In traditional .NET applications developers rely on App.config and Web.config (client and server respectively) to store configuration data that the app depends on during runtime. Developers specify their config info in the <appsettings> section and use ConfiguationManager to access that info.

For Windows Store apps there isn't an exact equivalent for app.config and web.config. However, there are several mechanisms inherent to the Windows Runtime that developers can leverage to accomplish the same functionality.

LOCAL SETTINGS with this API you can get the application settings container in the local app data store.

   1: var localSettings = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.LocalSettings;
   2:  
   3: // Create a simple setting
   4: localSettings.Values["exampleSetting"] = "Hello Windows";
   5:  
   6: // Read data from a simple setting
   7: Object value = localSettings.Values["exampleSetting"];
   8: if (!value)
   9: {
  10:     // No data
  11: }
  12: else
  13: {
  14:     // Access data in value
  15: }
  16:  
  17: // Delete a simple setting
  18: localSettings.Values.Remove("exampleSetting");

You can find the all detail about Local Settings in MSDN.

ROAMING SETTINGS with this API you can get the application settings container in the roadming app data store.

   1: var roamingSettings = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.RoamingSettings;
   2:  
   3: // Create a simple setting
   4: roamingSettings.Values["exampleSetting"] = "Hello World";
   5:  
   6: // Read data from a simple setting
   7: Object value = roamingSettings.Values["exampleSetting"];
   8:  
   9: if (!value)
  10: {
  11:     // No data
  12: }
  13: else
  14: {
  15:     // Access data in value
  16: }
  17:  
  18: // Delete a simple setting
  19: roamingSettings.Values.Remove("exampleSetting");

You can find the all detail about Roaming Settings in MSDN.

PACKAGE.APPXMANIFEST - You can access file resources in app files that you deliver as part of the app package.

   1: async void ReadTimestamp()
   2: {
   3:    try
   4:    {
   5:       StorageFile sampleFile = await localFolder.GetFileAsync("dataFile.txt");
   6:       String timestamp = await FileIO.ReadTextAsync(sampleFile);
   7:       // Data is contained in timestamp
   8:    }
   9:    catch (Exception)
  10:    {
  11:       // Timestamp not found
  12:    }
  13: }

Use the file APIs, such as Windows.Storage.StorageFolder.GetFileAsync,Windows.Storage.StorageFile.GetFileFromApplicationUriAsync and Windows.Storage.FileIO.ReadTextAsync to open and read a file in the local app data store.

LOAD DATA (XML, JASON) AT STARTUP – As a last resort you can HttpClient the configuration file on the fly when the application starts. This may be undesirable due to the connectivity dependency that isn't 100% guaranteed.


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