Microsoft Dynamics NAV

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  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Writing a welcome mail to users of Microsoft Dynamics NAV for tablets

    • 4 Comments

    To use Microsoft Dynamics NAV on their tablet, users must first install and then later connect the app to a Microsoft Dynamics NAV installation. Discovering that the app is available in an app store, however, and getting started with the app can be hard.

    So to help them get started, we will create an email to send to users of Microsoft Dynamics NAV with instructions on how to install the right app, on the right device, and how to connect to the right server, tenant, and company. All of it in a simple format so everyone can succeed. 

    Prerequisites

    First, we need to gather some information from the current Microsoft Dynamics NAV installation. In this setup, there are three web server instances in three different languages. 

    What to collect

    Collected value

    Notes

    Web server host name

    mynavwebserver.mycompany.com

    The server is configured with https.

    Web server instance name, Danish

    da

    Language = da

    Web server instance name, German

    de

    Language = de

    Web server instance name, English

    en

    Language = en

    Tenant name

    default

    This is not a multi-tenant setup.

    Company name

    My company

     

    Construct the template

    Let's start by creating the template for the email. Open your favorite HTML mail editor and create a new email with the following content:

    Subject: Getting started with Microsoft Dynamics NAV on your tablet.
    Body:
    Dear Microsoft Dynamics NAV User,

    To use Microsoft Dynamics NAV, open this email on your tablet and perform the following three easy steps:

    1. Install the Dynamics NAV app: 

        

    Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.
    Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

    Please note that due to technical limitations, this blog post cannot apply hyperlinks to the graphics for the three stores. In your email, we recommend that you make the graphics clickable to give your customers an easy way to get to the app. You can see the links to each store in an earlier blog post.   

    2. Open the app in your language:

    Åbn på dansk

    Auf Deutsch öffnen

    Open in English

    3. Enter your username and password.

    You are now ready to use Microsoft Dynamics NAV on your device.

    Best regards,
    [your signature]

    Links to install the app

    Each of the store icons has to link to the right app in each store. Do this by finding the app in each store and copying the link to the store icon in the mail.

    Windows Store

    The Windows Store can be accessed from your browser by visiting http://apps.microsoft.com/windows.
    From here you can search for the app. The link to copy is the address of the app details page.

    Example, OneNote app: http://apps.microsoft.com/windows/en-us/app/f022389f-f3a6-417e-ad23-704fbdf57117.

    App Store

    The iOS App Store can be accessed from your browser by visiting https://itunes.apple.com.
    From here you can search for the app. The link to copy is the address of the app details page.

    Example, Microsoft Office Mobile for iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/microsoft-office-mobile/id541164041.

    Google Play

    The Google Play store can be accessed from your browser by visiting https://play.google.com/store.
    From here you can search for the app. The link to copy is the address of the app details page.

    Example, Microsoft Office Mobile for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.microsoft.office.officehub.

    Links to open the app

    The Microsoft Dynamics NAV app registers the protocol scheme ms-dynamicsnav on your device and this can be used to activate the app on the device.

    Each of the links to open the app can be constructed as follows: ms-dynamicsnav://<Server>[:<Port>]/<Instance>[?company=<Company>&tenant=<Tenant>]

    Replace each part with the relevant value collected earlier for each Microsoft Dynamics NAV Web server instance. The port, company, and tenant parameters are optional; if not provided, as we do here in this example, the default port (443), company, and tenant for that instance will be selected.

    This means that our document contains the following links:

    Åbn på dansk
    ms-dynamicsnav://mynavwebserver.mycompany.com/da?Company=My%20Company

    Auf Deutsch öffnen
    ms-dynamicsnav://mynavwebserver.mycompany.com/de?Company=My%20Company

    Open in English
    ms-dynamicsnav://mynavwebserver.mycompany.com/en?Company=My%20Company

    Note that some email clients, especially browser-based clients, will disable or block URLs which do not use well-known protocols. If you are unsure which email client your users typically use to read mail, you should consider adding a note to the welcome mail so that users are instructed to activate the app and can then easily copy the service URL from the mail and paste it into the app to get connected. For example, for the English web server instance, you would provide the link https://mynavwebserver.mycompany.com/en

    Finish the email

    We started by creating the template for the email. Open your favorite HTML mail editor and edit the mail so that it looks like this:

    Subject: Get started with Microsoft Dynamics NAV on your device.
    Body:
    Dear Microsoft Dynamics NAV User,

    To use Microsoft Dynamics NAV, open this email on your tablet and perform the following three easy steps:

    1. Install the Microsoft Dynamics NAV app: 

        

    Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.
    Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

    2. Open the app in your language:

    Åbn på dansk.

    Auf Deutsch öffnen.

    Open in English.

    3. Enter your username and password.

    You are now ready to use Microsoft Dynamics NAV on your device.

    Best regards,
    [your signature]

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Announcing Microsoft Dynamics NAV for Tablets

    • 8 Comments

    You can now experience the power and simplicity of Dynamics NAV on your tablet, whether you own an iPad, Android or Windows device!

