January, 2012

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    New Report Design Guidelines

    • 1 Comments

    [This post has been updated for accuracy since the first publication.]

    For NAV RDLC reports, we have drafted Report Design Guidelines.

    I see report developers as artists because they start with a blank piece of paper, just like an artist. As artists, only your imagination stops you from what you draw and add to this piece of paper. If you have worked with our new RDLC reports in NAV 2009 you have probably realized the many possibilities and options in Visual Studio. So not to limit the creativity of report developers but to help you, we have decided to leverage new Report Design Guidelines for many of our reports in the standard application in our next version. The intention with these guidelines is not to create extra work for the report developers but actually to help. Also this gives consistency so that when designing several reports, it is very easy for report developers to know how the reports should look and you do not need to spend time inventing a new look and feel for each report. In essence, the Report Design Guidelines should save you time when designing reports.

    Although the Report Design Guidelines are not final and published yet, there is nothing stopping you from leveraging the new guidelines for your RDLC reports in NAV 2009.

    Attached you will find the draft of the Report Design Guidelines.

    At the moment, the draft of the Report Design Guidelines comprises a checklist, which you can go through one by one. For example, it is a good practice to define the Page Width, Page Height, and margins in the Report Properties before starting to design your report. Please note that all checks do not necessarily apply to all report types and that the guidelines are currently in a draft state. We would very much like to hear your feedback about the guidelines!

    To help you understand how to use the new Report Design Guidelines in NAV 2009 we have done several “How to videos”. You can find the videos here at YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5C8332C783CEA7A0

    In the new Report Design Guidelines you will also find several examples on how reports will look when the guidelines have been followed. Also I have applied the new Report Design Guidelines to couple of attached standard reports. Please find these in attached zip file.

    Thanks,
    Claus Lundstrøm

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    QR Codes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV

    • 19 Comments

    QR codes (abbreviated from Quick Response code) are appearing in many different places today, and they are found to be quick and efficient when it comes to working with mobile phones and other devices which can read them. QR Code is a multipurpose instrument and it can hold all sorts of different types of valuable information like your company’s or your salesperson’s contact details, sales invoice information, promotional codes, location information, checksums, amounts, web links etc., which you can read using a QR code reader to automate some of the routine manual processes, like typing in things manually. 

    The QR code is a two-dimensional data-matrix which can be decoded very fast. The format is clearly defined and published as an ISO standard.

    QR code

    As the Windows Phone 7.5 update, code name “Mango”, rolls out to customers, it makes it even more relevant to use the QR codes, as you can now use your Windows phone camera to scan QR codes by bringing them into camera view. Bing will recognize QR codes and will help you save and use the information encoded in it.

    In some countries, popularity of QR codes has grown so much, that their usage is now considered a national standard. Our team has recently released an update for the Mexican market, where we added QR codes to several major Microsoft Dynamics NAV documents. And we thought – why don’t we let everyone else enjoy this new cool feature?

    The update is available for NAV 5.0 SP1, NAV 2009 SP1 and NAV 2009 R2 versions of the product.

    URLs for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 SP1 and R2:

    https://mbs.microsoft.com/customersource/downloads/taxupdates/MSDNAV2009SP1ElectronicInvoice_Mexico   

    URLs for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 5.0 SP1 :

    https://mbs.microsoft.com/customersource/downloads/taxupdates/MSDNAV5SP1ElectronicInvoice_Mexico

    However, the only part you need from it is the MXElectronicInvoice.msi file included in the package. Note that the .msi file is exactly the same for both versions of NAV.

    Here is what you have to do to get your data encoded into a QR code:

    1. Run the installer to deploy the dll we shipped for this update. Among other things, the dll includes QRCodeProvider  and IBarCodeProvider classes which we can use.

    2. Add a BLOB field which will be storing the QR Code image into the Sales Invoice Header table for example:

    3. Remember to set the SubType property to Bitmap if you would like to use the QR code on pages:

    4. You can now use the following code to generate a QR code image, which for demo purposes will be saved into a first found posted sales invoice (needless to say, you should be doing it on a test database ;) ) In this example we will encode a contact card with some predefined details.

