The .NET Framework 2.0 introduced a little-known feature called the synchronization context, which is used to bounce a method call between a calling thread and a target thread or threads, in case the method cannot execute on the original calling thread.

By far, the most common use of a synchronization context is with UI updates.

In the November issue of MSDN Magazine, Juval Lowy demonstrates options for extending Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) to use custom synchronization contexts, both programmatically and declaratively.

Don't forget to review the sample code online, and be sure to check out the other WCF development information available in the MSDN Magazine archives and on the .NET Framework Developer Center.