    For Customers

    Download and install the Dynamics NAV app from the Windows Store, App Store or Google Play. You sign in using your usual credentials and the app connects to your Dynamics NAV 2015 server, on premise or in the cloud.

    Navigate your business data using a fast and fluid interface which leverages design concepts from modern Windows and Office 365, whilst remaining distinctly Dynamics NAV. Do more on the go with capabilities such as send to Excel or Office 365, up-to-date charts and KPIs, emailing of sales quotes and invoices, and shoot and attach pictures with your camera.

    Your executives, sales field, service technicians, warehouse workers and many more can now get access to the data they need from the device they prefer. Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 comes ready for small businesses with the Small Business for Tablets role. For midsized businesses seeking custom solutions for various roles, talk to your Partner.

    For Partners

    Almost all content within the app consists of application pages coming from your Dynamics NAV 2015 server, and they are rendered using our new Tablet client, designed exclusively for touch. 

    This makes development for tablets similar to development for any other Microsoft Dynamics NAV client! Create new pages or customize existing pages in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Development Environment on your workstation, and it is ready for iOS, Android, and Windows. Test your role-tailored solution directly on your workstation using the Tablet client running in the browser. You don’t even need to go out and purchase a bunch of tablets of different sizes, versions and platforms. 

    Since the Tablet client is based on Web client technology, you get to reuse your investments in application objects, business logic, and modern client add-ins, and you administer, license, secure, and maintain it in precisely the same way.

    Learn More

    Get the app today

     

    Download on the App Store
    Download from Windows Store
      Get in on Google Play

    Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.
    Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

    Best regards,
    The Dynamics NAV team

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    NEW document reporting tool for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

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    Microsoft Dynamics NAV has a great business insight story – Dynamics NAV 2015 makes it even better!

    With Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 endusers can now customize and create their own document reports in familiar Microsoft Word.

    Building on this capability, Microsoft has announced the upcoming availability of the Microsoft Word reporting add-in – Jet Reports Express for Microsoft Word for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015.

    Through a simple and intuitive interface in Microsoft Word endusers can easily change the Microsoft Dynamics NAV dataset in a Microsoft Word document report template to allow endusers to create their own design and save the template into Dynamics NAV.

    Combined with Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 its a powerful and very enduser friendly document reporting solution.

    Along with the Microsoft Word add-in the solution also comes with a set of predefined templates that endusers can either use or modify to fit their needs.

    The add-in is available at no charge to customers on Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015.

    Learn more about conditions and availability on Partner Source and Customer Source

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Importing and Exporting Data in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

    • 6 Comments

    In earlier versions of Microsoft Dynamics NAV, you could move or copy all or part of the data in a database by using the Microsoft Dynamics NAV backup functionality. In Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2, the support for the .fbk files was removed, but in Cumulative Update 8 for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2, we introduced Windows PowerShell cmdlets so you can export data from a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database and import it into another Microsoft Dynamics NAV database. You can also export and import data in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Windows client. This functionality is also included in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015.

    You can export and import a single company or all companies in a database, and you can export and import other types of data such as global data, application data, and application objects. When you export data from a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database, the data is stored in a file with the extension .navdata, which is a new file format that is proprietary to Microsoft Dynamics NAV data. You cannot edit the .navdata files in other tools.

    The data that you export is not deleted from the original database. So that means that you can use the functionality to essentially take a copy of your customer’s live data, leave them to continue working, while you import the data into an offline database back at your office for further debugging or other investigation. You can also use the .navdata files to move data to a new database, such as moving a company to a new database when you want to deprecate a database, for example.

    Exporting and Importing Data in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Windows Client

    To export or import data, in the Search box, enter Data File, and then choose the related link.

    To export data, you specify the type of data that you want to export, and when you choose the OK button, you specify where you want to save the file.

    To import data, you specify the .navdata file to import data from, but you can't import an application if the .navdata file contains an application. This is because you can't overwrite the application that is currently open in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Windows client. So the window has one less type of data that you can choose to import:

    If you want to import an application into a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database, you must use the Import-NAVData Windows PowerShell cmdlet.

    Windows PowerShell Cmdlets

    The following table describes the Windows PowerShell cmdlets.

    Name

    Description

    Export-NAVData

    Exports data from a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database. You can export company-specific data, and you can choose to include global data, application data, or application objects.

    Import-NAVData

    Imports data into a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database from a file. You can import all data in the file, or you can choose to include specific companies, global data, application data, or application objects.

    You can only import an application into an empty database.

    Get-NAVDataFile

    Gets information from a file that has been exported from a Microsoft Dynamics NAV database.

    The extracted information includes the types of data that the file contains and any company names.

    The cmdlets take different parameter sets depending on how you connect to the database that you want to export data from or import data into. You can access the database through the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Server instance, or you can access the database directly as described in the following table.

    Access

    Description

    Through the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Server instance.

    Use parameter sets that include –ServerInstance when the database that you want to access is mounted against a Microsoft Dynamics NAV Server instance.

