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  • Blog Post: Gone With the Week (Mar 22 – 26, 2010)

    Here we offer our review on .NET development topics published on independent media.   Microsoft Has Released OData SDK and “Dallas” CTP 2 Abel Avram covers the release of Odata SDK, an AtomPub-based protocol facilitating data sharing over the web through REST-like requests sent by a consumer -.NET...
  • Blog Post: Rendering Text On A Path With WPF

    Text is more than just its literal meaning. By treating text characters as graphical objects, the programmer can make text dance and fly on the screen. In the December 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Charles Petzold shows you how to position text characters along a curved line with Windows Presentation...
  • Blog Post: Advanced Basics: The ObservableCollection Class

    Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) adds functionality to the Microsoft .NET Framework so that you actually can reliably keep bound controls synchronized with their data sources. In the December 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Ken Getz demonstrates how to use the ObservableCollection class provided by...
  • Blog Post: Basic Instincts: Dynamic Data Entry With XML Literals

    Wouldn't it be nice to generate all your maintenance screens in your data-driven applications automatically? In the October 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Beth Massi shows you how to create Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) user interfaces at run time using Visual Basic XML Literals and XML namespace...
  • Blog Post: Routed Events and Commands In WPF

    Routed events and routed commands form the basis for communication among the various parts of your user interface in Windows Presentation Foundation—whether individual controls on one big Window class or controls and their supporting code in separate, decoupled parts of your app. In the September 2008...
  • Blog Post: Foundations: Dependency Properties And Notifications

    How can objects establish boundaries and priorities? The WPF answer is a feature known as dependency properties, which provides a structured way for WPF classes to respond to changes that result from data bindings, styles, inheritance, and other sources. In the September 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine ...
  • Blog Post: Building Composite Applications With WPF

    Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Silverlight provide developers with a simple, declarative means of quickly and easily delivering applications with rich user experiences. But as the number of moving parts increases, keeping the project under control becomes exponentially more difficult. In the...
  • Blog Post: Custom Controls for Silverlight 2

    Silverlight 2 features a rich and robust control model that is the basis for the controls included in the platform and for third-party control packages. You can also use this control model to build controls of your own. In the August 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Jeff Prosise describes how to build a...
  • Blog Post: Data Points: The Entity Framework In Layered Architectures

    When you evaluate any new technology, pattern, or strategy, you have to consider how that new piece of the puzzle is going to mesh with your existing application architecture. With the Entity Framework, integration is not a problem. In the July 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , John Papa demonstrated how...
  • Blog Post: State Sharing In A Peer Network With WPF

    Peer applications cover the gamut from simple file sharing to instant messaging (IM) to full-on collaborative applications such as shared white boarding, Voice over IP (VoIP) calling and conferencing, social networking, and much more. In the July 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Kevin Hoffman shows you...
  • Blog Post: Data Binding and WPF

    Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) offers excellent support for managing the display and editing of complex data. In the December 2007 edition of MSDN Magazine , John Papa did a great job of explaining essential WPF data binding concepts . In the July 2008 issue, Josh Smith explores more advanced...
  • Blog Post: Windows With C++: Decoding Windows Vista Icons With WIC

    In the April 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Kenny Kerr introduced the Windows Imaging Component (WIC) , showing you how you can use it to encode and decode different image formats. In the June 2008 issue, Kenny shows you how to extend WIC by writing your own codecs . In particular, you’ll walk through...
  • Blog Post: Foundations: Bitmaps And Pixel Bits

    A combination of the retained-mode graphics system and notification mechanisms such as dependency properties unleash the flexibility and power of Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF, allowing these objects to be targets of data bindings and animations. In the June 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine , Charles...
  • Blog Post: MSDN Magazine Virtual Labs for June!

    With the June 2008 issue of MSDN Magazine we are launching an exciting new feature for our readers: Virtual Labs! In the Virtual Labs, you can get immediate hands-on experience with our sample code while reading along in the associated article. The labs are preconfigured environments with Windows Vista...
  • Blog Post: Windows with C++: Windows Imaging Component Basics

    The Microsoft Windows Imaging Component (WIC) is an extensible framework for encoding, decoding, and manipulating images. WIC supports different image formats using an extensible set of imaging codecs. Each codec supports a different image format and typically provides both an encoder and decoder. In...
  • Blog Post: Foundations: Vector Graphics and the WPF Shape Class

    In Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), graphical objects have been elevated to a status nearly equal to controls, often participating in layout and receiving mouse, keyboard, and stylus input. In addition, these graphical objects are retained by the graphical system so they needn't be redrawn as frequently...
  • Blog Post: Office Business Apps with Visual Studio 2008 and VSTO 3.0

    Visual Studio 2008 includes VSTO 3.0, which lets you begin solution development for both Office 2003 applications and the 2007 Microsoft Office system, such as developing Microsoft Outlook customizations. In the Launch issue of MSDN Magazine , Steve Fox shows you what you can do with a new type of form...
  • Blog Post: Foundations: Templates for Uncommon Controls

    For programmers who enjoy turning common controls into uncommon visual objects, Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) offers an exciting feature known as the template. By creating a new template—most often in XAML without a lick of code—you can completely revise the visual appearance of the control without...
  • Blog Post: Build Office-Based Solutions Using WPF, WCF, And LINQ

    With Visual Studio 2008, you can build a solution that incorporates the native capabilities of an Office client application combined with the sophisticated UI capabilities of Windows Presentation Foundation that's connected to remote data and services via Windows Communication Foundation and uses the...
  • Blog Post: Create Dynamic Maps with Visual Basic 9.0 and WPF

    The Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) data-binding infrastructure is based around the concepts of dependency objects and dependency properties. A dependency object provides support for change notification and the ability to dynamically fetch and retrieve property values. A dependency property is...
  • Blog Post: Data Points: Data Binding in WPF

    Did you know that Windows® Presentation Foundation (WPF) provides powerful data-binding capabilities? With WPF, you can perform data manipulation using Microsoft® .NET Framework code, XAML, or a combination. You can bind to controls, public properties, XML, or objects, making data binding quick...
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