• Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    Kinect for Windows SDK v1.7 is Available!

    • 8 Comments

    We are stoked to announce the immediate availability of our latest SDK and Developer Toolkit (v1.7)!  Kinect Interactions (grip and press), Kinect Fusion, new samples for MATLAB, OpenCV and more.

    Download the new hotness here.

    Our product blog has all the details on what we believe is our biggest release since 1.0.

    Ben

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    The latest Kinect for Windows SDK is here

    • 14 Comments

    Yes, it’s the moment many of you have been waiting for: Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7 is available for download! We’ve included a few photos of the key features: Kinect Interactions and Kinect Fusion. Or if you’re a developer, you can download the SDK and get started immediately. 

    A woman demonstrates the new Kinect Interactions, which are included in the Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7: counter-clockwise from top left: “push” to select, “grab” to scroll and pan, and wave to identify primary user. Two-handed zoom (top right) is not included but can be built with this new SDK.
    A woman demonstrates the new Kinect Interactions, which are included in the Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7:
    counter-clockwise from top left: “push” to select, “grab” to scroll and pan, and wave to identify
    primary user. Two-handed zoom (top right) is not included but can be built with this new SDK.

    Kinect Interactions are designed to let users intuitively do things like press their hand forward a few inches to push a button, or close their hands to “grip and pan” as seen here.  Now you can untether yourself and move around a conference room naturally.
    Kinect Interactions are designed to let users intuitively do things like press their hand forward
    a few inches to push a button, or close their hands to “grip and pan” as seen here. Now you
    can untether yourself and move around a conference room naturally.

    In this physical therapy scenario, Kinect for Windows enables a therapist to interact with the computer without leaving her patient’s side.
    In this physical therapy scenario, Kinect for Windows enables a therapist to interact with the
    computer without leaving her patient’s side.

    Customers can virtually try on merchandise, such as sunglasses, by using business solutions created with the new Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7. If colors, models, or sizes are not in stock, you can still see what they look like on you.
    Customers can virtually try on merchandise, such as sunglasses, by using business solutions
    created
    with the new Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7. If colors, models, or sizes are not in
    stock, you can still
    see what they look like on you.

    Kinect Fusion, a tool also included in Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7, can create highly accurate 3-D renderings of people and objects in real time.
    Kinect Fusion, a tool also included in Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7, can create highly accurate
    3-D renderings of people and objects in real time.

    Kinect Fusion makes it possible to create highly accurate 3-D renderings at a fraction of the price it would cost with traditional high-end 3-D scanners.
    Kinect Fusion makes it possible to create highly accurate 3-D renderings at a fraction of the
    price it would cost with traditional high-end 3-D scanners.

    Kinect Fusion opens up a variety of new scenarios for businesses and developers, including augmented reality, 3-D printing, interior and industrial design, and body scanning for things like custom fitting and improved clothes shopping .
    Kinect Fusion opens up a variety of new scenarios for businesses and developers, including
    augmented reality, 3-D printing, interior and industrial design, and body scanning for
    things like custom fitting and improved clothes shopping.

    Kinect Fusion opens up a variety of new scenarios for businesses and developers, including augmented reality,
    3-D printing, interior and industrial design, and body scanning for things like custom fitting and improved clothes shopping .

    The Kinect for Windows Team

    Key Links

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    Kinect for Windows announces new version of SDK coming March 18

    • 12 Comments

    Today at Engadget Expand, I announced that Kinect for Windows SDK 1.7 will be made available this coming Monday, March 18. This is our most significant update to the SDK since we released the first version a little over a year ago, and I can’t wait to see what businesses and developers do with the new features and enhancements.

    On Monday, developers will be able to download the SDK, developer toolkit, and the new and improved Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) from our website. In the meantime, here’s a sneak peek:

    Kinect Interactions give businesses and developers the tools to create intuitive, smooth, and polished applications that are ergonomic and intelligently based on the way people naturally move and gesture. The interactions include push-to-press buttons, grip-to-pan capabilities, and support for smart ways to accommodate multiple users and two-person interactions. These new tools are based on thousands of hours of research, development, and testing with a broad and diverse group of people. We wanted to save businesses and developers hours of development time while making it easier for them to create gesture-based experiences that are highly consistent from application to application and utterly simple for end users. With Kinect Interactions, businesses can more quickly develop customized, differentiated solutions that address important business needs and attract, engage, and delight their customers.

    Kinect for Windows Interactions transform how people interact with computers in settings ranging from retail to education, training, and physical therapy.
    Kinect for Windows Interactions transform how people interact with computers in
    settings ranging from retail to education, training, and physical therapy.