    The user account for the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Server instance must have access to write to the location that is specified by the –FileName parameter.

    Through a direct connection to the database.

    Use parameter sets that include –DatabaseServer and –DatabaseName when the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Server instance is stopped or not available. For example, if you want to import an updated application into a database, you stop the service so that users cannot access the database.

    You must have access to write to the location that is specified by the –FileName parameter.

    You can find more information about this functionality in the MSDN Library.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Merging Application Objects using Windows PowerShell in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

    • 29 Comments

    Upgrading a Microsoft Dynamics NAV solution is time consuming. You have to identify which changes you have to make, you have to upgrade the application objects and the application code, and you might have to move the existing data around so that it fits the new database schema. In Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2 Cumulative Update 9, we introduced a new set of Windows PowerShell cmdlets that can help you through the code upgrade. In Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, the functionality and sample scripts have been further improved.

    You can use the new cmdlets to modify application object source files in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 Development Shell, or by importing the Microsoft.Dynamics.NAV.Model.Tools.psd1 module into the Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE). The new application merge utilities install when you choose the Developer option in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 Setup, or if you add the development environment to another installation option.

    The application merge utilities include the following Windows PowerShell cmdlets:

    Name

    Description

    Merge-NAVApplicationObject

    Compares the changes that have been made between two sets of Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects, and applies the difference to a third set of application objects. The result of the merge is a number of text files with the merged application objects. Any conflicts that the cmdlet cannot merge are identified in conflict files.

    Compare-NAVApplicationObject

    Compares text files that contain Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects, and then calculates the delta between the two versions. The result of the comparison is a number of text files with the calculated delta.

    Update-NAVApplicationObject

    Applies a set of deltas to the specified application objects. The files that describe the delta are generated by the Compare-NAVApplicationObject cmdlet.

    Join-NAVApplicationObjectFile

    Combines multiple application object files into one text file

    Split-NAVApplicationObjectFile

    Splits a text file that contains two or more application objects into separate text files for each application object.

    Get-NAVApplicationObjectProperty

    Gets Microsoft Dynamics NAV application object properties from the specified application object text files.

    Set-NAVApplicationObjectProperty

    Sets Microsoft Dynamics NAV application object properties in the specified application object text files.

    Export-NAVApplicationObjectLanguage

    Exports captions from the specified text files with Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects. The captions are exported to text files.

    Import-NAVApplicationObjectLanguage

    Imports strings in the specified language into text files that contain Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects.

    Join-NAVApplicationObjectLanguageFile

    Combines multiple text files with captions for Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects into one text file.

    Remove-NAVApplicationObjectLanguage

    Deletes captions in the specified language from Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects.

    Split-NAVApplicationObjectLanguageFile

    Splits a text file that contains multilanguage captions for two or more application objects into separate text files for each application object.

    Test-NAVApplicationObjectLanguageFile

    Tests captions in Microsoft Dynamics NAV application objects to test to validate if they have translated strings for the specified languages.

     Getting started

    You can read more about the cmdlets and how to use them in the MSDN Library, but you can also type Get-Help "NAV" in the Windows PowerShell ISE or the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Development Shell.

    If you don’t want to use the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Development Shell, use the Windows PowerShell ISE. But before you can access the cmdlets, you must import the Microsoft.Dynamics.Nav.Model.Tools.psd1 module. Here is an example of the command you can type:

    Import-Module "${env:ProgramFiles(x86)}\Microsoft Dynamics NAV\80\RoleTailored Client\Microsoft.Dynamics.Nav.Model.Tools.psd1" -force

    Get-Help "NAV"

    Now you can see the Help for the cmdlets and take a closer look at the examples for how to use them.

    Now you can see the Help for the cmdlets and take a closer look at the examples for how to use them. You can also see detailed Help for each cmdlet by typing the following command:

    Get-Help cmdletname -detailed

    And you can concentrate on the examples by typing the following command:

    Get-Help cmdletname -examples

     For all of the new cmdlets, the starting point is 3 versions of application objects that you want to merge. The following table describes the three versions of the Microsoft Dynamics NAV application that you want to compare and merge.

    Version

    Description

    Original

    The baseline of the application merge. For example, the Microsoft release of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2.

    Modified

    The updated version of the original. For example, this can be your add-on.

    In many cases, the modified application is the version that contains fewer changes to the original than the version that is the target of the merge. This is because you want to apply fewer changes to a large application rather than applying a large change to a small application.

    Target

    The version of the application that you want to apply the difference between the original and the modified application to. For example, this can be the new major release from Microsoft of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 that you want to apply your modified solution to.

    Each of these versions can be any version that you want to do a three-way merge between. ORIGINAL can be your add-on, MODIFIED can be a customization of your add-on, and TARGET can be a new release of Microsoft Dynamics NAV from Microsoft. But for the purposes of this blog post, we'll keep the definitions as described in the table above.

