MSDN Magazine today is adding to its Web site the popular Script Junkie tutorial site, which has been helping Web developers work with HTML, CSS and JavaScript since 2009. Previously hosted on MSDN.com, Script Junkie's valuable how-to and tutorial content will now appear in its own section on the MSDN Magazine Web site.

What does the transition mean for you? More than anything, it ensures that developers will continue to enjoy access to timely how-to articles exploring the fast-growing arena of cross-browser Web development. Every month you'll see a steady flow of features from respected and established Script Junkie authors like Tim Kulp, Emily Lewis and Addy Osmani. It also means that Script Junkie will be introduced to the larger community of MSDN Magazine subscribers and site visitors. There are real opportunities to explore exciting new topics and challenges in script-based Web development.

As editor-in-chief of MSDN Magazine, I can say that Script Junkie couldn't have arrived at a better moment. HTML5-based development is taking off, in part due to Microsoft's aggressive support of the emerging standard. Script Junkie readers have been ahead of the curve on HTML5 adoption, but MSDN Magazine subscribers and site visitors show a high level of interest in the technology as well. Month in and month out, HTML5-themed features and columns on our Web site are consistently among the most-visited articles.

Justin Garrett, senior product marketing manager for Internet Explorer, isn't surprised. "It’s never been a better time to write cross-browser code," he says. "There are lots of new opportunities to use Web standards like HTML5 and CSS3 on Web sites and across many platforms."

With the addition of Script Junkie content and authors, MSDN Magazine is suddenly in a much better position to address that interest -- especially as standards savvy products like Internet Explorer (IE) 10 mature.

"I think Script Junkie readers will find that IE10 has the technologies they are looking for, too, in addition to the new touch-friendly and plug-in free features," Garrett adds.

We have been busy for weeks planning the migration of Script Junkie site content over to the MSDN Magazine Web site. And we'll be even busier over the months to come as we publish fresh tutorials and content focused on serious Web development. Click here to visit the new Script Junkie site at MSDN Magazine.

Are there specific topics or issues you'd like to see covered at Script Junkie? Leave a comment below or email me at mmeditor@microsoft.com.