J.D. Meier's Blog

Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

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    The Future of Jobs

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    Will you have a job in the future?

    What will that job look like and how will the nature of work change?

    Will automation take over your job in the near future?

    These are the kinds of questions that Ruth Fisher, author of Winning the Hardware-Software Game, has tackled in a series of posts.

    I wrote a summary post to distill her big ideas and insights about the future of jobs in my post:

    The Future of Jobs

    Fisher has done an outstanding job of framing out the landscape and walking the various arguments and perspectives on how automation will change the nature of work and shape the future of jobs.

    One of the first things you might be wondering is, what jobs will automation take away?

    Fisher addresses that.

    Another question is, what new types jobs will be created?

    While that’s an exercise for the reader, Fisher provides clues based on what industry luminaries have seen in terms of how jobs are changing.

    The key is to know what automation can and can’t do, and to look at the pattern of work in terms of what’s better suited for humans, and what’s better suited for machines.

    As one of my mentors puts it, “If the work can be automated, it’s not human.”

    He’s a fan of people doing creative, non-routine work, where they can thrive and shine.

    As I take on work, or push back on work, I look through a pretty simple lens:

    1. Is the work repetitive in nature? (in which case, something that should be automated)
    2. Is the work a high-value activity? (if not, why am I doing non high-value activities?)
    3. Does the work create greater capability? (for me, the team, the organization, etc.)
    4. Does the work play to my strengths? (if not, who is a better resource or provider.  You grow faster in your strengths, and in today’s world, if people aren’t giving their best where they have their best to give, it leads to a low-impact team that eventually gets out-executed, or put out to Pasteur.)
    5. Does the work lead to world-class impact?  (When everything gets exposed beyond the firewall, and when it’s a globally connected ecosystem, it’s really important to not only bring your A-game, but to play in a way where you can provide the best service in the world for your specific niche.   If you can’t be the best in your niche in a sustainable way, then you’re in the wrong niche.)

    I find that by using this simple lens, I tend to take on high-value work that creates high-impact, that cannot be easily automated.  At the same time, while I perform the work, I look for way to turn things into repetitive activities that can be outsources or automated so that I can keep moving up the stack, and producing higher-value work … that’s more human.

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    The Myths of Business Model Innovation

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    Business model innovation has a couple of myths.

    One myth is that business model innovation takes big thinking.  Another myth about business model innovation is that technology is the answer.

    In the book, The Business Model Navigator, Oliver Gassman, Karolin Frankenberger, and Michaela Csik share a couple of myths that need busting so that more people can actually achieve business model innovation.

    The "Think Big" Myth

    Business model innovation does not need to be “big bang.”  It can be incremental.  Incremental changes can create more options and more opportunities for serendipity.

    Via The Business Model Navigator:

    “'Business model innovations are always radical and new to the world.'   Most people associate new business models with the giants leaps taken by Internet companies.  The fact is that business model innovation, in the same way as product innovation, can be incremental.  For instance, Netflix's business model innovation of mailing DVDs to customers was undoubtedly incremental and yet brought great success to the company.  The Internet opened up new avenues for Netflix that allowed the company to steadily evolve into an online streaming service provider.”

    The Technology Myth

    It’s not technology for technology’s sake.  It’s applying technology to revolutionize a business that creates the business model innovation.

    Via The Business Model Navigator:

    “'Every business model innovation is based on a fascinating new technology that inspires new products.'  The fact is that while new technologies can indeed drive new business models, they are often generic in nature.  Where creativity comes in is in applying them to revolutionize a business.  It is the business application and the specific use of the technology which makes the difference.  Technology for technology's sake is the number one flop factor in innovation projects.  The truly revolutionary act is that of uncovering the economic potential of a new technology.”

    If you want to get started with business model innovation, don’t just go for the home run.

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    The Future of Jobs

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes

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    One of the smartest books I’ve read lately is Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes, by Maria Konnikova.  I wrote a deep review to include a bunch of my favorite highlights.

    It’s hard to believe I only scratched the surface in my review, but it’s a very deep book with tons of insight and proven practices for elevating your thinking to the highest levels.

    While I like the concepts and practices throughout the book, my favorite aspect was the fact that Konnikova references some great research and theories by name and illustrated how they apply in our everyday lives.  

    Some of the examples include:

    • Correspondence Bias
    • Scooter Libby effect
    • Attention Blindness
    • Selective Listening

    Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes includes plenty of surprising insights, too.  For example, we physically can see less when we’re in a bad mood.  We can do better on SATs simply by changing our motivation.  We can use simple meditation techniques to causes changes at the neural level, to increase creativity and imaginative capacity.

    If you’re a developer, you’ll appreciate the “system” view of how memory works.  Konnikova walks the mechanisms of the mind based on the latest understanding of how our brain works.  You’ll also appreciate the depth and details that Konnikova provides to help you really understand how to think and operate at a higher level.

    Basically, you’ll learn how to put your Sherlock Holme’s thinking cap on and apply more effective thinking practices that avoid common cognitive biases, pitfalls, and traps.

    By the time you’ve made it through the book, you’ll also better understand and appreciate how our mindset and filters dramatically shape what we’re able to see, and, as a result, how we experience the world around us.

    If you want a tour of the book in detail, check out my book review of Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes.