    As input to the cmdlets, you can provide a text file, a list of text files, or a folder with text files. So you need to export the relevant application objects as text files. Optionally, you can use the development environment command ExportObjects. You can export each application object to a separate text file, or you can export all objects to a single text file. Optionally, you can use the Join-NAVApplicationObjectFile and Split-NAVApplicationObjectFile cmdlets to structure the text files in the way that works better for you. Also, depending on your scenario, you can work with a subset of your application, such as all codeunits, objects within an ID range, or a specific group of objects. Use the tools to get the text files that you need, and take a look at the sample scripts for inspiration.

    The Windows PowerShell sample scripts are available on the product media. Start by opening the HowTo-Start-Import-NAV-Module.ps1 script in the Windows PowerShell IDE, navigate the command prompt to the folder where you placed the samples, and then run the script. Then open one of the other scripts, such as HowTo-Merge-1-General.ps1, and follow the guidance in the script.

    We suggest that you open each of the sample scripts in the Windows PowerShell IDE and read through them to get acquainted with the new cmdlets. Then, set up a small test environment of your own where you can safely use the cmdlets on your own application objects to upgrade your solution to Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015.

     

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Improvements to Bank Reconciliation in the North American Versions

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    Optimization of the processes for payment registration and bank reconciliation has been a focus area in recent releases of Microsoft Dynamics NAV. We have improved the capabilities for handling electronic payments and bank statement import substantially in the generic version of the product.

    NAV 2013 R2 enabled basic cash management with enhanced electronic payment integration focused on SEPA credit transfers and SEPA bank statement import. It also enhanced the usability of the bank reconciliation process with a new and more intuitive user interface.

    NAV 2015 further enhances the electronic payment and payment reconciliation capabilities by adding more bank formats through the Bank Data Conversion Service feature and simplifying payment reconciliation further by importing bank statement files and automatically applying payments to their related open entries on the new Payment Reconciliation Journal page.

    These improvements also enhance the usage of electronic banking features in local versions that do not follow the SEPA standard, such as US, Mexico, and Canada. With Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, customers and partners in North America can choose to use either the existing, North American Bank Rec. Worksheet feature for manual processes or the new, generic Bank Acc. Reconciliation feature that provides statement file import and automatic matching.

    We recommend that our customers and partners in the above markets investigate the two different features and choose the one that fits their needs. To help decide, this document highlights the differences between the two and describes how to make the change. It is very simple to start using the new feature, but it is important that you do so based on a conscious decision.

    Benefits of the New, Generic Bank Reconciliation Feature

    To give a better understanding of the benefits of using the new capabilities, this document will walk through the differences in the process and show how the new pages support a more efficient cash management flow in many scenarios.

    Benefit: Import of bank statement data combined with automatic matching against posted bank ledger entries eliminates trivial, repetitive, and time-consuming tasks. Combined with a new and more intuitive user interface, the feature makes bank account reconciliation fast and easy to do.

    Benefit: The user interface on the Bank Acc. Reconciliation page is simpler and provides a good way to get an overview. Filtering and sorting on the bank ledger entries ensure that the controller is able to identify the entries more efficiently. Note that there are efficiency gains in using the generic Bank Acc. Reconciliation feature even if the process does not involve bank file import. The simplified UI will make the bank reconciliation process simpler and less error-prone.

    Benefit: Adding the capabilities of the Payment Reconciliation Journal page, such as importing and automatically reconciling payments with related open entries, will lead to increased efficiency in the payment registration process, which in turn makes it easier to stay up to date with the company’s cash situation. In addition, good and accurate control of the payment registrations makes the periodic bank reconciliation process easier.

    For more information about the Bank Acc. Reconciliation feature, which was released with Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2, see, for example, the How to: Match Bank Statement Lines with Bank Account Ledger Entries topic in Application Help on MSDN. For more information about Bank Reconciliation features in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, see, for example, Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 Readiness Library.

    Differences from the North American Bank Reconciliation Feature

    Historically, North America, Mexico, and Canada have different requirements for registration of payments and bank account reconciliation than what is required in other countries/regions. The North American bank account reconciliation process has extensive use of checks and deposits as well as a tight relationship with general ledger entries. Therefore, import of electronic bank statements was not implemented in NAV 2013 R2 North America, nor was the export of payment files implemented due to the limitation to SEPA formats, an EU standard. With the new, generic capabilities for electronic payments and bank statement import, it is time to give access to all the new features.

    To be specific, we are comparing two different pages and the processes that they support:

    • In Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2 North America: The Bank Rec. Worksheet page (10120), hereafter referred to as “NA Bank Rec. feature”
    • In Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 W1 (the generic version): The Bank Acc. Reconciliation page (379), hereafter referred to as “Bank Recon. with Auto. Match feature”

    Both the NA Bank Rec. feature and the Bank Recon. With Auto. Match feature compare the open payments registered per bank account in the system with the transactions on the actual bank account.

    To help the user compare the actual transactions, it now possible to import the bank statement as a file. This is only possible with the Bank Recon. With Auto. Match feature, but the paper-based process is possible with both pages. If there is no electronic bank statement to import, the reconciliation can be done by using a suggestion of lines.