    OBJECT Codeunit 50001 QR Code Mgt.
    {
      OBJECT-PROPERTIES
      {
        Date=;
        Time=;
        Modified=Yes;
        Version List=QR Code;
      }
      PROPERTIES
      {
        OnRun=VAR
                CompanyInfo@1170000004 : Record 2000000006;
                SalesInvoiceHeader@1170000003 : Record 112;
                TempBlob@1170000002 : Record 99008535;
                QRCodeInput@1170000000 : Text[1024];
                QRCodeFileName@1170000001 : Text[1024];
              BEGIN
                // Save a QR code image into a file in a temporary folder
                QRCodeInput := CreateQRCodeInput('John,Doe','+555 1231231','john@doe.zzz','www.johndoe.zzz');
                QRCodeFileName := GetQRCode(QRCodeInput);
                QRCodeFileName := MoveToMagicPath(QRCodeFileName); // To avoid confirmation dialogue on RTC

               // Load the image from file into the BLOB field
                CLEAR(TempBlob);
                ThreeTierMgt.BLOBImport(TempBlob,QRCodeFileName,FALSE);
                IF SalesInvoiceHeader.FINDFIRST THEN BEGIN
                  SalesInvoiceHeader."QR Code" := TempBlob.Blob;
                  SalesInvoiceHeader.MODIFY;
                END;

               // Erase the temporary file
                IF NOT ISSERVICETIER THEN
                  IF EXISTS(QRCodeFileName) THEN
                    ERASE(QRCodeFileName);

                MESSAGE('Done!');
              END;
      }
      CODE
      {
        VAR
          ThreeTierMgt@1170000001 : Codeunit 419;

        LOCAL PROCEDURE CreateQRCodeInput@1020046(Name@1020000 : Text[80];PhoneNo@1020002 : Text[80];EMail@1020003 : Text[80];URL@1170000000 : Text[80]) QRCodeInput : Text[1024];
        BEGIN
          QRCodeInput :=
            'MECARD:' +
            'N:' + Name + ';' +
            'TEL:' + PhoneNo + ';' +
            'EMAIL:' + EMail + ';' +
            'URL:' + URL + ';';
        END;

        LOCAL PROCEDURE GetQRCode@1020038(QRCodeInput@1020001 : Text[1024]) QRCodeFileName : Text[1024];
        VAR
          IBarCodeProvider@1020000 : Automation "{89F54BC4-E6C9-44BA-8574-86568625BFF8} 1.0:{9FE38730-1A3C-4B84-A8C2-AFAC6A90E641}:'Microsoft Dynamics Nav MX Services'.IBarCodeProvider";
        BEGIN
          GetBarCodeProvider(IBarCodeProvider);
          QRCodeFileName := IBarCodeProvider.GetBarCode(QRCodeInput);
        END;

        PROCEDURE GetBarCodeProvider@1020001(VAR IBarCodeProvider@1020000 : Automation "{89F54BC4-E6C9-44BA-8574-86568625BFF8} 1.0:{9FE38730-1A3C-4B84-A8C2-AFAC6A90E641}:'Microsoft Dynamics Nav MX Services'.IBarCodeProvider");
        VAR
          QRCodeProvider@1020002 : Automation "{89F54BC4-E6C9-44BA-8574-86568625BFF8} 1.0:{69FEA5E6-0A76-4555-B74B-F170956B0098}:'Microsoft Dynamics Nav MX Services'.QRCodeProvider";
        BEGIN
          IF ISCLEAR(QRCodeProvider) THEN
            CREATE(QRCodeProvider,TRUE,TRUE);
          IBarCodeProvider := QRCodeProvider;
        END;

        PROCEDURE MoveToMagicPath@1170000000(SourceFileName@1170000000 : Text[1024]) DestinationFileName : Text[1024];
        VAR
          FileSystemObject@1170000001 : Automation "{F935DC20-1CF0-11D0-ADB9-00C04FD58A0B} 1.0:{0D43FE01-F093-11CF-8940-00A0C9054228}:'Windows Script Host Object Model'.FileSystemObject";
        BEGIN
          DestinationFileName := ThreeTierMgt.ClientTempFileName('','');
          IF ISCLEAR(FileSystemObject) THEN
            CREATE(FileSystemObject,TRUE,TRUE);
          FileSystemObject.MoveFile(SourceFileName,DestinationFileName);
        END;

        BEGIN
        END.
      }
    }

    5. With the image saved in the BLOB field, it is now “business as usual” to add it to a report. You can see, for example, how company logo is added to the standard NAV document reports. NB. Don’t forget to run CALCFIELDS on the "QR Code" field before you display its content. :-)

    6. And finally – run the report to see the QR code which you or your customers can scan, for example, with your favorite  Windows 7.5 mobile phone:

     

    These postings are provided "AS IS" with no warranties and confer no rights. You assume all risk for your use.