    It might just be one of the smartest books you read this year.

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    Time Management Tips #19 - Just Finish

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    Sometimes you need to Just Start.  Other times, you need to Just Finish.

    One of the best ways never to finish something, is to spread it out over time.  Time changes what's important.  People lose interest.  Changes of heart happen along the way.  Spreading things over time or pushing them out is a great way to kill projects.

    Open items, open loops, and unfinished tasks compound the problem.  The more unfinished work there is, the more task switching, and context switching you do.  Now you're spending more time switching between things, trying to pick up where you left off, and losing momentum.

    This is how backlogs grow and great ideas die.  This is how people that "do" become people that "don't."

    Time management tips #19 is just finish.  If you have a bunch of open work, start closing it down.  Swarm it.  Overwhelm your open items with brute force.  Set deadlines:
    - Today, I clear my desk.
    - Today, I decide on A, B, or C and run with it.
    - Today, I close the loop.
    - Today, I solve it.
    - Today, I clear my backlog.

    If you want to finish something, then “own” it and drive it.  To finish requires ruthless prioritization.  It requires relentless focus.  It requires putting your full force on the 20% of the things that deliver 80% of the value.  It requires deciding on an outcome and plowing through until you are done.

    Stop taking on more, until you finish what's on your plate.  If you want to take on more, then finish more.  The more you finish, the better you get.

    The more you finish, the more you will trust yourself to actually complete things.

    The more you finish, the more others will trust you to actually take things on.

    The more you finish, the more you build your momentum for great results.

    For time management skills , check out 30 Days of Getting Results, and for a time management system check out Agile Results at Getting Results.com.

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    Agile Avoids Work About Work

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    I was reading a nice little eBook on Opportunities and Challenges with Agile Portfolio Management.

    I especially like this part on “Work About Work” and how Agile helps avoid it:

    “Agile software development is all about eliminating overhead. Instead of establishing hierarchies and rules, Agile management zeros in on what the team can do right now, and team leaders, developers and testers roll up their sleeves to deliver working software by the end of the day.
    Put another way, Agile software development favors real work over what I call "work about work." Work-about-work is that dreaded situation where creating reports about the project is so time-consuming it prevents you from actually working on the project.”

    It’s true.

    Agile helps you make things happen, and focus on work, versus “work about work.”

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    Time Management Tips # 10 - Set Limits

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    Untitled

    I hate quotas.  For me, I'm about quality, not quantity.  And yet quotas have consistently helped me get the ball rolling, or find out what I'm capable of.

    Time management tips # 10 – set limits.  When we set a quota, we have a target.  It helps turn a goal into something we can count.  And when we can count it, we build momentum.

    In my early days of Microsoft, my manager set a limit that I needed to write two Knowledge Base articles per month.  I did that, and more.  Way more.  It turned out to be a big deal.  Before that limit, I didn't think I could do any or would ever do any.

    A few years back, I set a limit that my posts would be no longer than six inches (yeah, that sounds like a weird size limit, but I wanted to fill no more than where the gray box on my blog faded to white.)  My blog ended up in the top 50 blogs on MSDN, of more than 5,000 blogs, and my readership grew exponentially that month.  The reason I set the size limit is because my original limit was "write no more than 20 minutes."  The problem is, when I'm in my execution mode, I write fast, and my posts were getting really long, even if I only wrote for 20 minutes.

    Setting limits in time, size, or quantity can help you in so many ways.  Especially, if getting started is tough.  One great way to start, is simply to ask, "What's one thing I can do today towards XYZ?"  Limits also help us avoid from getting overwhelmed or bogged down.  If we’re feeling heavy or overburdened, start chopping at limits until your load feels lighter.

    Here are some example of some limits you can try:

    1. Write one blog post each day.
    2. Spend a maximum of 20 minutes each day on XYZ.
    3. Spend a minimum of 30 minutes on exercise every other day.
    4. Spend 30 days on XYZ.
    5. Read three books this month.
    6. Cut the time of your XYZ routine in half.
    7. Ship one phone app this month.
    8. Ship one eBook this month.
    9. Start one blog this month.
    10. Spend no more than 30 minutes on email a day.

    Once you set a limit, you suddenly get resourceful in findings new ways to optimize, or new ways to make it happen.  When there is no limit, it's tough to optimize because you don't know when you are done.

    While I'm a fan of quality, the trick is to first "flow some water through the pipe" so you can tune, prune, and improve it.

    If you're feeling rusty, try setting little limits to bootstrap what you're capable of.

    In 30 Days of Getting Results, you can use the time management exercises to be more effective and get exponential results on a daily and weekly basis.  You can also find more time management tips in my book, Getting Results the Agile Way, and on Getting Results.com

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    Focus Checklist v2

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    It was time for an update.

    Here’s my Focus Checklist v2:

    Focus Checklist (v2)

    Here’s what’s new …

    I organized the checklist into more meaningful buckets.   It’s mostly the original list, but now they are grouped into better buckets to make it easier to turn into action.  After all, a great checklist is measured both by it’s value and how actionable it is.

    Focus is often the different that makes the difference when it comes to succeeding at work and succeeding in life.   Otherwise, we don’t see things to fruition, or we bi-furcate our potential in ways that undermines our effort.