    For both pages, the registered payments are either generated automatically when documents are posted, or they are registered through the payment journal or cash receipt journal. In Dynamics NAV 2015, incoming and outgoing payments can also be registered through the Payment Reconciliation Journal page by first importing the bank statement file that represents the payments to your bank.

    Summary of the NA Bank Rec. Feature

    The NA Bank Rec. feature uses the registered payments as a suggestion to what transactions should be cleared in the system. This works well for the paper-based bank statement that the controller typically works with. Payments are categorized in three types: Transaction, Check, and Adjustment. Each line must be manually controlled and cleared, and any necessary adjustments must be created before the bank account reconciliation can be posted.

    The Suggest Lines function generates a proposal of what should be cleared. Transactions that are not marked as cleared when the bank reconciliation is posted are considered outstanding and will appear on the next bank reconciliation worksheet.

    Example:

    In the example below, two check payments and one vendor payment are posted against the WWB-Transfer bank account.

    The lines on the Bank Rec. Worksheet page are added when the users runs the Suggest Lines function. They are automatically divided into the Check pane and the Deposit/Transfer pane. The user must go through each line and clear the amount by using the Checkmark Clear function. They can also use the Mark Lines and Clear Line functions to do bulk edits. Required adjustments are entered in the Adjustment pane and will be posted to the general ledger.

    After clearing the lines, the user must copy the sum identified in the three sub panes to the header as well as calculate the balance of the statement before posting. The feature then validates that the posting corresponds with the general ledger entries.

    The main goal of the NA Bank Rec. feature is that registered payments in the system are manually cleared and that the bank reconciliation is posted with the same amounts as in the general ledger.

    Summary of the Bank Recon. with Auto. Match Feature

    The Bank Recon. With Auto. Match feature also uses the registered payments as a suggestion to the payments that should be cleared. (Note that this feature uses the term “match” instead of “clear”.) The actual statement lines can then be generated by either importing the bank statement file or by using the Suggest Lines function. It is possible to use the automatic matching engine to reconcile as many bank statement lines with bank ledger entries as possible and then manually do the rest.

    Transactions that are not matched when the bank reconciliation is posted are considered outstanding and will appear on the next bank account reconciliation.

    Example:

    As in the example for the NA Bank Rec. feature, there are posted entries in the system, both checks, deposits, and vendor payments against the WWB-Transfer bank account. All open bank ledger entries are shown in the right pane of the Bank Acc. Reconciliation page.

    The bank statement lines that must be reconciled can be imported directly as a bank statement file or they can be manually added by using the Suggest Lines function. The Match Automatically function enables the user to easily match payments.

    If the user wants to focus only on check payments, it is simple to sort by the Check Ledger Entries field.

    Any required adjustments are made by using Transfer to General Journal function for the entries where there is a difference between the statement amount and the bank ledger entry amount (the Difference field has a value).

    The main goal of the Bank Recon. With Auto. Match feature is to register payments in the system, match them with bank statement lines, and then post the bank account reconciliation.

    As illustrated by the two summaries, the same end result is reached with the two pages, but they differ concerning usability, the capability to import a bank statement file, and the automatic matching.

    How to Match Against the General Ledger

    One big difference between the two features is that the NA bank Rec. feature only allows posting if there is exact match against the G/L account. This rule is not enforced in the Bank Recon. with Auto. Match feature unless the bank account is set up for a 1-1 relationship with the G/L account. It will only look at the bank account ledger when validating the posting. To get the same behavior in the two features, ensure that the bank account is mapped to its own G/L account and not to a group.

    How to Turn on the Bank Recon. with Auto. Match Feature

    From the General ledger Setup page, it is possible to choose if the installation should use the Bank Recon. With Auto. Match feature or the existing NA Bank Rec. feature.

    Since both of the bank reconciliation features use a report that is set up in the Report Selections table, a warning that the report will change appears when you change the Bank Recon. With Auto. Match check box. 

    Note: For new installations of Dynamics NAV 2015, the Bank Recon. With Auto Match check box will be selected by default. For upgraded installations, the check box is not selected, meaning that the existing North American feature is used.

    Note: When upgrading and changing to the Bank Recon. with Auto Match feature, the history created with NA Bank Rec. feature is stored and made available from the navigation pane.

    The Bank Acc. Reconciliations page is the same for both features. If the Bank Recon. with Auto. Match check box is selected, the Bank Acc. Reconciliation page (379) opens when the users chooses New in the Bank Acc. Reconciliations page. If the check box is not selected, the Bank Rec. Worksheet page (10120) opens.

    Depending on the Role Center, there will also be easy access to the relevant page through the Activities pane. For example, the Accounting Manager Role Center has a Bank Account Reconciliation to Post tile and an action to open a new bank account reconciliation.