     

    Best regards,

    Microsoft Dynamics NAV ERM Team

    Dmitry Chadayev, Program Manager

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Simulation of Average Cost Calculation

    • 0 Comments

    When using Average Costing method it’s sometimes difficult to interpret the assigned costs of an outbound entry. 

    In the scenario below there is process description for simulating the average cost calculation. This is often used when investigating costing issues related to the average costing method. It has been helpful in verifying the recognized COGS, to describe the average cost calculation or using it as identification that somewhere in time the average cost is unexpected. It helps to identify the area for deeper research of the records demonstrating unexpected values.

    This blog post describes the process for how the average cost calculation can be simulated only and does not describe possible causes or possible correction processes.

    The following scenario is carried out to create the basic data set. The data set is then used as base for processing and analyzing the average cost calculation when having the setup Average Cost Period as Day and Month respectively.

    The scenario is carried out in a W1 Cronus database.

    The first two steps create the basic data set which later on is used in respective simulation of average cost calculation.

    1. Create Item: TEST

    Average Costing method

    Unit Cost: 10

    2. Create and post the following documents.

     

    If you are aiming for creating the full scenario and working through the respective simulations of Average cost calculation for Day and Month, it’s a good thing to create a backup now.

    Inventory setup, Average Cost Calc Period = Day

    3. Run the Adjust Cost - Item Entries batch job.

    4. Filter the Item Ledger Entry table on Item TEST and review the fields specified below.

    5. Open Revaluation Journal

    6. Run Function Calculate Inventory Value:

    Filter Item: TEST

    Posting Date: September 15, 2011

    Per Item

    7. Change Unit Cost (Revalued) to 12 as above.

    8. Post Line.

    9. Run Adjust Cost - Item Entries batch job.

    10. Filtering the Value Entries table on Item TEST, the following records are available:

    Simulation of Average Cost Calculation with Average Cost period = Day

    Now we are moving into the process of simulating the Average cost Calculation when Average cost period is Day, using the data for item TEST created in the scenario above.

    When you have identified the Item that you need to further analyze the following process can be used. Below the described process, there is a screenshot showing the results of the simulation of the Average Cost calculation of item TEST.
    In addition there is an Excel sheet attached where the full data set is available where used formulas, etc. can be reviewed more closely.

    1. In the Value Entries table, filter on the particular Item that is to be analyzed.   
    If Average Cost Calc. Type is per Item&Location&Variant the filter has to cover also these fields with particular values in scope for the analysis.

    2. Paster filtered Value entries into Excel.

    3. Do a Custom Sorting using the fields as below:

    Comments to respective field being a part of the sorting:

    Valuation Date: is the date for when the entry shall be part of the Average cost calculation.

    Partial Revaluation: a field that states Yes on Value entries with Type Revaluation. Revaluations affect the valuation of the following period’s outbound entries, not the outbound entries of the same period.

    Valued quantity: is populated on every Value entry, corresponds to Item ledger entry quantity, Invoiced Quantity or Revalued quantity. Largest to smallest brings the inbound entries to come before the outbound entries of the period and thereby create the base for calculating the average cost of the period.

    Item Ledger entry No.: Is to group the value entries attached to same Item ledger entry no.

    4. Insert Summary lines where you want to establish the periods Average Cost (grey lines below). A summary line shall be inserted above the first outbound entry of a period. To identify the breakpoint for inserting the summary line follow these steps:

    a. Establish the Valuation Date to be in scope for the investigation and locate these entries in the sorted Value entry list.

    b. Then follow the stated quantities in field Valued Quantity for the chosen Valuation date. Identify the first line with negative quantity and you have the first outbound entry of the period.

    c. Insert a line for calculation, above the first outbound entry of the period (example in the screenshot below and in attached spreadsheet; column M row 3 and 5, row 3 positive Valued Quantity, row 5 negative Valued Quantity, Summary line is inserted, row 4.