    To make it easy to get to the Focus Checklist, I added a quick menu item to the feature menu:

    image

    You can still get to the checklists from Resources, but the saying “out of sight, out of mind”, tends to be true.

    By moving Checklists to the feature bar, it will remind me to continue to turn insight into action in the form of simple checklists.

    I’ve long been a fan of checklists for building better habits and sharing and scaling expertise.   I’ve used them for security, performance, application architecture, and for personal effectiveness in a variety of ways.   There’s actually a lot of research and science behind why checklists are effective, but I like to think of them as simple reminders and automation for the mind, so we can move up the mental stack and focus on higher-level issues.

    If you’re a fan of Personal Software Process (PSP) or Team Software Process (TSP), you’ll appreciate the fact that checklists are one of the best ways to quickly, efficiency, and effectively radically improve quality, for yourself or for the team.  Of course, that depends on the quality of the checklist, and your focus on actually applying it, and treating it like a living document, and keeping it updated with your latest insights and actions.

    If you adopt checklists as your tool of choice for continuous improvement, you’ll be in good company.  It’s how McDonald’s and Disney spread best practices.  It’s how the best hospitals reduce errors and raise the quality bar.   And, it’s even how the Air Force keeps fighter pilots from falling prey to task saturation.

    Like anything, the value of the checklists depends on the user and the usage, and if you treat it as a static thing, that’s when problems happen.   Use it as a baseline and adapt it to your needs, and update it based on your latest learnings.

    If you do that, and you treat your checklists as continuous learning tools, and you continue to evolve and adapt them, then your checklists will serve you well.

    Ugh … it looks like this post ran into some scope creep.  This was supposed to be just letting you know that I have a new version available of my focus checklist.

    Luckily, my 5-minute timebox in this case, reeled me back in.

    Enjoy.

    PS – It’s worth noting that the practices behind this focus checklist are industrial strength.   Folks with ADD and ADHD have used the practices in this checklist to retrain their brain to focus with skill.  They learned to direct and redirect their attention, and to enjoy the process of focusing their mind on meaningful results.

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    25 Holiday Classic Movies and a Lesson Learned

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    A few years back, I put together a roundup of 25 holiday classic movies to help people find their holiday spirit:

    What 25 Holiday Classics Teach Us About Life and Fun

    The post was pretty broken in terms of formatting, but the content is evergreen, so I took the time to revamp it.  It should be 1000 times better now (at least.)

    If you’re a movie buff, you'll recognize a lot of the classics, like The Lemon Drop Kid, or The Bishop’s Wife, or White Christmas.

    I can never find anybody who has actually seen Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol, though it’s still one of my favorite versions.

    And when it comes to Claymation, my favorite is still Rudolph.  I can never forget the scene where Yukon Cornelius says, “Look at what he can do!”, and the Bumble (the Abominable Snowman) puts the star on the top of the tree, without a ladder.

    And whenever I see a sad looking little tree, I can’t help but wonder if adding a bunch of lights would magically transform it into a big, magnificent, and full tree, Charlie Brown style.

    Transformation isn’t magic though.

    It’s a lot of work.  A lot of smart work.

    As you get ready for this coming year, I hope that the key lessons you learned, and the key insights from this past year serve you well.

    If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s how investing in the right capabilities pays off time and time again.

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    The Power of Learning Docs

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    The key to effective knowledge management is to throw away documents.   You can’t get attached to what you write down.  Otherwise, you can’t learn and it won’t evolve.   But there is a trick …

    You throw away the document, not the learning.

    I learned this the hard way.   Several years back, I was trying to rewrite a document that had a bunch of gems, mired among bad ideas and bad writing.   It was the equivalent of spaghetti code.   It was hard to figure out what was the insight, what was the action, and what was just interesting information, but not critical path.

    It Often Takes Longer to Reshape than to Start Over

    I spent close to 40 hours trying to rewrite it.   Granted it was a long document, but at some point I had to ask myself, which was faster – re-writing it, or starting over?   Eventually, I realized, the right answer was to start over.

    So I started with a blank document.   And then I carried over the gems, and elaborated from there.  Within 8 hours, I was done with the finished document.

    The big lesson I learned was how difficult it actually is to reshape something that’s off, especially when it comes to written information.   Since this was prescriptive guidance, it had to be relevant, actionable, and timely.   It had to be insanely useful.   And to do that requires a lot of manipulating words and phrases until the bright ideas compile into actionable guidance with conceptual integrity.

    Throwing Away Documents is Hard if You are Attached

    But “throwing away” a document was tough.

    At least, it was tough until I realized that all the document really was, was a learning doc.   It was a place to experiment and put ideas down on paper and bounce them off of other people, and get the collective perspective.   The problem was, this learning doc, wasn’t the same as a bunch of notes.  It was meant to be the final document.  It was on path to be so.  

    But, along the way, what I failed to realize is that it baked in a bunch of our learnings.

    It didn’t yet reflect creative synthesis, or distillation.

    It was more like a trail up the mountain, and we were still on our way up.

    Throw Away Documents, But Carry Forward Lessons Learned

    I had a conversation with John Socha, the guy behind Norton Commander.  I explained the challenge of producing useful documents, and how our learnings get in the way, if we don’t let the documents go.   Surprisingly, he said to me, “Exactly!”

