February, 2010

"Welcome

  • Microsoft Press

    Visual Studio 2010 RC available via MSDN

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    Here’s another quick post today, just to let you know that the Visual Studio 2010 & .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate is now available to MSDN subscribers . For more information on this RC, see Jason Zander’s blog (and check Somasegar’s blog later). The Release Candidate will be available to the public on February 10. Here's a link to a survey via which you can give feedback about the RC: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=183244 .
  • Microsoft Press

    Ebook for Richter’s CLR via C#, Third Edition, now available

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    Many of you have written to ask whether an ebook for Jeffrey Richter’s CLR via C#, Third Edition (Print ISBN: 978-0-7356-2704-8; 896 pages), would be available for sale and, if yes, when. Here’s a quick post to say that the ebook (in multiple formats) is now available here . You can purchase the ebook at a discount if you buy the book, or you can purchase the ebook separately. Enjoy!
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #6: Don't reign in effort-driven scheduling when it shouldn't apply

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    Carl here. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series, which started like this: #10 , #9 , #8 , and #7 . Problem #6: Don't reign in effort-driven scheduling when it shouldn't apply Some things make perfect sense in one context but perfect nonsense in a different context. Effort-driven scheduling is one such thing. It's a powerful feature in Project that you should know well. The basic idea of effort-driven scheduling (or EDS to its friends) is simple enough: if one person working full-time on one task should take, say, 20 days to complete...
  • Microsoft Press

    Nine-year-old boy going for his fifth Microsoft certification

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    Something lighthearted for the weekend: Check out this Gizmodo article on Markos Calasan . “He's nine years old and lives in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. He's also Microsoft Certified four times over and working on his fifth certificate.” (Thanks to Kyle VanHemert, the author of the post, who can be reached at kvanhemert@gizmodo.com .)
  • Microsoft Press

    Over 200 DRM-free Microsoft Press ebooks now available

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    When you buy an ebook, you get lifetime access to the book, and whenever possible we provide it to you in four, DRM-free file formats—PDF, .epub, Kindle-compatible .mobi, and Android .apk ebook—that you can use on the devices of your choice. Our ebook files are fully searchable, and you can cut-and-paste and print them....
  • Microsoft Press

    I. M. Wright: “Are we functional?”

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    “When Steven Sinofsky and Jon DeVaan took on joint management of Windows 7, they made several significant changes to the entire organization. Two profound changes were creating a single centralized plan and switching to a functional organizational structure. Given the success of Windows 7, some Microsoft engineers are asking, ‘If my PUM is a bum—is it time to throw the bums out?’"...
  • Microsoft Press

    Jeffrey Richter: Excerpt #2 from CLR via C#, Third Edition

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    "Today I thought I’d share a section a section from Chapter 23, 'Assembly Loading and Reflection,' with you. This section discusses how to embed your application’s dependent DLLs inside your EXE file, simplifying deployment by allowing you to distribute just one physical file."...
  • Microsoft Press

    Ed Wilson: What is an Author?

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    What is an author? What a seemingly silly question. Obviously an author is someone who writes something! Various scholars used to envision an author as someone who sat in an enclosed room, isolated from society who produced a document that sprang forth from the imagination. With this view of authorship, it was important to learn as much as possible about the person who did the writing, to learn about the authors experiences, imagination, and scholastic achievements. In short the author was a person, and the more we know about the author, the more we are able to understand the writing. A more recent school of thought dismisses the notion of the writer in an enclosed room, isolated from society who works on a document in isolation, and instead moves to the other end of the spectrum. The author...
  • Microsoft Press

    Carl Chatfield: Top 10 Problems, #7: Don’t distinguish work from duration

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    Carl here again. ProjHugger is for Microsoft Office Project newbies, enthusiasts, and zealots. I publish new posts every Monday morning, but you can add comments any time. This week’s ProjHugger post continues the “Top 10 problems new (and not so new) Project users have, and what you can do to ease the pain” series, which started like this: #10 , #9 , and #8 . And here’s #7: Problem #7: Don't distinguish work from duration Project measures both duration and work values in increments of time, but duration gets a lot more visibility in the Project UI. In fact work only steps into the picture when you assign a resource to a task, and even then you need to dig a little to see work values. When you assign resources in your project plans, you may need to clearly distinguish the amount of work the...
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