    For upgraded installations, there are several access points to historical posted bank account reconciliations. For example, the Bank Account Card page contains two actions, Statements for Bank Recon. with Auto. Match and Posted Reconciliations for NA Bank Rec.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    New Bank Data Conversion Service hosted on Windows Azure for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

    • 2 Comments

    Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 significantly advances our offering within the area of Cash Management, specifically electronic payments and automated reconciliation.

    As part of these enhancements, we are excited to announce a new partnership with AMC Consult to provide a bank data conversion service hosted on Microsoft Azure and integrated with Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015. The bank data conversion service will be available out of the box and without additional charge to all Microsoft Dynamics NAV customers on the new version of Microsoft Dynamics NAV.

    The bank data conversion service adds value by: 

    • Enabling users to export payment files from Microsoft Dynamics NAV in any format required by their bank to enable efficient processing of outgoing payments.
    • Enabling users to import bank statement files from any bank in the format required by Microsoft Dynamics NAV to enable efficient reconciliation of payments and their bank account.
    • Providing support for many different banks on all Microsoft localized versions of Microsoft Dynamics NAV. 

    The bank data conversion service, along with other new Cash Management features in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, is a great enhancement to the Cash Management offering and represents great value to our customers and partners.

    For more information about the Bank Data Conversion Service feature, see documents under Cash Management in the Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 Readiness Library.    

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    General Availability of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

    • 8 Comments

    We are happy to announce that Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 is now available for download and for requesting licenses for new customers. This release includes improved support for RapidStart code upgrade and data upgrade, ease of use with user experience enhancements and new apps for tablet devices, new document reports, and cash management.

    At Directions US, we presented Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 to 600 partner representatives, and we look forward to presenting to another 1100 or so at Directions EMEA next week. Visit the readiness page to access training and resources about Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, and download the product here. For more information, see the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Help in the MSDN Library.

    Best regards,

    The Dynamics NAV team

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Getting a warning when new demand jeopardizes projected availability?

    • 2 Comments

    How can I get a warning when entering a sales order so I am aware that this demand jeopardizes availability for other demands? That is the Avail. Check Warning functionality. Nothing new. But, I would like to bring focus to this functionality to emphasize the relevance it has.

    There are two parameters in Company Information which are relevant here:

    • "Check Avail. Period Calc.": this defines the period from demand due date where availability calculation will take place. As an example, if this is a sales order, it will check "Shipment Date" + "Check Avail. Period Calc" to determine what is the availability within that period. If availability goes negative, a warning will then arise.
    • "Check Avail. Time Bucket": this defines the bucket of this period. As an example, if we define Month, availability will be rounded to first date of next month when determining the availability period.

    Based on this two, together with the demand due date (ie. "Shipment Date" in the Sales Order), the availability calculation is executed to determine if there would be any availability issue in the future when this new demand is entered (ie. projected inventory goes negative). If so, warning arises. This is an indication to the user for action:

    • Should we go ahead and create the demand as is?
    • Should we try to promise (ATP or CTP) this or any of the other demands ahead to remove negative projected availability?
    • ...

    This warning should be considered as a tool to anticípate issues before planning is run. If we let planning to resolve this issue we might end on these undesiderable scenarios:

    • Lead time does not allow us to react and planning shows an exception (ie. we might require to consume safety stock to address this demand)
    • Demand is now on the frozen zone and this might mean negative stock in the starting date which is shown as an emergency action

    We don't want to run into exception or emergencies in our business. Of course, it might well be the case that planning is able to provide a meaningful action line for our business (ie. this availability issue is later enough that we can react within our lead times and create new replenishment). But, I would still encourage the user to be proactive and check availability when Avail. Check Warning arises.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Understanding Availability info in the Sales Info-Pane

    • 1 Comments

    Starting from NAV 2013 R2 CU8 or NAV 2013 CU15, we are now providing extended info in the Sales Info-Pane (Sales Order Page). This is to allow user to have clear visibility around item availability when making the right decissions to minimize inventory levels and reduce carrying costs. 

    Sales Info-Pane is now providing the following info around availability calculation:

    • Shipment date: just the shipment date from the active sales line. Nothing more than that. True. But, we need to keep in mind this is the date availability calculation is run against.
    • Item availability: this is the result from the availability calculation. It is the projected inventory on the shipment date (Inventory - Gross Requirements + Scheduled Receipts). This defines if we will have available inventory on that date for the current sales orde line.
    • Available inventory: the existing stock which is not reserved. This is the portion of the inventory we can consider as available
    • Scheduled receipt: existing replenishment (purchase order, production order, ...)
    • Reserved receipt: same as above but related only to reserved receipts
    • Gross requirements: demands (sales order, forecast, service lines, job planning lines, production order components, ...)
    • Gross reserved: same as above but related only to reserved gross requirements

    Thus, this is the info that is provided to the user there which should be used to make decissions together with the "Item Availability by ..." views. The info on this Sales Info-Pane provides insight on:

    • stock reserved/not reserved
    • availability in the shipment date
    • other existing demands up to shipment date and how many of these are already reserved
    • other existing receipts up to the shipment date and how many are reserved

    This info should tell the user how much efficient I am with my reservations. How much stock do I currently have? How much is already reserved? How much of this is being used for any existing demand which comes before or on shipment date? Is there any room for improvement on how long are we holding reserved stock to avoid waiting too much time and minimize carrying costs?

