Charlie Brooker of the Guardian (UK) posted a lovely piece called "I hate Macs."

He discusses the UK versions of the Apple "Get a Mac" campaign.

My favorite quotes:

... So when you see the ads, you think, "PCs are a bit rubbish yet ultimately lovable, whereas Macs are just smug, preening tossers." In other words, it is a devastatingly accurate campaign.

And another:

PCs have charm; Macs ooze pretension. When I sit down to use a Mac, the first thing I think is, "I hate Macs", and then I think, "Why has this rubbish aspirational ornament only got one mouse button?"

And:

Ultimately the campaign's biggest flaw is that it perpetuates the notion that consumers somehow "define themselves" with the technology they choose. If you truly believe you need to pick a mobile phone that "says something" about your personality, don't bother. You don't have a personality. A mental illness, maybe - but not a personality.

I kinda feel sorry for him. His inbox is likely to be full right this minute with angry emails from Mac fans.

Good luck, Charlie.

PS. I rarely agree with the way Bill phrases things (I wouldn't be caught dead talking about "Connected Experiences" and the "Digital Decade"), but he's right on, when he asked about the Apple ads:

"Does honesty matter in these things, or if you're really cool, does that mean you get to be a lying person whenever you feel like it?"