Just ran across this page after the latest MSDN Flash featuring Jennifer's return (welcome back, Mrs. Marsman!).

 

Titled "Why Develop for Windows Vista", it's a nice summary of why developing applications for Windows Vista is a smart thing. I think this is a new page - or it's new to me anyway. It is based on 3 pillars:

  • Clear
    • Build rich client applications with significantly enhanced user experiences for advanced data visualization and analysis
  • Connected
    • Simplify how you create robust communications  and build service-oriented architectures
  • Confident
    • Create applications with a reduced attack surface and predictable behavior

These are three important high-order architecture considerations. Under each of these pillars is listed a set of capabilities (either .NET 3.0 or Vista specific) and the list is longer than you might think. Some of these are definitely untapped by today's architect / developer, and could make your app stand out in the crowd. Vista is THE platform for serious, modern, mature Smart Clients.

SQL Server Compact

One thing that the Vista summary did not mention is SQL Server Compact (otherwise known as SQLce).  It's not specific to Vista as you can utilize the technology on Windows XP, Windows Mobile, Windows CE, Embedded XP, and others. SQLce has an embedded footprint of 2 MB, and provides a variety of replication models (RDA, Merge) including the newly designed Sync Services. Even if you're not sending data somewhere via replication, it's still the smart choice for a variety of other reasons - small, easily deployed, secure storage and communication, fast queries, and it's FREE.

And in Microsoft style, several product groups are leveraging this technology which should show that SQLce is a solid technical offering to consider in your Smart Client plans, no matter the platform. See Steve Lasker's blog for more info. Feel free to shoot me questions about doing this.

 

MSDN Flash

As I said at the beginning of this post, today's thoughts came about due to my receiving the MSDN Flash in my InBox. I highly recommend everyone register. Every once in a while, I hear from a buddy that they didn't know a technology was coming until it hits - and then I find out that they are not registered. C'mon! Register! It's filtered to show the events in your area, and the topics that you want. With all of the Internet noise, here's a way to get more info in one shot. Take a look at the next link for additional explanation.

Received MSDN Flash from a Friend?

The MSDN Flash is full of pointers to in-depth technical information that we encourage subscribers to forward to friends and co-workers. If you've received this issue from someone via e-mail (or from Jon's blog) and would like to receive the free MSDN Flash newsletter biweekly, all you have to do is register.