Maybe it is obvious but I keep my blog articles in OneNote. I've been doing this since OneNote 2007. At that point I had my notebook on a thumb drive so I would always have it with me wherever I went. When we added Skydrive support for OneNote 2010, I moved the blog section "to the cloud" and just left it there. Now I had access to it from any machine with a connection to the internet (which is the point of the cloud, really).

But after a few years my section was starting to get pretty full and scrolling around in it began to be a pain. So this last week I archived everything older than 2 years and structured the last 2 years worth of data to be collapsed.

Here's what I had:

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And so on. I intentionally left this image really large to make my point that I had many pages.

Here's what I wanted and now have:

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Notice the little 'v' arrow next to 2011? That means there are collapsed pages under it. If I click that little 'v', I get the full list of pages back. To make them collapsible I selected all the pages under 2011. To do this, I clicked the first page under the 2011 page, then scrolled down to the last page from the year 2011. I SHIFT+Clicked it - that makes OneNote select all the pages. Then I right clicked the selected list of pages and selected "--> Make Subpage":

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Now the 2011 page becomes the parent page to all the subpages and I get the little 'v' icon. Clicking it causes the entire list to collapse to only show the one parent page.

Then I repeated this for 2012 and 2013.  My habit of using SHIFT+ALT+D to insert the date at the beginning of each page title made this a breeze!

So now my section is nice, neat and ordered. This is not an earth shattering tip, but since I now have a specific case in front of me that helps make my life as a tester easier, I thought I would share. For what it is worth, I had about 100 entries for each of 2011 and 2012, so that is 200 pages that are still present, but not in my default view.

I hope this helps!

Questions, comments, concerns and criticisms always welcome,

John