    Kinect Fusion is one of the most affordable tools available today for creating accurate 3-D renderings of people and objects. Kinect Fusion fuses together multiple snapshots from the Kinect for Windows sensor to create accurate, full, 3-D models. Developers can move a Kinect for Windows sensor around a person, object, or environment and “paint” a 3-D image of the person or thing in real time. These 3-D images can then be used to enhance countless real-world scenarios, including augmented reality, 3-D printing, interior and industrial design, and body scanning for things such as improved clothes shopping experiences and better-fitting orthotics. Kinect Fusion is something many of our partners have been asking for and we’re thrilled to be delivering it now.

    Kinect Fusion enables developers to create accurate 3-D renderings in real time.Kinect Fusion enables developers to create accurate 3-D renderings in real time.

    The updated SDK also includes an enhanced developer toolkit and additional developer resources, including:

    • OpenCV and MATLAB Samples to allow developers to build advanced Kinect-enabled applications while using industry standards.
    • Kinect for Windows Code Samples on CodePlex, marking the first time that select Kinect for Windows code samples will be available through an open-source resource, enabling existing and potential partners to explore and develop new scenarios.

    Seeing is believing
    We demonstrated Kinect Interactions and Kinect Fusion live, onstage at Engadget Expand. You can watch the webcast of those demos now—and then come back to download the latest SDK on March 18. It’s fully compatible with all previous commercial releases, so we encourage everyone to upgrade to the new version. There’s no reason not to!

    As always, we are constantly evolving the technology and want to know what you think. And we love hearing about the solutions you’re developing with Kinect for Windows, so please join us at Facebook and Twitter.

    The Kinect for Windows sensor, together with the SDK, can help you create engaging applications that take natural voice and gesture computing to the next level.

    Bob Heddle, Director
    Kinect for Windows

    Key Links

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    What's Up with CodePlex?

    • 2 Comments

    Last week we announced the release of the source code of 22 Kinect for Windows sample applications.  The developer response has been terrific and much larger than we expected.

    Some publications claimed we had open sourced “all of the code for Kinect” or the “core code of Kinect”.  Neither of these is true.  We released source code for most of our sample applications.  It’s important to understand that sample code is not the same as core code.  The purpose of the sample applications is to give developers examples of how to use particular APIs and/or to give a good starting point for a new application.  Samples do use the core APIs and Kinect for Windows platform but we have not changed anything about the licensing of those underlying components.



    The samples we’ve released show how to do things like get raw infrared data from the sensor, build an interactive kiosk that changes content when a person is detected, and track a person’s facial movements.  The samples are one of the many areas in which we are investing to make it easy for new and seasoned developers alike to build applications using Kinect for Windows.

    It was not our intention for our announcement to be misinterpreted.  It’s evident in the comments of many posts that readers understood the distinction.  It’s also been great to see the debate & discussions (I’m looking at you, Reddit :-).

    We are following up with some publications to clarify our announcement and to request they update their posts.

     

    Ben

    @benlower | kinectninja@microsoft.com | mobile:  +1 (206) 659-NINJA (6465)

    Kinect for Windows:  @KinectWindows

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    Kinect for Windows Academic Pricing Update

    • 2 Comments

    Shortly after the commercial release of Kinect for Windows in early 2012, Microsoft announced the availability of academic pricing for the Kinect for Windows sensor to higher education faculty and students for $149.99 at the Microsoft Store in the United States. We are now pleased to announce that we have broadened the availability of academic pricing through Microsoft Authorized Educational Resellers (AERs).

    Most of these resellers have the capability to offer academic pricing directly to educational institutions; academic researchers; and students, faculty, and staff of public or private K-12 schools, vocational schools, junior colleges, colleges, universities, and scientific or technical institutions. In the United States, eligible institutions are accredited by associations that are recognized by the US Department of Education and/or the State Board of Education. Academic pricing on the Kinect for Windows sensor is currently available through AERs in the United States, Taiwan, and Hong Kong SAR.

    Within the academic community, the potential of Kinect for Windows in the classroom is generating a lot of excitement. Researchers and academia in higher education collaborate with Microsoft Research on a variety of projects that involve educational uses of Kinect for Windows. The educator driven community resource, KinectEDucation, encourages developers, teachers, students, enthusiasts and any other education stakeholders to help transform classrooms with accessible technology.
     
    One such development is a new product from Kaplan Early Learning Company, the Inspire-NG Move, bundled with the Kinect for Windows sensor. This bundle includes four educational programs for children age three years and older. The programs make it possible for children to experience that hands-on, kinesthetic play with a purpose makes learning fun. The bundle currently sells for US$499.

