lessons learned from companies that are Digital Masters that created their digital visions and are driving business change.

    Build Digital Skills Into One of Your Existing Business Units

    You can grow one of your existing business units into a Digital Unit.  For example, marketing is a pretty good bet, given the customer focus and the business impact.

    Via Leading Digital:

     

    “Changing the IT-business relationship is well worth the effort, but doing so takes time.  Your company may not have the time to wait before starting your digital transformation.  Rather than improving the IT unit, some companies try to build digital skills into another unit, such as marketing.  They try to work around IT rather than with it.”

    Don’t Mix Your Digital Unit with Your Traditional IT

    Don’t throw away your existing IT or break it by turning it into something it’s not, too quickly.   Instead, leverage it for the projects where it makes sense, while also leveraging your new Digital IT unit.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “Although building digital skills is useful, trying to work around IT can be fraught with challenges, especially if people do not understand the reasons for IT's systematic, if sometimes ponderous, processes.  This kind of flanking action can waste money, make the digital platform more complex, and even worse, open the company to security and regulatory risks.”

    Create a Dual-Speed IT to Support Both Traditional IT and Faster-Speed Digital Transformation

    You can have the best of both worlds, while both evolving your traditional IT and growing your Digital Unit to thrive at Cloud speed.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “A better approach is to create a dual-speed IT structure, where one part of the IT unit continues to support traditional IT needs, while another takes on the challenge of operating at digital speed with the business.  Digital activities--especially in customer engagement--move faster than many traditional IT ones.  They look at design processes differently.  Where IT projects have traditionally depended on clear designs and well-structured project plans, digital activities often engage in test-and-learn strategies, trying features in real-life experiments and quickly adding or dropping them based on what they find.”

    Optimize the Digital Unit for Digital World

    Your Digital Unit needs to be very different from traditional IT in terms of the mindset and the approaches around the people, processes, and technology.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “In a dual-speed approach, the digital unit can develop processes and methods at clock-speeds more closely aligned with the digital world, without losing sight of the reasons that the old IT processes existed.  IT leaders can draw on informal relationships within the IT department to get access to legacy systems or make other changes happen.  Business leaders can use their networks to get input and resources.  Business and IT leaders can even start to work together in the kind of two-in-a-box leadership method that LBG and other companies have adopted.”

    Choose the Right Leadership Both in the Business and in IT

    To make it work and to make it work well, it takes partnerships on both sides.   The business and IT both need skin in the game.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “Building dual-speed IT units requires choosing the right leadership on both sides of the relationship.  Business executives need to be comfortable with technology and with being challenged by their IT counterparts.  IT leaders need to have a mind-set that extends beyond technology to encompass the processes and drivers of business performance.  Leaders from both sides need to be strong communicators who can slide easily between conversations with their business- or IT-focused people.”

    Great IT Leaders Know When to Choose Traditional IT vs. the Digital Unit

    With both options at your disposal, Great IT Leaders know how to choose the right approach for the job.   Some programs and projects will take a more traditional life-cycle or require heavier planning or more extensive governance and risk management, while other projects can be driven in a more lightweight and agile way.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “Dual-speed IT also requires perspective about the value of speed.  Not all digital efforts need the kind of fast-moving, constantly changing processes that digital customer-engagement processes can need.  In fact, the underlying technology elements that powered LBG's new platform, Asian Paints' operational excellence, and Nike's digital supply chain enhancements required the careful, systematic thinking that underpins traditional IT practices.  Doing these big implementations in a loose learning-by-doing method could be dangerous.  It could increase rework, waste money, and introduce security risks.  But once the strong digital platform is there, building new digital capabilities can be fast, agile, and innovative.  The key is to understand what you need in each type of project and how much room any project has to be flexible and agile.  Great IT leaders know how to do this.  If teamed with the right business leaders, they can make progress quickly and safely.”

    Dual-Speed IT Requires New Processes within IT

    It takes a shift in processes to do Dual-Speed IT.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “Dual-speed IT also takes new processes inside IT.  Few digital businesses have the luxury to wait for monthly software release cycles for all of their applications.  Digital-image hosting business Flickr, for example, aims for up to ten deployments per day, while some businesses require even more.  This continuous-deployment approach requires very tight discipline and collaboration between development, test, and operations people.  A bug in software, missed step in testing, or configuration problem in deployment can bring down a web site or affect thousands of customers.”

