... almost anywhere (ie on any search engine) and my name will come up. I posted a while back about my use of a key word (turnip) to circumvent my send-delay in Outlook. So if I want to send a mail immediately I embed "turnip" somewhere in the text. Often it appears at the end and is quite likely to cause offence - along the lines of:

Yes thanks, I do know what I'm doing.

turnip

Difficult to know whether I'm referring to myself as turnip, the recipient as turnip or I'm just randomly inserting vegetable names into my emails. Anyway, after a discussion with Martin (a very wise man) on this topic, he was keen that I extend my range of vegetables to include both tubers and brassicas and I was with him 100%. As a result I added potato, parsnip, cabbage and radish (IIRC) to my list and the world was good. Seldom had I felt a project more complete than this one.

That was until today when Claire (who doesn't even have a blog so I can't link to her) suggested that I really ought to have "5 a day" and should include fruits in the list. I liked the idea and, as a mark of respect, asked what fruits she thought should be on there. Big mistake. "Banana, of course. And melon. In fact anything that makes a good smoothie." Hardly a great connection I'm sure you'll agree. There were Martin and I working along the lines of species and genus and Claire comes up with "Anything that makes a good smoothie". So I'm afraid I had to veto the idea and I'm back on a diet of pure vegetables.

Still, it makes me smile every time I send one...