    The above together with the "Item availability by ..." views should provide tools to make decissions around this. As an example, if we have an availability issue when entering a new sales order, I would encourage user to open "Item Availability by Event" and determine what is the point in time where availability goes negative. On that date, I would check if we have any reserved stock for a demand with later shipment date. This other sales might instead be promised through CTP and existing stock used to account for negative availability.

    Lastly but not least, I would like to link this blog entry with an earlier one where I stated the fact reservations should only be done when it is strictly required. Otherwise, we might disturb planning and we might increase inventory levels if reservations are not made on a meaningful business scenario. On this assumption is where user should benefit from this Sales Info-Pane.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Order promising: shall we reserve available replenishment to avoid this is used when promising other demand?

    • 0 Comments

    Order promising is about using available-to-promise or capable-to-promise functionality to commit dates with customers. There is a functional difference between those two:

    • ATP is based on existing replenishment, on what is available to promise. This has nothing to do about reservations. We are just running the availability calculation.
    • CTP is based on creating new replenishment. Here, we need to create an action line in the planning (or req.) worksheet which defines the new replenishment required. This action line requires reservation to ensure that new replenishment is link to the committed demand.

    Having said this, asume we have a reservation for an existing replenishment, does it mean the above that we will just use that replenishment when running order promising for another sales? No. If that replenishment is reserved, it is not available for the order promising.

    Now, going back to the question here: assume I run ATP and promised a sales order. Should I reserve the sales order against the replenishment to ensure no other demand is using it? I would say No. Two reasons:

    • Even when there is another sales order, you might want to use this replenishment for that new demand since this might be earlier and we will reduce carrying costs. An example is when you promised a sales order for Dec 2014 based on existing stock. If another sales order comes for October 2015, why not using the stock here? We will reduce inventory costs here if we are using this for October and use CTP to create a new replenishment for the other demand.
    • If you are using reservations, you will disturb planning. Assume you have a demand/supply set reserved. This will be ignored by planning since it is considered as satisfied. Instead what we will like to do is to proceed with a planning run to ensure all demands and supplies are going through the planning parameters and an optimal plan is achieved. For instance, assume we reserve a demand to a purchase order. And, for the same date with have another demand. Here, we might run CTP since there is no availability. This will create a new replenishment for this second demand. Up to here, planning parameters from item card are not considered. However, we would like to still calculate plan to optimize this and combine both replenishment into one purchase order if this is a lot-for-lot ítem. If replenishment is reserved against the demand, it will be ignored and won't be combined into one purchase.

    But, if we are not using reservations with ATP, how will I prevent that promising a new order will not jeopardize my earlier promised demands? That is a very good question. Here, we have the Avail. Check Warning functionality. If you are entering a new sales order and this jeopardizes availability for another existing sales, it will raise a warning. User is required now to check availability here and perform actions (ie. re-promise the existing sales order and use available for new one). Avail. Check Warning is based on "Check Avail. Period Calc." and "Check Avail. Time Bucket" (Company Information) to determine the horizon from shipment date where this availability is checked. In other words, this horizon determines the demands which will be considered when checking if new sales jeopardizes availability.

     

     

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    A SCM perspective to the Intercompany functionality

    • 2 Comments

    "Intercompany resides in the Financial Management series in NAV". "IC is designed for those users who control multiple business entities to separate accounting processes". "User can enter intercompany transaction Information only once in the appropiate documents". "Users of previous versions of the product needed to re-key all Information manually for all companies and transactions".

    All the above are excerpts from IC White paper. So, this is nothing I am trying you to evangelize you about.

    And, that is what my blog is about: if you are a SCM individual, Intercompany needs to be understood as an "administrative" functionality to copy documents/transactions from one side (one IC company) to the other. This will reduce errors when manipulating orders and transactions. Good enough. But, our standard SCM processes should not change here. We still need to have those independant. Some examples:

