There’s a lot of dynamics unfolding before us in the mobility space. Android is putting pressure on iPhone sales, and Gartner says WP7 will catch up with the competitors. Who knows for sure. However, I do feel that Windows Phone 7 is a quality product, and it will only get stronger. And if you’re aware of the Nokia partnership, Microsoft does represent another revenue channel for the mobility developer and ISV’s.

With these issues, is it possible that a iPhone developer would look at Windows Phone 7? Hmmm, not sure. I have my religious technology issues, where I say “I’ll never use technology X, because it comes from company Y and they are our competitor”. (Just ask my family or friends.) But, when life and economics are changing and you have to pay a house note and put food on the table, sometimes you have to be open minded. I don’t know how all of this is going to pan out – nor do I know who will be the main mobility platform players in 5 years. I sure hope that Microsoft is in the game, playing in a quality way. But, if I was feeling pressure about making the next deal happen and I was fearful of my future, you can bet that I would be looking for options. Therefore, an entrepreneur and/or mature consultant will look at other platforms.

So, I’d like to recommend this learning resource for iPhone developers, considering WP7. In case you need to expand your tool belt of skills and business opportunities for the future, take a look – it won’t hurt. We have put together a educational package for the iPhone developer that includes the following:

    • a NEW iPhone/iOS to Windows Phone 7 API mapping tool
      • With this tool, iPhone developers can grab their apps, pick out the iOS API calls, and quickly look up the equivalent classes, methods and notification events in WP7. A developer can search a given iOS API call and find the equivalent WP7 along with C# sample codes and API documentations for both platforms. Give it a try!
    • a 90+ pages “Windows Phone 7 Guide for iPhone Application Developers” white paper, organized in 8 chapters, and growing
    • a series of “developer stories”, in which developers share on video their experience porting iPhone applications to Windows Phone and explain why and how they did it.

I’m not saying “jump ship” or “it’s over!” or anything like that. That would be crazy talk. But, once you see some of the market dynamics and some of our WP7 potential, you might take a quick peek at WP7 and this package will help in the translation.

More coming from the WP7 Interoperability team in the future.