9780735626829fHere’s a post about the newly published Introducing Windows 7 for Developers, by Yochay Kiriaty, Laurence Moroney, Sasha Goldshtein and Alon Fliess. (The book’s ISBN is 9780735626829, and it contains 416 pages.)

You can read the Foreword by Mark Russinovich here.

Today we’d like to share some other excerpts from the book. First, here is the book’s full Table of Contents:

 

Table of Contents
Foreword..........................................xiii
Acknowledgments ............................xv
Introduction.......................................xvii

1 Welcome to Windows 7..................1
What Has Changed Since Windows Vista? ........................................................1
Seven Ways to Shine on Windows 7................................................................3
Taskbar...................................................................................................4
Libraries .................................................................................................6
Touch, Multitouch, and Gestures...................................................................8
Sensor and Location ..................................................................................9
Ribbon ...............................................................................................................10
Enhanced Graphics Platform............................................................................ 13
Improved Fundamentals ................................................................................... 15
Summary........................................................................................................ 18

2 Integrate with the Windows 7 Taskbar: Basic Features ................ 19
Design Goals of the Windows 7 Taskbar................................................................. 21
A Feature Tour of the Windows 7 Taskbar ............................................................. 21
Jump Lists .............................................................................................................. 22
Taskbar Overlay Icons and Progress Bars ..................................................... 25
Thumbnail Toolbars............................................................................................ 26
Live Window Thumbnails.................................................................................. 27
Backward Compatibility .................................................................................... 29
Integrating with the Windows 7 Taskbar................................................................ 30
Application ID....................................................................................................... 30
Taskbar Progress Bars and Overlay Icons ..................................................... 35
Summary...................................................................................................... 40

3 Integrate with the Windows 7 Taskbar: Advanced Features..............43
Jump Lists ................................................................................................... 43
Anatomy of a Jump List..................................................................................... 44
Recent and Frequent Destinations ................................................................. 45
Custom Destinations........................................................................................... 49
User Tasks .............................................................................................................. 53
Thumbnail Toolbars................................................................................................ 56
Customizing Thumbnails................................................................................... 59
Thumbnail Clipping ............................................................................................ 61
Custom Thumbnails ............................................................................................ 62
Custom Live Previews.................................................................................................... 65
Window Switchers.......................................................................................................... 66
Summary.................................................................................................................. 71

4 Organize My Data: Libraries in Windows 7.......................................73
Windows Explorer ............................................................................................ 73
Changes Made to Windows Explorer in Windows 7................................. 75
Welcome to Libraries ........................................................................................ 77
Libraries under the Hood ................................................................................. 79
Working with Libraries....................................................................................... 84
Summary............................................................................................100

5 Touch Me Now: An Introduction to Multitouch Programming.............. 101
Multitouch in Windows 7 ...................................................................101
Windows 7 Multitouch Programming Models..................................................104
The Good Model: Supporting Legacy Applications ................................104
The Better Model: Enhancing the Touch Experience..............................105
The Best Model: Experience Optimized for Multitouch ........................106
How Multitouch Works in Windows 7...................................................................106
Architecture Overview: Messages Data Flow ............................................107
Supporting Legacy Applications ...................................................................108
Working with Gestures ...............................................................................110
Handling the WM_GESTURE Message.........................................................111
Use the Pan Gesture to Move an Object ....................................................113
Use the Zoom Gesture to Scale an Object .................................................115
Use the Rotate Gesture to Turn an Object.................................................117
Use a Two-Finger Tap to Mimic a Mouse Click ........................................119
Use the Press-and-Tap Gesture to Mimic a Mouse Right-Click ..........121
Configuring Windows 7 Gestures.................................................................121
Summary.............................................................................................124

6 Touch Me Now: Advanced Multitouch Programming................127
Working with Raw Touch Messages..........................................................127
Setting Up Windows for Touch.....................................................................128
Unpacking WM_TOUCH Messages ..............................................................129
Using the Manipulation and Inertia Engines .......................................................135
Multitouch Architecture: The Complete Picture, Part 1 ........................136
Using Manipulation ..........................................................................................138
Using Inertia........................................................................................................144
Multitouch Architecture: The Complete Picture, Part 2 ........................145
Summary...............................................................................................151

7 Building Multitouch Applications in Managed Code..................153
Building Your First Touch-Sensitive Application ................................................153
Using Windows 7 Touch to Move an Object .......................................................155
Using Windows 7 Touch to Scale an Object ........................................................158
Using Windows 7 Touch to Rotate an Object......................................................160
Using Inertia with Gestures ...........................................................................161
Extending for Multiple Objects................................................................................164
Building a Gesture-Enabled Picture Control ........................................................165
Using the Gesture-Enabled Picture Control.........................................................168
Classes to Support Touch and Gestures ...................................................170
UIElement Additions.........................................................................................171
Summary....................................................................................................172

