About: This is the fourth in a series of blog posts about JavaOne 2006, live from San Francisco. This post contains highlights of some of the technical sessions, the Java Pavilion area and the Microsoft booth. I will post pictures in the upcoming posts

 

Hello,

 

Day 1 at JavaOne has finally ended, I attended some technical sessions, went around the Java Pavilion and answered about ten questions asked hundreds of times by the people visiting the Microsoft booth. Like last year, the Microsoft booth was definitely one of the most popular and we had a healthy stream of JavaOne attendees come over to the booth for a variety of reasons ranging from ‘I want the Interoperability Patterns and Practices book you are distributing at JavaOne’ to ‘What are you doing at a Java conference’ to ‘I never though I would see this day’ to ‘Where can I find more information about jobs at Microsoft?’.

 

In terms of the sessions and pavilion, I think the five most common and popular themes were AJAX, AJAX, AJAX, Interoperability and Mobility. The sessions and booths covering these themes were extremely popular. The other very interesting object at the Java Pavilion was ‘Tommy’, an unmanned, autonomous dune buggy. Tommy participated in a DARPA (a defense advanced research organization) challenge for a prize of $2million which was to be given to a car that could navigate a 175 mile course in Mojave Desert. The course is announced just 2 hours before the race and for the last two years no team had been able to win it. Tommy is powered by Java, it made it in the qualifying rounds but crashed in to a wall and was unable to compete in the finals. So what was it doing in the ‘Power of Java’ Pavilion? Well it is the thought that counts… The competition was won by the Stanford racing team that completed the course in under 7 hours, Pentagon is planning to make up to 1/3rd of its vehicles unmanned by 2015, the technology that will power them remains to be decided.

 

In terms of the sessions, ‘Project Tango’ was quiet popular, it is a project where Sun engineers worked with Microsoft’s WinFx team to implement and test real world interoperability (in terms of security, transactions, messaging and others) between Sun’s J EE 5 implementation and the upcoming Windows Communication Foundation. Any session with AJAX in the title was also extremely popular with the longest lines.

 

At the Microsoft booth, we were distributing information, books, white papers and other materials about Java and .NET interoperability. We were also displaying the Windows Presentation Foundation and Vista, Ajax and Atlas and answering questions about why we are here (my standard answer was ‘I am from Microsoft, we come in peace to talk about peaceful co-existence and interoperability between Java and .NET, take me to your leader’). The other most common question that we got was ‘Is Java and .NET interoperability real?’ I was surprised that many people had no idea that numerous small and large companies like JPMorgan and others have implemented interoperability solutions for mission critical applications and have publicly discussed it in press releases and case studies, I will post some links on my blog in future for those who have doubts about the viability of inter-op solutions

The day was long and exhausting but full of action and excitement, I will post more information and pictures shortly. The day ended with a Java attendee sharing the hotel elevator ride asking me ‘why are you attending a Java conference?’ to which I replied ‘I am from Microsoft, we come in peace to talk about interoperability, I will be glad to talk to your leader tomorrow morning, however, I am completely exhausted today so for now asta nuvista, but I will be back!”

 

Best regards,

Mohammad

 

JavaOne Day 0: http://blogs.msdn.com/mohammadakif/archive/2006/05/15/598552.aspx

JavaOne Day 1, Part 1/3: http://blogs.msdn.com/mohammadakif/archive/2006/05/16/599035.aspx

JavaOne Day 1, Part 2/3: http://blogs.msdn.com/mohammadakif/archive/2006/05/16/599140.aspx