    He continued and basically said that it’s the mistake a lot of people make.  They hold on to their documents long past their usefulness, and don’t let the documents go, but carry the learnings forward.

    I don’t know what painful lessons John had gone through to learn that, but at the time, it was fresh on my mind, and it had cost me 40+ hours of trial and error to move a document forward to learn that vital lesson.

    Fresh Docs Help You Express Ideas More Clearly

    You need to be able to throw documents away to create something better in its place. 

    When it’s pen and paper, it’s easier to throw something in the trash bin.   But, when it’s a digital document it’s, it’s easy to forget what it feels like to start fresh.   You don’t lose something.   You gain something.  It’s whitespace, where you are free and able to express things more clearly, now that you have more clarity.

    Whitespace loves creative synthesis and distilled ideas.

    It’s a breeding ground for new ways of expressing what you now know that you have climbed further up the mountain.   If the path before you is riddled with your previous learnings, it can tough to see how to pave your way ahead, or worse, how to make a cleaner path for others to follow, which, after all, is the point of the knowledge and information you are attempting to share.

    Learning Docs Are Your Friend

    They are you friend.   If you let them go.

    They come in all shapes and sizes.   They may even resemble raw notes.   What’s important is that you acknowledge that they are just that.   They are learning docs and you need to be free to throw them away and start from scratch at any point in time.

    This is fundamental to creating a relevant, actionable, and timely document set that helps your users climb the mountain.

    This is especially important when it comes to collaborating on documents.   In fact, that’s exactly where I first learned this lesson, and spent 40 hours trying to fix an 8 hour document.

    Versions + Boneyards Help You Throw Away More Effectively

    Once I learned that lesson, I had to find ways to incrementally and iteratively evolve documents as a team (or by myself.)   I adopted some simple conventions.   One convention that served me well is to version documents in the title:  MyDocument – v1, MyDocument – v2, MyDocument – v3, etc.

    It takes judgment when to decide it’s worth calling the document a new version, but it also helps to let things go from one version to the next.

    Another practice that has worked well for learning docs is to have a Boneyard section at the end of the document.   Literally, a dumping ground at the bottom of the document with a big heading called Boneyard.   And that is where information can go to rest, and be resurrected as needed.   This helps make it easier to let information go, since it’s never far from reach, while you work on the critical path up front.

    It Takes Longer to Rewrite Than Start from Scratch

    It often takes longer to rewrite a document, than start form scratch simply because you are mired among various stages of rot and decay, while other parts are more fresh and vibrant.   While you can hack away at the decay, tuning and pruning is often not as fast as simply lifting the healthy parts forward.

    I think the concept of learning docs is an important one.  

    And, not necessarily an obvious one.  You may never have the benefit of a painful experience of trying to rewrite something that takes longer to rewrite than to start from scratch.   So you may not even notice just how much the lack of a learning docs approach is holding you, or your team back.

    This is especially true if you work on a team that is used to sharing documents and pairing up on them.   Chances are, they iterate on the same document, with version control, until the document is done.   And, the document, along the way, is heavily laden with comments, and undistilled insights, stepping stones, and spaghetti.   And, it’s a heavy process to bring the document to closure because it’s a continuous navigation through the jungle of half-baked learnings.

    Make It Easy to Throw Away Docs While You Embrace the Learning

    The heart of the problem is that the document at any point in time reflects both creative synthesis and distilled ideas … and learnings in progress.  Meanwhile, people are injecting their latest thinking, which may or may not actually be distilled points or creative synthesis.   This is where the concept of learning docs shines:

    Acknowledge that the documents are learning docs in progress, and make it easy to throw them away while carrying the good forward.

    Getting attached is how you hold yourself back and how you limit the pace at which you can share the best thinking in a non-cluttered, clear, and concise way.

    Hopefully, the power of learning docs will save you a lot of pain and wasted time and energy.  It’s one of those insights that I wish somebody would have shared with me long ago, before I finally stumbled on it myself.   Then again, it might be the type of lesson that you only fully appreciate once you have the problem at a grand scale.

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    Making Sure Your Life Energy is Well Spent

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    I love one-liners that really encapsulate ideas.  A colleague asked me how work was going with some new projects spinning up and a new team.  But she prefaced it with, “Your book is all about making sure your life energy is well spent.   Are you finding that you are now spending your energy on the right things and with the right people?”  (She was referring to my book, Getting Results the Agile Way.)

    I thought was both a great way to frame the big idea of the book, and to ask a perfectly cutting question that cuts right through the thick of things, to the heart of things.

    Are you spending your life energy on the right things?

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Health Books

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    imageI did a revamp and sweep of my health books collection.  The focus of my collection of health books and fitness books is to help you get healthy, get in shape, get lean, and get strong.   I’ve collected and tested many books to find patterns and practices for health and fitness that actually work.

    Some of the new additions to the collection include:

    • Body by Science
    • Super Immunity
    • Your Body as Your Gym

    Your Body as Your Gym is the most recent addition.  It’s an incredible system.  Here’s the deal.  As a Navy Seal instructor, Mark Lauren needed to find a way to get more people in better shape in record time.  He’s refined what he’s learned over years to get rapid results.  The best part is it’s using your own body so you can do it anywhere.  He wanted everyone to be able to get in the best shape of their lives and leverage what he’s learned from the special forces.  It’s all about building lean, functional muscle, and using interval training.  His routine is four times a week, 30 minutes a day.