8 Using Windows 7 Touch with Silverlight ........................................173
Introducing Silverlight........................................................................173
Creating Your First Silverlight Application ...........................................................176
Building Out-of-Browser Applications in Silverlight ..............................179
Using the Silverlight InkPresenter Control ...........................................................183
An Example of Ink Annotation in Silverlight.............................................184
Silverlight Ink Classes for JavaScript Programmers.................................185
Programming for Ink in Silverlight ..............................................................189
Using the Touch APIs in Silverlight.........................................................195
Expanding the Application for Multitouch................................................196
Summary...................................................................................................200

9 Introduction to the Sensor and Location Platform ..................... 201
Why Sensors?.........................................................................................................201
A Word on Security...........................................................................................203
Architecture of the Sensor and Location Platform.............................................204
What Is a Sensor?..........................................................................................205
Working with Sensors .................................................................................................207
Integrating Sensors into Your Application ................................................207
Discovering Sensors ..........................................................................................207
Requesting Sensor Permissions.....................................................................213
Interacting with Sensors ..................................................................................218
Reading Sensor Data Using Managed Code..............................................227
Ambient Light Sensor Application ...............................................................230
Summary...........................................................................................232

10 Tell Me Where I Am: Location-Aware Applications .................... 233
Why Location Awareness Is So Important ............................................................233
Location Platform Architecture................................................................................234
Location Devices Are Regular Windows 7 Sensors..................................237
Location Information Is Sensitive Information .........................................238
Working with the Location API................................................................................239
Understanding How the Location API Works ...........................................239
Requesting Location Permissions .................................................................242
Interacting with the Location Interface ......................................................244
Putting It All Together.....................................................................................254
Writing a Location-Aware Application Using .NET ............................................255
Reading Location Reports and Handling Location Events ....................257
Using the Enhanced Default Location Provider Tool for Testing........259
Summary 260

11 Develop with the Windows Ribbon, Part 1 ................................... 263
History .................................................................................................................263
Using the Ribbon............................................................................................267
Programming with the Windows Ribbon Framework ......................................273
Ribbon Markup ..................................................................................................275
Summary............................................................................................................307

12 Develop with the Windows Ribbon, Part 2 ....................................309
Programming the Ribbon..........................................................................................309
The Minimal Ribbon Revisited.......................................................................310
Initialization Phase ............................................................................................316
Handling Ribbon Callbacks.............................................................................318
The Property System ........................................................................................320
Setting Properties Directly or Indirectly.....................................................322
Controlling Controls .........................................................................................325
Setting Application Mode, and Showing Contextual Tabs and Pop-Ups ..........347
Summary.....................................................................................................353

13 Rediscover the Fundamentals: It’s All About Performance .......355
Instrumentation and Diagnostics ............................................................................356
Performance Counters .....................................................................................356
Windows Management Instrumentation...................................................362
Event Tracing for Windows ............................................................................365
Windows Performance Toolkit ......................................................................365
Troubleshooting Platform ..............................................................................369
Performance and Efficiency.......................................................................................371
Background Services and Trigger Start Services ......................................372
Power Management .........................................................................................378
Summary.........................................................................................................382

Index.................................................................................................383

And here’s a stretch of text from Chapter 7:

Chapter 7
Building Multitouch Applications in Managed Code

In Chapters 5 and 6, you looked at touch-based applications—in particular, the new multitouch
capabilities that are available in the Windows 7 operating system—and how to program
applications to take advantage of Windows 7 multitouch features.

Perhaps you’re not really that into writing in C++, or perhaps you already have applications
that are written in managed code and would like to be able to use them with multitouch. This
chapter will look at how you can build applications with multitouch in mind using the Microsoft
.NET Framework and, in particular, the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)
version 4.

Instead of making a dry run through the features, you’re going to get hands-on experience
right away and learn by doing. So fire up Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and let’s get going.

Building Your First Touch-Sensitive Application

Visual Studio 2010 supports the ability to create WPF Windows applications. You can do this
from the File menu. Select New Project, and the New Project Types dialog box opens. Make
sure that you’ve selected .NET Framework 4.0 as the target framework (on the top right side),
and select WPF Application from the available templates.

image

Visual Studio creates a basic WPF client application for you containing a couple of XAML files:
App.xaml, which contains the application definition, and MainWindow.xaml, which defines the
application UI. You’ll edit MainWindow.xaml in this section.

Let’s take a look at the basic XAML that is created for you in Window1.xaml:

<Window x:Class="Chapter7_Sample1.MainWindow"
xmlns="
http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
Title="MainWindow" Height="300" Width="300">
<Grid>
</Grid>
</Window>

This example defines the window and the code that supports it. In this case, you can see that
the class that implements this code is Chapter7Sample1.Window1. This code resides in the
code-behind file called MainWindow.xaml.cs. We’ll look at that in a moment.

The attributes on the Window element define the namespaces for the XAML code so that the
XAML can be validated by the Visual Studio compiler. Finally, some basic properties such as
Title, Height, and Width are set.

XAML in WPF supports a number of controls that allow you to command how the user interface
is laid out. The Grid control is one of these; it allows you to define how your controls are
laid out within defined cells. These controls can be placed anywhere within any of the cells. If
the Grid control is used, as it is here, without cells (that is, defined using rows and columns),
you should consider it a single-cell grid where only one control will be displayed.