    5. Make a Sum of the columns; Cost Amount (Actual), Cost Amount (Expected) and Item Ledger Entry Quantity. Calculate the Average Unit Cost of the period (column R) with the following formula:

    If you have several Summary lines inserted, make sure to include the previous summary line into the calculation of respective column for the next period.

    6. Choose an outbound entry, usually the first outbound entry of the period and then a couple of others, randomly selected in the period or those that for some reasons is of particular interest, and calculate the average cost per unit with the formula above (green, purple and blue sections in screenshot below).

    - Does it correspond to the average unit cost of the period?

    If not, ensure it is not fixed applied to an inbound entry: If field Valued By Average Cost is False, it is fixed applied to an inbound entry.
    To which entry?; Follow up on the parent Item Ledger entry, field Applies-to Entry shall carry the entry no. of the supplying Item Ledger Entry.
    If not fixed applied; establish the Amount Rounding precision and investigate if that has an effect on the Calculated Average cost.

    These are the Value entries for item TEST when they have been sorted as described in step 3, where Summary lines has been inserted to establish Average cost for a certain period (step 4, 5) and where the  first outbound entry of the period is calculated (step 6).

    In attached spreadsheet used formulas can be checked by clicking in respective field.

    Inventory setup, Average Cost Calc Period = Month

    Another Average Cost Calc Period to use is Month, so let’s work with the basic scenario, create some additional data and see the effects having Month as Average Cost Calc Period and finally look into the simulation of the Average Cost calculation and its specifics.

    The scenario continues using the basic data set created until step 2. If you did a backup after step 2 and have been working with the Average Cost Calc Period of Day you now have the opportunity to restore the backup and you will be able to start with step 3 below. 

    3. Change Inventory setup; Average Cost Calc Period to Month.

    4. Run Adjust Cost - Item entries batch job.

    5. Filter the Item Ledger Entry table, Item TEST, and review the fields specified below.

    6. Open Revaluation Journal

    7. Run Function Calculate Inventory Value:

    Filter Item: TEST

    Posting Date: September 30, 2011

    Per Item

    8. Change Unit Cost (Revalued) to 12 as above.

    9. Post Line.

    10. Run Adjust Cost - Item Entries batch job.

    11. Filtering the Value Entries table, Item TEST, the following records are available:

    Simulation of Average Cost Calculation with Average Cost period = Month

    Now we are moving into the process of simulating the Average cost Calculation when Average Cost period is Month, using the data for item TEST created in the scenario.

    When you have identified the Item that you need to further analyze the following process can be used. Below the described process, there is a screenshot showing the result of the simulation of the Average Cost calculation of item TEST using the Value entries created in the scenario. In addition there is an Excel sheet attached where the full data set is available where used formulas etc can be reviewed more closely.

    1. In the Value Entries table filter on the particular Item that is to be analyzed.              
    If Average Cost Calc. Type is per Item&Location&Variant the filter has to cover also these fields with particular values in scope for the analysis.

    2. Paste filtered Value entries into Excel.

    3. Conversion of Valuation Date into Period:  
    Having another Average Cost Calc Period than Day requires the Valuation date to be translated into the chosen Average Cost Calc Period. In this case it’s Month.
    In the screenshot below and in the attached Excel sheet the mentioned columns can be found.

    a. Column F is added: The Valuation Date column is copied into column F. Thereafter column F is selected and the Format is changed to Number, no decimals. The Valuation Date is now converted to a number in column F.

    b. Column G is added and is intended to carry the Year of the Valuation Date:
    Select column G and change Format to Number, no decimals.
    Add formula: =YEAR(F2) in cell G2, then double click on the plus sign in the right corner of the cell and the Year is generated for the rest of the lines.

    c. Column H is added and is intended to carry the Period No. of the Valuation Date:
    Select column H and change Format to Number, no decimals.
    Add formula: =MONTH(F2) in cell H2, then double click on the plus in the right corner of the cell and the Month is generated for the rest of the lines.

    4. Do a Custom Sorting using the fields as below:

    Comments to respective field being a part of the sorting:

    Year and Period No.: is the time for when the entry shall be part of the Average cost calculation.