    I added Super Immunity to the collection.   Dr. Fuhrman is a doctor that gets results.  I know several Microsofties that have followed his approach to get in the best shape of their lives.   What I like about Dr. Fuhrman is that he focuses on principles, patterns, and practices.  His specialty is “nutritional density.”  He focuses on the food that have the highest nutritional value per calories.  Super Immunity is all about building up your immune system by eating the right foods to get your body on your side.  In a world where we can’t afford to be sick anymore, this book is in a class all its own.

    One of the books in my health books collection is Better Eyesight without Glasses, by William Bates.  This book is near and dear to my heart.   I used this approach to avoid getting glasses.   A long story short is that I failed my eye test back in 7th grade, and I was determined not to wear glasses.  I intercepted the letter that went to my parents and that bought me time.  I then used the exercises from Better Eyesight without Glasses to get to 20/20 vision.  As you can imagine, I saved a lot of money and a lot of inconvenience over many years, thanks to this one book.

    Another book I should mention is Stretching Scientifically.  This is the book I used to be able to do splits for Kick-boxing.  I’ve never come across a better book on how to improve your flexibility in record time.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    10 Big Ideas from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

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    It’s long over-do, but I finally wrote up my 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

    What can I say … the book is a classic.

    I remember when my Dad first recommended that I read The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People long ago.   In his experience, while Tony Robbins was more focused on Personality Ethic, Stephen Covey at the time was more focused on Character Ethic.  At the end of the day, they are both complimentary, and one without the other is a failed strategy.

    While writing 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, I was a little torn on what to keep in and what to leave out.   The book is jam packed with insights, powerful patterns, and proven practices for personal change.   I remembered reading about the Law of the Harvest, where you reap what you sow.  I remembered reading about how to think Win/Win, and how that helps you change the game from a scarcity mentality to a mindset of abundance.   I remembered reading about how we can move up the stack in terms of time management if we focus less on To Dos and more on relationships and results.   I remembered reading about how if we want to be heard, we need to first seek to understand.

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is probably one of the most profound books on the planet when it comes to personal change and empowerment.

    It’s full of mental models and big ideas.  

    What I really like about Covey’s approach is that he bridged work and life.  Rather than splinter our lives, Covey found a way to integrate our lives more holistically, to combine our personal and professional lives through principles that empower us, and help us lead a more balanced life.

    Here is a summary list of 10 Big Ideas from the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People:

    1. The Seven Habits Habits of Effectiveness.
    2. The Four Quadrants of Time Management.
    3. Character Ethic vs. Personality Ethic
    4. Increase the Gap Between Stimulus and Response.
    5. All Things are Created Twice.
    6. The Five Dimensions of Win/Win.
    7. Expand Your Circle of Influence.
    8. Principle-Centered Living.
    9. Four Generations of Time Management.
    10. Make Meaningful Deposits in the Emotional Bank Account.

    In my post, I’ve summarized each one and provided one of my favorite highlights from the book that brings each idea to life.

    Enjoy.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Life Lessons from the Legend of Zelda

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    A fellow Softie, and performance improvement architect extraordinaire, Walter Oelwein, wrote a fantastic article on Life Lessons from The Legend of Zelda and Zelda Theory.

    It’s all about how to apply what we learn from The Legend of Zelda to real life.   If you are a gamer, you will especially appreciate this insightful piece of prose.  Even if you are not a gamer, you will appreciate Walter’s wit and wisdom, as well as his systems thinking.  If you are a continuous leaner and you find yourself always on a path of exploration and execution, this article will directly speak to your heart.

    Check out Life Lessons from the Legend of Zelda and get your game face on for life.

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    Empower Every Person on the Planet to Achieve More

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    It’s great to get back to the basics, and purpose is always a powerful starting point.

    I was listening to Satya Nadella’s keynote at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, and I like how he walked through the Microsoft mission in a mobile-first, cloud-first world.

    Here’s what Satya had to say:

    “Our mission:  Empowering every person and every business on the planet to achieve more.

    (We find that by going back into our history and re-discovering that core sense of purpose, that soul ... a PC in every home, democratizing client/server computing.)

    We move forward to a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world.

    We care about empowerment.

    There is no other ecosystem that is primarily, and solely, built to help customers achieve greatness.

    We are focused on helping our customers achieve greatness through digital technology.

    We care about both individuals and organizations.  That intersection of people and organizations is the cornerstone of what we represent as excellence.

    We are a global company.  We want to make sure that the power of technology reaches every country, every vertical, every organization, irrespective of size.

    There will be many goals.

    What remains constant is this sense of purpose, the reason why this ecosystem exists.

    This is a mission that we go and exercise in a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world.”

    If I think back to why I originally joined Microsoft, it was to empower every person on the planet to achieve more.

    And the cloud is one powerful enabler.

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Intelligence is More Than IQ

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    “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change” -- Charles Darwin

    That's one of my all-time favorite quotes because it's surprising.  It's not the smartest or the strongest, or even the fastest that survive ... it's the most flexible.