Let’s add a control to this grid. We’ll add a rectangle in it, like this:

<Rectangle Width="100" Height="100" Fill="Red"></Rectangle>

This defines a 100 by 100 rectangle (also known as a square), which will appear centered
within the single default cell of the grid. You can see the result in the following screen shot:

image

If you’re thinking that this isn’t very interesting, you’re right. So let’s make it a little more interesting
by making it touch sensitive. You can manipulate an object using touch in Windows
7 in a number of ways, but we’ll start with the simplest—moving it around the screen.

Using Windows 7 Touch to Move an Object

In the previous section, you built a (very) simple Windows 7 WPF application that rendered a
red rectangle on the screen. Now you’re going to add the first step of basic touch input by
adding the code that allows you to move the rectangle around the screen using touch.

First you need to inform Windows that you want to be able to manipulate the rectangle using
the touch system. You do this in XAML with the IsManipulationEnabled attribute. This is a
Boolean value, and should be set to ‘true’ if you want to manipulate an object
using multi touch.

<Rectangle Width="100" Height="100" Fill="Red" IsManipulationEnabled="True" ></Rectangle>

You’re going to make one more change to the rectangle, and that is to add a named Render-
Transform
object that is defined by a MatrixTransform that does nothing. You’ll see shortly
that this transform can be manipulated to provide the drawing functionality that changes the
shape or location of the rectangle upon user input. The MatrixTransform object is defined as
an application resource, so if you look at your App.xaml file, you’ll see a section for resources
(called Application.Resources), where you can add the MatrixTransform object.

Here’s the code:

<Application.Resources>
<MatrixTransform x:Key="InitialMatrixTransform">
<MatrixTransform.Matrix>
<Matrix OffsetX="0" OffsetY="0"/>
</MatrixTransform.Matrix>
</MatrixTransform>
</Application.Resources>

As you can see, this matrix transform doesn’t do anything. If you apply it to the rectangle,
nothing happens. However, later in the code example, you’ll manipulate the transform, and it,
in turn, will manipulate the rectangle.

Here’s how the rectangle XAML should look with the transform applied:

<Rectangle Width="100" Height="100" Fill="Red" ManipulationMode="All"
RenderTransform="{StaticResource InitialMatrixTransform}"></Rectangle>

Now that the rectangle is configured to allow manipulation, the next step is to set up what
the window needs to capture manipulation events from the operating system. These are captured
using the ManipulationDelta event. Add this, and specify a handler to the Window tag
at the root of the XAML for Window1.xaml.

It should look something like this:

<Window x:Class="Chapter7_Sample1.Window1"
xmlns="
http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300" ManipulationDelta="Window_ManipulationDelta">

When you created the ManipulationDelta event handler on the Window just shown, Visual
Studio should have created a stub function for you. If it didn’t (for example, if you cut and
pasted the attribute declaration instead of typing it), you can see it here:

private void Window_ManipulationDelta(object sender, ManipulationDeltaEventArgs e)
{
}

If you’re familiar with .NET programming, this code will look familiar. It’s a typical event handler
that takes a general object called sender, which refers to the object that the event was
raised on, and an object containing the event arguments (that is, the metadata associated
with the event).

In this case, you get a ManipulationDeltaEventArgs object. This object exposes a function
called GetDeltaManipulation, which returns a Manipulation object that contains exactly the
metadata that you need to understand what the user has done to the object.

Here’s how you can get a handle on the manipulation that has just been performed:

ManipulationDelta m = e.DeltaManipulation;

Next, you want to get a reference to your rectangle, and to the Matrix that defines its Render-
Transform
. Here’s the code:

Rectangle r = e.OriginalSource as Rectangle;
Matrix matrix = ((MatrixTransform)r.RenderTransform).Matrix;

The Manipulation object exposes a Translation property that returns a Vector object, which
has member properties for the translation on X and Y that results from the user’s action of
moving the object. To move the object, you should call the Translate method on the matrix.
(Remember from the code shown earlier, that the matrix here is the RenderTransform from
the rectangle.) Here’s the relevant code:

matrix.Translate(m.Translation.X, m.Translation.Y);

And now all you need to do is set the RenderTransform for the rectangle to be the new matrix
(that is, the one that has been manipulated by the Translation function):

r.RenderTransform = new MatrixTransform(matrix);

And that’s it. Now, all you have to do is implement this event handler and you can move the
rectangle based on user input from the touch screen! Here’s the full event handler:

private void Window_ManipulationDelta(object sender, ManipulationDeltaEventArgs e)
{
Manipulation m = e.GetDeltaManipulation(this);
Rectangle r = e.OriginalSource as Rectangle;
Matrix matrix = ((MatrixTransform)r.RenderTransform).Matrix;
matrix.Translate(m.Translation.X, m.Translation.Y);
r.RenderTransform = new MatrixTransform(matrix);
}

Now if you run your application, you can move the rectangle around the window by touching
the screen with your finger! Here’s an illustration of how it works:

image

In the next section, you add to this to see how the multitouch system accepts scaling information
that allows you to change the size of the object.

>   >   >

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Enjoy the book!