This Week in Sustainability—Report Finds Storm Surge Risk Amplified by Climate Change and Meteorologists Change Climate Conversation

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This Week in Sustainability—Report Finds Storm Surge Risk Amplified by Climate Change and Meteorologists Change Climate Conversation

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imageEight years ago, the world watched in shock as Hurricane Katrina caused insurmountable damage to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A recent study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences estimates that storm surges such as the one seen during Katrina, are directly related to climate change. Reported by Huffington Post, a careful analysis of global temperature changes and regional sea surface temperatures has shown that changes to the climate during the past 100 years has already doubled the risk of storms the magnitude of Katrina. This news serves as another example of how technology is able to improve our understanding of climate change, while underscoring the importance of taking steps to address global warming.

Outside of the scientific community, the public often has a more limited understanding of the impact of climate change. That’s beginning to change as organizations such as the Weather Channel, which delicately balances breaking news reports with scientific explanation, is beginning to discuss how climate change is affecting weather patterns. FastCoExist wrote an article on how the Weather Channel may be changing the conversation surrounding climate change. Last October’s Superstorm Sandy presented an opportunity for TV meteorologists to discuss the climactic causes of a particular weather pattern. By using the sophisticated technology available and presenting the facts to their broad audience, the Weather Channel is actively engaging others and can likely make an impact on climate change awareness, a topic unlikely to lose momentum anytime soon.

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