Microsoft
Green Blog

The Official Blog of Microsoft's
Environmental Sustainability Team

April, 2013

  • Microsoft Green Blog

    Earth Day 2013 – Reflecting On Our Commitment to Sustainability

    • 4 Comments

    For the past several years, I’ve used Earth Day as an opportunity to look at Microsoft’s progress on environmental sustainability issues over the past 12 months and where we are headed in the year to come.

    The most significant progress to report is around Microsoft’s work to achieve carbon neutrality in our current fiscal year. We announced this commitment last year. I’m excited we made the commitment and are on track to meet it, but I am even more excited about how we’re meeting it. We are one of the very first companies to put an internal price on carbon emissions, which provides our business and operational groups more awareness and incentives to conserve energy and seek renewable power. The fee enables us to invest in renewable energy credits and certified offset projects to meet our carbon neutrality goal. I attended the UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen a few years ago where the nations of the world tried and failed to achieve a global system for addressing greenhouse gas emissions. With that in mind, I’m struck that Microsoft is one of very few organizations in the world today imposing a carbon fee across operations in 100+ countries in a way that makes economic and environmental sense. 

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  • Microsoft Green Blog

    This Week in Sustainability: How Climate Change Impacts Public Health and Business

    • 1 Comments

    clip_image002As people’s attention turned toward climate change this week with Earth Day this past Monday, several media outlets highlighted issues related to climate change that impact more than the weather. Climate change is a real health concern, according to The Guardian, as an increased amount of evidence frames climate change as a public health risk. GreenBiz also explained the business-related issues tied to extreme weather. Read on to learn more about climate change concerns.

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  • Microsoft Green Blog

    EPA Names Microsoft Leading Green Energy Purchaser

    • 1 Comments

    clip_image002For the second consecutive year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has named Microsoft to its Green Power Partnership Top 50 List—and this year our ranking increased to second on the Top 50 List.

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  • Microsoft Green Blog

    Steve Ballmer: How Microsoft Is Doing Well by Doing Good

    • 1 Comments

    clip_image002This week Business Roundtable, an association of chief executive officers of top U.S. companies, published its 2013 reporton how many of the U.S.’s top companies are addressing sustainability challenges. The report includes a letter from Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, who outlines how Microsoft is using technology to reduce its carbon footprint and how technology can achieve gains in energy efficiency.

    Business Roundtable is a who’s who of American business. The companies represented by the organization comprise more than $7.3 trillion in annual revenue and combined represent nearly one-third of the total value of the U.S. stock market. The key theme in this year’s report—which is entitled “Create, Grow, Sustain: How Companies Are Doing Well by Doing Good”—is that companies are making a difference in their communities, developing products that improve lives and are pursuing socially responsible business practices.

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  • Microsoft Green Blog

    How Windows Azure is Helping Manage Solar Energy Generation in Japan

    • 1 Comments

    clip_image002Solar energy is taking off in Japan. In fact, last year nearly 3 GW of photovoltaics were installed across the country. The country’s tight power supply and demand situation—the vast majority of nuclear generation was taken offline following the Fukushima disaster—has made managing energy generation a very important issue. That’s one reason why the town of Nichinan in Hino-gun, Tottori Prefecture, has turned to the Windows Azure cloud service as part of the energy management system for its new solar power station.

    Since the Fukushima disaster in 2011, Japan has doubled down on efforts to expand the country’s renewable energy production. Before the earthquake and tsunami critically damaged the nuclear power plant at Fukushima, Japan received as much as 30 percent of its energy from nuclear power and planned to expand nuclear generation to 50 percent of the country’s energy needs.

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