    DevOps Makes Dual Speed IT Possible

    DevOps blends development and operations into a more integrated approach that simplifies and streamlines processes to shorten cycle times and speed up fixes and feedback loops.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “A relatively new software-development method called DevOps aims to make this kind of disciplined speed possible.  It breaks down silos between development, operations, and quality assurance groups, allowing them to collaborate more closely and be more agile.  When done properly, DevOps improves the speed and reliability of application development and deployment by standardizing development environments.  It uses strong methods and standards, including synchronizing the tools used by each group.”

    DevOps Can Help IT Release Software Better, Faster, Cheaper, and More Reliably

    DevOps is the name of the game when it comes to shipping better, faster, cheaper and more reliably in a Cloud-First, Mobile-First world.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “DevOps relies heavily on automated tools to do tasks in testing, configuration control, and deployment—tasks that are both slow and error-prone when done manually.  Companies that use DevOps need to foster a culture where different IT groups can work together and where workers accept the rules and methods that make the process effective.  The discipline, tools, and strong processes of DevOps can help IT release software more rapidly and with fewer errors, as well as monitor performance and resolve process issues more effectively, than before.”

    Driving Digital Transformation Takes a Strong Link Between Business and IT Executives

    In order for your Digital Transformation to thrive, it takes building better bridges between the business leaders and the IT leaders.

    Via Leading Digital:

    “Whether your CIO takes it upon himself or herself to improve the IT-business relationship, or you decide to help make it happen, forging a strong link between business and IT executives is an essential part of driving digital transformation.  Strong IT-business relationships can transform the way IT works and the way the business works with it.  Through trust and shared understanding, your technology and business experts can collaborate closely, like at LBG, to innovate your business at digital speeds.  Without this kind of relationship, your company may become mired in endless requirements discussion, filing projects, and lackluster systems, while your competitors accelerate past you in the digital fast lane.”

    If you want to thrive in the new digital economy while driving digital business transformation without breaking your existing business, consider adding Dual-Speed IT to your strategies and shift the mix from traditional IT to your Digital Unit over time.

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Brand is the Ultimate Differentiator

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    One town that all roads seem to lead to, is that … brand is the ultimate differentiator.

    It’s a reflection of the perception of perceived value, the emotional benefits, the intangibles and the culture and the values that the brand stands for.  In fact, a good way to test your brand is to figure out the three to five attributes that it represents.  

    Brand is a powerful thing because it’s a position in the mind.  For some categories, especially on the Web, sometimes you only need one brand at the top, and the rest don’t matter.  That’s why sometimes the only way to play, is to divide the niche, or expand to a new category.

    As an individual, your brand can serve you in many ways at your company, from opening doors to creating glide paths … especially, when your reputation proceeds you in a good way.

    The trick as an individual is, how do you fit in, while finding ways to stand out and sharing your unique value?

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Press Release for Getting Results the Agile Way on Kindle

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    The press release for Getting Results the Agile Way is now live at Time Management Tips and Time Management Strategies for Achievers.   I think the message hits a sweet spot – it’s a time management system for achievers.  (One interesting tidbit along those lines is that Getting Results the Agile Way was #2 on the Amazon best sellers list in Germany for “time management”.)

    Here are the opening paragraphs:

    Some say, “Time is all we have.” To master time is to master life. The secret of time management is to have a trusted system and a collection of time management tips and time management strategies to draw from.

    Getting Results the Agile Way, by J.D. Meier, now available on Kindle, is a time management system for achievers focused on meaningful results. The power of Getting Results the Agile Way is that it combines some of the best practices for thinking, feeling, and taking action into one simple system to help achievers make the most of what they’ve got.

    You can read the rest of the press release at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/10/prweb8914806.htm

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    The Changing Landscape of Competitive Advantage

    • 0 Comments

    In the article, The Strategy Accelerator, Alfred Griffioen shares some specific examples of how today’s landscape changes the competitive arena:

    • Online auctions replace relationship-based purchasing processes.
    • Small, innovative companies can offer their services and compete with larger players.
    • Faster product rationalization -- fast distribution technologieis increase the competition among products, while prices decline.
    • Transparency has increased, moving investment decisions from a company level to an activity level.
    • Knowledge can be obtained more easily, relevant components and partners can be found all over the world, and financial. resources can be obtained more easily for a good idea.
    • Small, specialized organizations with high added value activities can lead the new economy.

    I’ve seen this in action, and I like how Alfred called these out.  It helps us not just see the landscape, but start to form new rules for the road.

    My Related Posts

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