    Partial Revaluation: a field that states Yes on Value entries with Type Revaluation. Revaluations affect the valuation of the following period’s outbound entries, not the outbound entries of the same period

    Valued quantity: is populated on every Value entry, corresponds to Item ledger entry quantity, Invoiced Quantity or Revalued quantity. Largest to smallest brings the inbound entries to come before the outbound entries of the period and thereby create the base for calculating the average cost of the period.

    Item Ledger entry No.: Is to group the value entries attached to same Item ledger entry no.

    5. Insert Summary lines where you want to establish the periods Average Cost (grey lines below). A summary line shall be inserted above the first outbound entry of a period. To identify the breakpoint for inserting the summary line follow these steps:

    a. Establish the time period to be in scope for the investigation and locate these entries in the sorted Value entry list.  

    b. Then follow the stated quantities in field Valued Quantity for the chosen time period.
    Identify the first line with negative quantity and you have the first outbound entry of the period.

    c. Insert a line for calculations. (Column P, row 4 and 6, row 4 positive Valued Quantity, row 6 negative Valued Quantity, Summary line is inserted as row 4).

    6. Make a Sum of the columns; Cost Amount (Actual), Cost Amount (Expected) and Item Ledger Entry Quantity. Calculate the Average Unit Cost of the period (column U) with the following formula:

    If you have several Summary lines inserted, make sure to include the previous summary line into the calculation of respective column for the next period.

    7. Choose an outbound entry, usually the first outbound entry of the period and then a couple of others, randomly selected in the period or those that for some reasons is of particular interest, and calculate the average cost per unit with the formula above (green, purple and blue sections in screenshot below).

    - Does it correspond to the average unit cost of the period?

    If not, ensure it is not fixed applied to an inbound entry: If field Valued By Average Cost is False, it is fixed applied to an inbound entry.
    To which entry?; Follow up on the parent Item Ledger entry, field Applies-to Entry shall carry the entry no. of the supplying Item Ledger Entry.
    If not fixed applied; establish the Amount Rounding precision and if that has an effect on the Calculated Average cost.

    These are the Value entries for item TEST when they have been sorted as described in step 4, where Summary lines has been inserted to establish Average cost for a certain period (step 5,6) and where the  first outbound entry of the period (+ the 2nd in period 10) is calculated (step 7).

    Note that all inbound entries in September (Period No. 9) is sorted at the top and demonstrate the effect on all outbound entries in September regardless of the specific valuation date.

    To follow the process and be able to review used formulas etc., an Excel sheet is attached and contains the following tabs:

    Basic Data

    ---------------

    Contains the scenario and what data it creates. Thereafter the basic scenario moves into two paths, one for using Day as Average Cost period and the other for using Month as Average Cost Period. The respective set of Value entries are thereafter pasted into the next tabs.

     

    Average Cost simulation - Day

    ----------------------------------------

    At the top the Value entries are pasted from the Basic Data scenario addressing the Average cost period of Day.

    The Value entries are processed; sorted and calculated as described beneath the section of value entries.

     

    Average Cost simulation - Month

    -------------------------------------------

    At the top the Value entries are pasted from the Basic Data scenario addressing the Average cost period of Month.

    The Value entries are processed; sorted and calculated as described beneath the section of value entries.

     

    Any feedback to how this process and documentation can be further developed to provide more insight in the average cost calculation is very welcome.

     

    Helene Holmin

    Escalation Engineer NAV Costing EMEA

    hholmin@microsoft.com

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Costing Error Detection and Data Correction White Paper for Microsoft Dynamics NAV

    • 4 Comments

    A new Costing Error and Data Correction white paper and a Costing Error Detection report have been released on PartnerSource and CustomerSource.

    The Costing Error Detection and Data Correction white paper discusses common inventory costing issues and how you can correct erroneous data after inventory costing issues have been identified. The white paper focuses on the data and the fields that typically cause problems in the cost adjustment process.

    The Costing Error Detection report can help you find common costing data problems. If the report shows that there are errors in your database, you can use the suggestions in the white paper to correct the data. The report can also be used to validate inventory data after an upgrade.

    To review the white paper and download the report, go to:

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Jet Reports Express for Microsoft Dynamics NAV Now Available for Swedish and Norwegian Languages

    • 0 Comments

    As of December 28, 2011, Jet Reports Express for Microsoft Dynamics NAV has been updated to include Swedish and Norwegian languages. This easy to use and very popular Microsoft Excel add-in for ad-hoc reporting is available as a download on Customer Source and Partner Source for no additional costs for customers on an active Business Ready Enhancement Plan. 