    That says a lot about the value of agile and agility in today's world.  I think of agility as the ability to effectively respond to change.

    Intelligence is valuable too, but not just raw smarts.  It's what you do with what you've got.  There are multiple flavors of intelligence, and they can help you survive and thrive in today's world.  Maybe you've heard of emotional intelligence, social intelligence, positive intelligence, or multiple intelligences?

    I think how we look at our own intelligence can limit or enable us.  For example, if you don't think you're intelligent, then you might not try to do intelligent things.  For example, if you've defined intelligence in your own mind to mean something along the lines of "the ability to apply knowledge to manipulate one's environment or to think abstractly as measured by objective criteria", that singular view of intelligence might put a damper on how your view your own abilities (depending on how you scored on your IQ test.)

    I wrote a post on What is Intelligence to elaborate and share what I've learned from Howard Gardner and his definition of intelligence.

    I’d be curious on how your thoughts about intelligence have evolved and changed over the years, given how much of a premium people put on how smart you are.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Value is Everybody’s Job

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    Back in 2010, Gartner suggested that Business Value Realization would be Enterprise Architecture finally done right.  Related, when people were confused by the scope of Value Realization, all we did was add "Business” up front (i.e. “Business Value Realization”) and that seemed to add instant clarity for people, and they said they got it. 

    They realized that it was all about extracting business value and accelerating business value.

    The most interesting pattern I think I see is not that value is an individual thing. 

    It's that any individual can create value in today’s world – with their network, the ways they work, the technology at their fingertips -- they can focus on their end users and continuous learning, and operate without walls. 

    In fact, the enticing promise of the Enterprise Social vision is comprehensive collaboration.

    There was an uprising in the developer world to create customer value -- it was agile. 

    It seems like the world is experiencing another uprising (and you hear Satya Nadella talk about a focus on individuals whether in business or life, focused on learning, collaborating, and changing the world.)

    So it's not the CIO, the CEO, etc.

    What is the new uprising?

    Value is everybody's job.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Sinofsky on How To Analyze the Competition

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    Sometimes the best way to do something well, is to know what to avoid.  In Ex-Windows Boss Steve Sinofsky: Here's Why I Use An iPhone, Nicholas Carlson shares some tips from Steve Sinofsky on analyzing the competition:

    1. Don't use the product in a lightweight manner
    2. Don't think like yourself
    3. Don't bet competitors act similarly (or even rationally)
    4. Don't assume the world is static

    Sinofsky elaborates, and says to use the product deep, and use it over time.  Use the product like it was intended by the designers.  Wrap yourself around the culture, constraints, resources, and more of a competitor.  And, don't take a static view of the world -- the competitor can always update their product based on feedback, or weaknesses you call out.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    The Key to Agility: Breaking Things Down

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    If you find you can't keep up with the world around you, then break things down.  Breaking things down is the key to finishing faster.

    Breaking things down is also the key to agility.

    One of the toughest project management lessons I had to learn was breaking things down into more modular chunks.   When I took on a project, my goal was to make big things happen and change the world. 

    After all, go big or go home, right?

    The problem is you run out of time, or you run out of budget.  You even run out of oomph.  So the worst way to make things happen is to have a bunch of hopes, plans, dreams, and things, sitting in a backlog because they're too big to ship in the time that you've got.

    Which brings us to the other key to agility ... ship things on a shorter schedule.

    This re-trains your brain to chunk things down, flow value, chop dependencies down to size, learn, and, move on.

    Best of all, if you miss the train, you catch the next train.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Change the World by Changing Behaviors

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    If you have an understanding of types of behavior change, you can design more effective software.

    Software is a powerful way to change the world.

    You can change the world with software, a behavior at a time.

    Think of all the little addictive loops, that shape our habits and thoughts on a daily basis. We’re gradually being automated and programmed by the apps we use.

    I’ve seen some people spiral down, a click, a status update, a notification, or a reminder at a time. I’ve seen others spiral up by using apps that teach them new habits, reinforce their good behaviors, and bring out their best.

    To bottom line is, whether you are shaping software or using software on a regular basis, it helps to have a deep understanding of behavior change. You can use this know-how to change your personal habits, lead change management efforts, or build software that changes the world.

    We know change is tough, and it’s a complicated topic, so where do you start?

    A great place to start is to learn the 15 types of behavior change, thanks to Dr. BJ Fogg and his Fogg Behavior Grid.   No worries.  15 sounds like a lot, but it’s actually easy once you understand the model behind it.  It’s simple and intuitive.

    The basic frame works like this.   You figure out whether the behavior change is to do a new behavior, a familiar behavior, increase the behavior, decrease the behavior, or stop dong the behavior.   Within that, you figure out the duration, as in, is this a one-time deal, or is it for a specific time period, or is it something you want to do permanently.

    Here are some examples from Dr. BJ Fogg’s Behavior Grid:

    Do New Behavior

    • Install solar panels on house.
    • Carpool to work for three weeks.
    • Start growing own vegetables.

    Do Familiar Behavior

    • Tell a friend about eco-friendly soap.
    • Bike to work for two months.
    • Turn off lights when leaving room.

    Increase Behavior

    • Plant more trees and local plants.
    • Take public bus for one month.
    • Purchase more local produce.

