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  • Blog Post: Microsoft open sources WorldWide Telescope

    We are incredibly pleased to announce that the WorldWide Telescope is now open source under the MIT license and has become an independent project as part of the .NET Foundation . WorldWide Telescope began in 2007 as a Microsoft Research project, with early partners including astronomers and educators...
  • Blog Post: Looking skyward: WWT Digital Dome project brings planetariums to Chinese schools

    About 10 months ago, China’s first planetarium driven by the WorldWide Telescope (WWT) was launched at the Shixinlu primary school. Powered by six high-resolution projectors, the 8-meter dome installation has enabled students not only to see and study the stars and the universe in an immersive...
  • Blog Post: WWT brings astronomy to life for children of all ages

    The night sky holds a special fascination for children worldwide. They gaze at the moon and stars shining overhead, and wonder what they are and how they got there. This natural curiosity is dampened, however, for children who live in urban areas, where air and light pollution dim the celestial show...
  • Blog Post: WorldWide Telescope celebrates new release

    For the past five years, WorldWide Telescope (WWT) has served as an enriching resource in schools, museums, planetariums, and homes all over the world, inspiring students and astronomy enthusiasts with its detailed views of the heavens and interactive educational content. In celebration of its fifth...
  • Blog Post: Computer Science Education Week: "touching" on the Hour of Code

    It’s time to revise the traditional “three Rs” of education in the United States. In addition to “reading, ‘riting, and ‘rithmetic,” we need to add computer science. Yeah, I know it doesn’t even contain an “r,” but computer science is just as...
  • Blog Post: Microsoft Research offers tools and more at AGU 2013 Fall Meeting

    Every December I get together with 20,000 like-minded researchers in San Francisco to discuss how to preserve the habitat of Homo sapiens . I concede it’s a self-serving goal, but I’m okay with standing to benefit. Our conversation invariably burrows into subtopics of how the Earth works...
  • Blog Post: Bringing the heavens into the schoolhouse

    In the five years since Microsoft Research initially launched the WorldWide Telescope (WWT), the product’s many features have been put to a variety of uses. Today in Chongqing, China, we saw yet another first for WorldWide Telescope: the unveiling of the first WWT-driven planetarium in China. The...
  • Blog Post: WorldWide Telescope Powers “Cosmic Wonder” at Adler Planetarium

    Microsoft Research’s WorldWide Telescope (WWT) has brought spectacular images and engaging, informative tours of the night sky to countless personal computers—including, we hope, yours. But WorldWide Telescope also offers a powerful tool for planetariums, large and small, providing two things...
  • Blog Post: South by Software—Microsoft’s Excellent Austin Adventure

    Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of attending South by Southwest Interactive , one of the largest conferences on emerging technology in the world. The event is held in Austin, Texas, as part of the family of South by Southwest (SXSW) festivals that also include events showcasing music, film, and...
  • Blog Post: Seeing Your World Through a Different Light

    As the saying goes: everything is bigger in Texas. And coming this weekend, March 8 to 10, there will be a couple of Texas-sized telescopes at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival in Austin. Housed in the mammoth NASA Experience Tent, a wall-sized display will show off Microsoft Research’s...
  • Blog Post: Creating Buzz for Computer Science

    Here’s a sobering fact: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that by 2018 there will be 1.4 million open technology jobs in the United States and, at the current rate of students graduating with degrees in computer science, we will fill only 61 percent of those openings. These predictions...
  • Blog Post: Narwhal Helps Developers Visualize Data in WorldWide Telescope

    First to explain… no, there is no time. Let me sum up: you are a scientist with complex geospatial data visualization challenges. We at Microsoft Research have a solution for you and we’re enhancing this through the release of a software library called Narwhal . (We threw in some example...
  • Blog Post: Big Data Blows into the Windy City