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Post – Apply – From Item Entry Application Across Locations

    • 0 Comments

    The following blog post is to provide guidance for users of the Inventory costing functionality within Microsoft Dynamics NAV. The specific article is designed for providing guidance that you are able to use Appl. – from Item Entry to create an Item Entry Application across locations. This feature is not permitted using the Appl. – To Item Entry when you try to make an Quantity Item Entry Application across Locations.

    Appl. – from Item Entry is intended when you want to make an Item Fixed Cost Application overwriting the default Costing Method. It means that the inventory increase, for example a sales credit memo line is linked to the inventory decrease in the item ledger entry that you indicate in this field.

    Initial scenario to illustrate

    This scenario is carried out in W1 Cronus.

    1. Create new item 70061, Unit of Measure PCS, any posting groups and select costing method FIFO.

    2. Create Purchase Order against vendor 60000, Item 70061 Location BLUE, Quantity 1, Direct Unit Cost Excl. VAT 10. Specify vendor invoice number and posted as Received + Invoiced.

    3. Sell item 70061 using Sales Order against customer 60000, Location BLUE, Quantity 1. Post as Shipped + Invoiced.

    4. Create Sales Credit Memo against customer 60000, using Get Posted Document Lines to Reverse to retrieve the Posted Sales Order processed at step 3.

    Notice: Appl. – From Item Entry is populated.

     5. Change location from default BLUE to RED.

    Notice: Appl. – From Item Entry has not been changed.

     Notice: Return Reason Code field on the Sales Credit Memo line will enable to set a Default Location Code.

    6. Post the Sales Credit Memo as Invoiced.

    7. Purchase Order for Item Charge Freight against vendor 61000, Location BLUE, Quantity 1, Direct Unit cost Excl. VAT 2.50.

    8. Assign the Item Charge against the Purchase Order that been processed at step 2. Specify vendor invoice number and posted as Invoiced.

    9. Run Adjust Cost Item Entries batch job. Lookup Item Ledger Entries and notice 2.50 been forwarded from Sales Order to the Sales Credit Memo we processed at step 4.

    By applying a positive entry in this case Sales Credit Memo to a negative through Appl. -From Item Entry, we make a cost application between them and hence turn this positive into a “Return / Correction”, that has to receive its cost from the applied outbound. Since the positive entry is now effectively a “return”, the entry application is allowed across locations. This is essentially a feature of the Returns Order Management that was introduced since 3.01. In recognition of the fact that
    customers may want to return products to a location different from the one where they originally sold.

    Additional scenario 

    1. Create new item 70062, Unit of Measure PCS, any posting groups and select costing method FIFO.

    2. Open Item Journal, Entry type Negative Adjustment, item 70062, Location BLUE, Unit Cost 10, Quantity 1. Post.

    3. Open Item Journal, Entry type Positive Adjustment, item 70062, Location RED, specify Appl.-From Item Entry against Negative Adjustment.

    Notice: When you drill down into Appl. – From Entry, there are no Item Ledger Entries. You need to remove the (location) filter and then you can select the Negative Adjustment.

    Notice: Lookup item ledger entries of item 70062 and both item ledger entries are left open. This is intended design.

    4. Post the Positive Adjustment created at step 3.

    5. Open Item Journal, Entry type Positive Adjustment, item 70062, Location BLUE, Unit Cost 13, Quantity 1, Post.

    6. Run Adjust Cost Item Entries batch job.

    Notice: Outbound (step 2) and Inbound (step 4) are now closed on the Item ledger entries.

    7. Adjustment of LCY 3 is now forwarded according to the chain: Positive Adjmt., step 5 -> Negative Adjmt., step 2 -> Positive Adjmt., step 3.

    So, the Item Entry Application is possible between locations when and only when we have a Cost Application between the outbound and inbound entries.

    The same logic cannot be applied to Transfer Orders as they generate a quantity application between entries. One reason you cannot create Transfer Order when you do not have the Quantity on Hand.

     

    -Christiaan Osborne

    Product Support Escalation Engineer

    APGC Customer Support & Services  SMS&P

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