    Decrease Behavior

    • Buy fewer boxes of bottled water.
    • Take shorter showers this week.
    • Eat less meat from now on.

    Stop Doing a Behavior

    • Turn off space heater for tonight.
    • Don't water lawn during Summer.
    • Never litter again.

    When you know the type of behavior change you’re trying to make, you can design more effective change strategies.

    If you want to change the world, focus on changing behaviors.  If you want to change your world, focus on changing your behaviors. (And, remember, thoughts are behaviors, too.)

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Best-Selling Author on Mental Toughness

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    I’m honored to have a guest post by Jason Selk, Ed.D., on patterns and practices for mental toughness.  Jason is the best-selling author of 10-Minute Toughness and Executive Toughness.  As a trainer of executives, world-class athletes, and business leaders, Jason shares proven practices for mental toughness.  

    Jason is a rock-star in the mental toughness arena in business and in sports.  He is a regular contributor to ABC, CBS, ESPN, and NBC radio and television and he has been featured in USA Today, Men’s Health, Muscle and Fitness, Shape and Self Magazine.

    Mental toughness is what gets you back on your feet again.  Mental toughness is what helps you keep your cool when a bunch of hot air blows your way.  Mental toughness is the stuff that unsung heroes are made of.  Mental toughness is the breakfast of champions.  The beauty is that you can learn and leverage the same proven practices that work for business and for life.

    I think of the tools that Jason shares as the fundamentals.   They may sound like common sense, and yet, they are the ways the work.  The trick is not just knowing what to do, but doing what you know.  I find it much easier to do something that I can believe in, and what I like about Jason’s patterns and practices for mental toughness is that they are tested in action, and they stand the test of time.

    Check out Jason’s post on patterns and practices for mental toughness and get results.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Rounding Up the Greatest Thoughts of All Time

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    I’m on a hunt for the greatest thoughts of all time, expressed as quotes.   I’m a big believer that our language shapes the quality of our lives and that we can shape the landscape of our minds with timeless wisdom and inspirational quotes.

    I especially enjoy little pithy prose, those gems of insight, that remind us of how to live better and operate at a higher level.  I’m a fan of the quotes that really bring out our inner-awesome in work and life.

    Here are a few of my favorite quotes of all time, which reflect some of the greatest thoughts of all time:

    1. “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” — Winston Churchill
    2. “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” — Friedrich Nietzsche
    3. “Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” — Dr. Seuss
    4. “And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” — Abraham Lincoln
    5. “Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by every moment that takes your breath away.” – Anonymous
    6. “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” — Henry David Thoreau
    7. “Life beats down and imprisons the soul and art reminds you that you have one.” — Stella Adler
    8. “If you can’t change your fate, change your attitude.” — Amy Tan
    9. “Courage doesn’t always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, ‘I will try again tomorrow.’” — Mary Anne Radmacher
    10. “The first and best victory is to conquer self. To be conquered by self is, of all things, the most shameful and objectionable.” – Plato

    If you have a favorite quote or thought of all time, feel free to share it with me.   I’m working on my timeless wisdom collection in the background, and I want to make it easy to scan the greatest thoughts of all time.

    It will be a collection of evergreen wisdom at your fingertips.

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  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Video–Ed Jezierski on Getting Results the Agile Way

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    It’s always great to see how technology can help make the world a better place.

    You might remember Ed Jezierski from his Microsoft days.  In his early years at Microsoft, he worked on the Microsoft Developer Support team, helping customers succeed on the platform.    These early experiences taught Ed the value of teamwork and collaboration, extreme customer focus, and the value of principles, patterns, and proven practices for addressing recurring issues, and building more robust designs.

    From there, Ed was one of the early members of the patterns & practices team.  As one of the first Program Managers on the patterns & practices team, Ed was the driving force behind many of the first guides from patterns & practices for developers, including the Data Access guide, and the early Application Architecture guide.  He was also the master mind behind the first application blocks (Exception Management Block, Data Access Block, Caching Block, etc.) , which forever changed the destiny of patterns & practices.  The application blocks helped transition patterns & practices from an IT and system administrator focus,  to a focus on developers and solution architects.  In his role as an Architect, on the patterns & practices team, Ed played a significant role in shaping the technical strategy and orchestrating key design and engineering issues across the patterns & practices portfolio.  One of his most significant impacts was the early design and shaping  of the Microsoft Enterprise Library.

    In his later years, Ed worked on incubation and innovation teams, where he learned a lot about streamlining innovation, making things happen, and how to create systems and processes to support innovation, in a more organic and agile way, to balance more formal engineering practices for bringing ideas and innovation to market.

    But, just like James Bond, “the world is not enough.”  Ed’s passion was always for helping people around the world in a grand scale.  His strength and amazing skill is applying technology to change the world and making the world a better place, by solving solve real-world problems.  (I still remember the day, Ed showed up in his bullet proof armor, ready to deploy technology in some of the most dangerous places in the world.)

    Now, as CTO at InSTEDD, Ed hops around the globe helping communities everywhere design and use technology to continuously improve their health, safety and development.  As you can imagine, Ed has to make things happen in some of the most extreme scenarios, responding to natural disasters and health incidents.  And he uses Getting Results the Agile Way as a system for driving results for himself and the teams he leads.