    This week, the annual Microsoft eScience Workshop is being held in Chicago (the “Windy City”), providing an unparalleled opportunity for domain scientists, researchers, and technologists to discuss the benefits and difficulties of incorporating more computing and information technology into...
  • Blog Post: Users Attract New Users to WorldWide Telescope

    I’ve done numerous public presentations of WorldWide Telescope (WWT) since 2008, but last month’s demos at the International Astronomical Union’s 2012 General Assembly (IAU2012) in Beijing were by far the most satisfying. Why? Because they were conducted primarily by student volunteers...
  • Blog Post: Get a Jump on Space Day

    Looking for a fun, educational, and inexpensive way to observe Space Day? The Museum of Flight in Seattle is throwing an early-bird celebration the evening before, and the Microsoft WorldWide Telescope team will be celebrating with them. On Thursday, May 3, the museum is offering free admission from...
  • Blog Post: Open Data for Open Science—an Eye-Opening Event

    Punctuating the gray skies and rain that typify spring in the Pacific Northwest, the first week of April brought a sunny gathering of data scientists and engineers from multiple disciplines to Microsoft’s Redmond campus, where the second annual Open Data for Open Science workshop, or ODOS2012 ...
  • Blog Post: WorldWide Telescope Takes Center Stage in Moscow

    On February 9, 2012, Russian astronomers of all levels—professional, amateur, student, and teacher—congregated at Moscow’s Sternberg Astronomical Institute for WorldWide Telescope Day. Russia’s foremost astronomy institution, the Sternberg Astronomical Institute , also known as...
  • Blog Post: Data Visualization Reaches New Heights with Layerscape

    In December, I blogged about the beta release of Layerscape , a free set of research tools from Microsoft that enable earth scientists to visualize and tell stories around large, complex data sets. The full release is now available to the public at Layerscape . We’re calling Layerscape an “ecosystem”...
  • Blog Post: Managing the Scientific Data Explosion: a Response to the OSTP Digital Data RFI

    Scientists can agree that there’s a lot of data out there, and that we could be using it more efficiently. Now the White House has asked for input on how to do just that. Data from scientific research is important to a diverse array of user communities from researchers, governments, and companies...
  • Blog Post: Readers’ Choice: Top 10 Blogs of 2011

    Recaps of the top 10 news stories of the year—it’s a New Year’s tradition that rivals Dick Clark’s “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” show. So who are we to buck convention? Therefore, without further ado, here are the top 10 Microsoft Research Connections blogs...
  • Blog Post: No CS Student Left Behind

    Computer Science Education Week ( CSEdWeek ), which took place this year from December 4 to 10 in the United States, is a celebration of computer science education. And while it’s a great idea to devote a week to recognizing the importance of this field, it’s a topic that demands year-round...
  • Blog Post: Night at the Museum—sans Ben Stiller

    Jonathan Fay and I recently visited the California Academy of Sciences , the world-class natural history museum and research center located in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Our goals were to connect in person with Academy researchers and to help prepare the Academy’s Morrison Planetarium...
  • Blog Post: Kinect for Windows SDK Beta Makes It Big in the Big Apple

    The Kinect for Windows SDK beta was honored as one of the “ 10 Most Innovative Tech Products of 2011 ” earlier this week at the 2011 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Awards ceremony held at the Hearst Tower in New York City. Gavin Jancke, general manager of Engineering for Microsoft Research...
  • Blog Post: Open Data for Open Science: The Rise of X-Informatics

    Astronomy is rapidly becoming exponentially data rich, with data management, data exploration, and knowledge discovering becoming central to the research enterprise. This has brought about great opportunity for growth and discovery in both astronomy and computational science. It has also created many...
  • Blog Post: Happy Birthday, Microsoft Research…Now Blow out the Candles and Back to the Lab

    Twenty years; two decades; a fifth of a century—we can phrase it several ways, but what does it mean? To a person, it’s the onset of adulthood (or maybe the point marking only 10 more years of living in Mom and Dad’s basement); to a dog, it’s senescence. But to us at Microsoft...
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