    “We’re excited about the new learning models that are enabled by Kinect for Windows,” stated Chris Gerblick, vice president of IT and Professional Services at Kaplan Early Learning Company. “We see the Inspire NG-Move family of products as excellent learning tools for both the classroom and the home.”

    With the availability of academic pricing, we look forward to many developments from the academic community that integrate Kinect for Windows into interactive educational experiences.

    Michael Fry
    Business Development, Strategic Alliances
    Kinect for Windows

    Key Links

     

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    Easy Access to Kinect for Windows Sample Code

    • 23 Comments

    We are happy to announce we are releasing the Kinect for Windows samples under an open source license.  You can find everything on CodePlex: http://kinectforwindows.codeplex.com/.  We have posted a total of 22 unique samples in C#, C++, and Visual Basic.

    We’re doing this for a few reasons:

    1. Easy Access -> we will continue to release our sample applications as part of our Developer Toolkit.  However, that’s a large download & install that can be cumbersome if you just want to quickly view or access code on the web
    2. Reuse The Code -> we’re releasing all the samples under an Apache 2.0 license so that you can take the code and reuse, remix, etc.  Also, we’re using a Git repository so it’s easy clone & fork if you want
    3. Get Feedback -> we will use CodePlex's built-in feedback & discussion tools to get community input on the samples.  We want to hear from you to understand what we can do better with the samples
    4. Faster Updates -> we will be able to update samples more quickly on CodePlex (compared to Toolkit releases).  CodePlex also has a “Subscribe” feature that enables you to follow the project and get notified when something changes, a bug gets fixed, someone says something smart in the discussions, etc.  (note:  the subscription feature doesn’t actually track the smartness of a post but one can dream :-))

     

    Browse K4W sample code right in your browser...  


     
    Oh Yeah, This Blog is New

    You probably noticed:  this is our first blog post.  We are committed to this blog becoming a useful resource to the Kinect for Windows development community.  Our existing product blog (at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kinectforwindows/) will continue to focus on announcements, product news, and highlighting great, real-world uses of Kinect for Windows.  The developer blog (where you are now) will focus on going behind the scenes with the K4W engineering team and will go deeper on the technology and APIs, share tips & tricks, and provide other tidbits of information relevant to those building K4W applications.

    We have ideas in mind for future posts but would love to hear from you to understand what topics would be most useful to you.  Please use the comments below, hit up the team on Twitter @KinectWindows, or get in touch with me directly (contact info below).

     

    Ben

    @benlower | kinectninja@microsoft.com | mobile:  +1 (206) 659-NINJA (6465)

  • Kinect for Windows Product Blog

    Kinect Fusion demonstrated at Microsoft Research TechFest, coming soon to SDK

    • 9 Comments

    Revealed in November as a future addition to the Kinect for Windows SDK, Kinect Fusion made a big impression at the annual TechFest event hosted by Microsoft Research this week in Redmond, Washington.

    Kinect Fusion pulls depth data that is generated by the Kinect for Windows sensor and, from the sequence of frames, constructs a highly detailed 3-D map of objects or environments. The tool averages readings over hundreds or even thousands of frames to create a rich level of detail.

    The Kinect Fusion project, shown during TechFest 2013, enables high-quality scanning and reconstruction of 3-D models using just a handheld Kinect for Windows sensor.
    Kinect Fusion, shown during TechFest 2013, enables high-quality scanning and reconstruction of
    3-D models using just a handheld Kinect for Windows sensor and the Kinect for Windows SDK.

    "The amazing thing about this solution is how you can take an off-the-shelf Kinect for Windows sensor and create 3-D models rapidly," said Shahram Izadi, senior researcher at Microsoft Research Cambridge. "Normally when you think of Kinect, you think of a static sensor in a living room. But with Kinect Fusion, we allow the user to hold the camera, explore their space, and rapidly scan the world around them."

    When scanning smaller objects, you also have the option to simply move the object instead of the sensor.

    The Cambridge researchers and Kinect for Windows team collaborated closely on Kinect Fusion to construct a tool that can enable businesses and developers to devise new types of applications.

    "This has been a wonderful example of collaboration between Microsoft Research and our product group," said Kinect for Windows Senior Program Manager Chris White. "We have worked shoulder-to-shoulder over the last year to bring this technology to our customers. The deep engagement that we have maintained with the original research team has allowed us to incorporate cutting edge research, even beyond what was shown in the original Kinect Fusion paper."

    "This kind of collaboration is one of the unique strengths of Microsoft, where we can bring together world-class researchers and world-class engineers to deliver real innovation," White added. "Kinect Fusion opens up a wide range of development possibilities—everything from gaming and augmented reality to industrial design. We're really excited to be able to include it in a future release of the Kinect for Windows SDK."

    Kinect for Windows team

    Key Links

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