    Here is Ed Jezierski on Getting Results the Agile Way …

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    How To Be Ready for Any Emergency

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    “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” ― Benjamin Franklin

    I know a lot of people have had their lives turned upside down.   Hurricane Sandy and the follow up Noreaster, really created some setbacks and a wake of devastation.

    Disasters happen.  While you can’t prevent them, what you can do is prepare for them and improve your ability to respond and recover.

    I’m not the expert on disaster preparation, but I know somebody who is.  I’ve asked Laurie Ecklund Long to write a guest post to help people prepare for the worst.  Here it is:

    Disaster Proof Your Life: How To Be Ready for Any Emergency

    The goal of the post is to help jumpstart anybody who wants to start their path to planning and preparation for emergencies. 

    Laurie is an emergency specialist.  She is a best-selling author, national speaker, and trainer that helps individuals, businesses, and the military survive natural disasters and family emergencies, based on her book, My Life in a Box…A Life Organizer.  On a personal level, Laurie’s inspiration came from losing 12 people close to her, including her Dad, within the span of five years.   She learned a lot during 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina, and she’s on a mission to help more people be able to answer the following questions better:

    Do you have a personal emergency tool box?  Can you quickly locate your legal, financial and personal documents within minutes and be able to rebuild your life if something happens to your home?

    Check out Laurie’s guest post Disaster Proof Your Life: How To Be Ready for Any Emergency, and start your path of planning and preparation for emergencies, and help others to do the same.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    The Industry Life Cycle

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    I’m a fan of simple models that help you see things you might otherwise miss, or that help explain how things work, or that simply show you a good lens for looking at the world around you.

    Here’s a simple Industry Life Cycle model that I found in Professor Jason Davis’ class, Technology Strategy (MIT’s OpenCourseWare.)

    image

    It’s a simple backdrop and that’s good.  It’s good because there is a lot of complexity in the transitions, and there are may big ideas that all build on top of this simple frame.

    Sometimes the most important thing to do with a model is to use it as a map.

    What stage is your industry in?

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    The Great Leadership Quotes Collection Revamped

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    A while back I put together a comprehensive collection of leadership quotes.   It’s a combination of the wisdom of the ages + modern sages.   It was time for a revamp.  Here it is:

    The Great Leadership Quotes Collection

    It's a serious collection of leadership quotes and includes lessons from the likes of John Maxwell, Jim Rohn, Lao Tzu, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and more.

    Leadership is Influence

    John Maxwell said it best when he defined leadership as influence.  Tom Peters added a powerful twist to leadership when he said that leadership is not about creating followers—it’s about creating more leaders.

    I like to think of leadership in terms of incremental spheres of influence starting with personal or self-leadership, followed by team leadership, followed by organizational leadership, etc.   Effectively, you can expand your sphere of influence, but none of it really works, if you can’t lead yourself first.

    Leadership is Multi-Faceted (Just Like You)

    I also like to think about the various aspects of leadership, such as Courage, Challenges, Character, Communication, Connection, Conviction, Credibility, Encouragement, Failure, Fear, Heart, Influence, Inspiration, Learning, Self-Leadership, Servant-Leadership, Teamwork, and Vision.  As such, I’ve used these categories to help put the leadership quotes into a meaningful collection with simple themes.

    I’ve also included special sections on What is Leadership, Leadership Defined, and Leading by Example. 

    Sometimes the Source is More Interesting than the Punch line

    While I haven’t counted the leadership quotes, there are a lot.   But they are well-organized and easy to scan.   You’ll notice how the names of famous people that said the leadership quote will pop out at you.  I bolded the names for extra impact and to help you quickly jump to interesting people, to see what they have to say about the art and science of leadership.

    I bet you can find at least three leadership quotes that you can use on a daily basis to think a little better, feel a little better, or do a little better.

    Leadership is Everyone’s Job

    For those of you that think that leadership is something that other people do, or something that gets done to you, or that leadership is a position, I’ll share the words of John Maxwell on this topic:

    “A great leader’s courage to fulfill his vision comes from passion, not position.” —  John Maxwell

    In fact, if you’ve never seen it before or need a quick reminder that everyone is a leader, this is a great video that makes the point hit home:

    Everyone is a Leader

    It’s one of those cool, simple, cartoon videos that shows how leadership is everyone’s job and that without that philosophy, people, systems, organizations, etc. all fail.

    The world moves too fast and things change too much to wait for somebody at the top to tell you what to do.   The closer you are to where the action is, the more context you have, and the more insight you can use to make better decisions and get better results.

    Leadership is a body of principles, patterns, and practices that you can use to empower yourself, and others, with skill.

    Just like a Jedi, your force gets stronger the more you use it.

    If You Want to Grow Your Leadership, Then Give Your Power Away

    But always remember the surprise about leadership – the more you give your power away, the more power that comes back to you.

    It’s not Karma.  It’s caring.  And it’s contagious.

    (As Brian Tracy would say, the three C’s of leadership are Consideration,Caring,and Courtesy.)

    Well, maybe it is like Karma in that what goes around, comes around, and leadership amplifies when you share it with people and help everyone become all that they are capable of.

    Stand strong when tested, and lead yourself from the inside out.

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