    • Variants: One company might use variants, the other might not. Or, one IC company (the main warehouse) might have unified or agreed naming around "Item No.". But, this does not mean all other companies follow the same naming. As company B in IC, I might want to get different item codes for each íiem+variant since that is a different manufacturing process in my side.  Or, I might only have that item+variant in my other IC company and don't need to define it. Or, I might have different naming convention in this company B since it is what makes sense on my business. This is why NAV is not transferring the variants by default. However, we still have functionality to offer: cross-reference functionality. If you use this, you can define what is the Item No. that your other IC company (which is a vendor/Customer here). That will work.
    • Unit of measure: same thing applies here. We might have different UOMs on each different company. Use cross-reference.
    • Locations: sometimes we are requested to transfer locations which are set on a IC order. As an example, if I set my IC purchase order for location WHITE, it means I am expecting to receive the ítem in location WHITE. And, your vendor might send this ítem from different locations ... and this is the vendor internal processes to define what location this needs to be sent to. So, if you are just copying the location, it means that one IC company is buying an ítem expected to be receive in WHITE location and the other IC company will ship the same ítem from same WHITE location. From a standard and generic processes, this might not be valid in the majority of the scenarios. We might have a central warehouse (WHITE, IC company A) which is shipping to the subsidiaries (BLUE, IC company B). That is why SCM BUSINESS process might still be independant and not to copy the locations.
    • Planning: we cannot interfere our planning with IC. We might want to transfer data from one IC company to the other to try to commit to that. But, this is not valid for all fields. An example is "Promised Receipt Date" in Purchase Order. We cannot expect that if are filling this, that IC will transfer to the sales order as "Promised Delivery Date". Who should promise and commit this order? The vendor. And, vendor's company has a sales order to promise. We can use Order Promising functionality here and might want to copy this into the purchase order of the other IC company. But, not the other way around.

    Thus, Intercompany is about avoiding re-entering order data and transactions. But, it is not to avoid what your BUSINESS is about. If you need to promise an order or if you need to define cross-references, you still need to promise the order or still to define cross-references. IC is not to replace this. 

    This is the reason why Intercompany White paper provides the following note: "There are certain restrictions applying to the items that can occur in inter-company transactions. Not all item information can be transferred between companies. Variant codes, unit of measure, and location, for example, cannot be transferred. You need to add manually the location information to any document lines that require it ... You can use several different methods for mapping item numbers between companies: When item numbers are the same, if Common number from the e-commerce tab on the Item Card is to be used, or if the Vendor Item Catalog is to be used to map item numbers, Intercompany Postings assumes that variant codes and units of measure are the same for the item in both companies. If you need variant codes, use the Cross-Reference functionality". So, this is not to be seen as a limitation but to ensure businesses processes in IC companies are still independant.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015

    • 11 Comments

    On September 14th, we presented Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 to 600 partner representatives at Directions US, and we are proud to announce that General Availability of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 will be October 1st 2014. Already today partners can download Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015 from PartnerSource and start investigating the new functionality. Visit the new readiness page to access training and resources about Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, and download the product here. For more information, see the Microsoft Dynamics NAV Help in the MSDN Library.

    Partners who did not attend Directions US and want to learn more about Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2015, explore business opportunities, and network with other partners should sign-up for Directions EMEA event October 8-10 in Poznan, Poland. Make sure to check back here on The NAV Team Blog for more updates in the coming weeks.

    Best regards,

    The Dynamics NAV team

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Cumulative Update 18 for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 has been released

    • 2 Comments

    Cumulative update 18 includes all application and platform hotfixes and regulatory features that have been released for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013.

    The cumulative update includes hotfixes that apply to all countries and hotfixes specific to the following local versions: 

         *   AU - Australia

         *   AT - Austria

         *   BE - Belgium

         *   CH - Switzerland

         *   DE - Germany

         *   DK - Denmark

         *   ES - Spain

         *   FI   - Finland

         *   FR - France

         *   IS  - Iceland

         *   IT   - Italy

         *   NA - North America

         *   NL - Netherlands

         *   NO - Norway

         *   NZ - New Zealand

         *   SE - Sweden

         *   UK - United Kingdom

    Where to find cumulative update 18

    You can download cumulative update 18 from KB 2992503 - Cumulative Update 18 for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 (Build 37798).

    For a full list of all hotfixes included in cumulative updates for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013, see the following CustomerSource and PartnerSource pages:

    CustomerSource:

         *  Overview of Released Application Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013

         *  Overview of Released Platform Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013

    PartnerSource:

         *   Overview of Released Application Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013

         *  Overview of Released Platform Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013

    More Information

    For a list of all released cumulative updates, see Released Cumulative Updates for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013.

  • Microsoft Dynamics NAV Team Blog

    Cumulative Update 11 for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2 has been released

    • 3 Comments

    Cumulative update 11 includes all application and platform hotfixes and regulatory features that have been released for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2.

     The cumulative update includes hotfixes that apply to all countries and hotfixes specific to the following local versions:

    •   AU - Australia
    •   AT - Austria
    •   BE - Belgium
    •   CH – Switzerland
    •   CZ – Czech Republic
    •   DE - Germany
    •   DK - Denmark
    •   ES - Spain
    •   FI  - Finland
    •   FR - France
    •   IS - Iceland
    •   IT - Italy
    •   NA - North America
    •   NL - Netherlands
    •   NO - Norway
    •   NZ - New Zealand
    •   RU – Russia
    •   SE - Sweden
    •   UK - United Kingdom

    Where to find cumulative update 11

    You can download cumulative update 11 from KB 2992495  – Cumulative Update 11 for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2 (Build 37799). 

    For a full list of all hotfixes included in cumulative updates for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2, see the following CustomerSource and PartnerSource pages:

    CustomerSource:

         *  Overview of Released Application Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2

         *  Overview of Released Platform Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2

    PartnerSource

         *   Overview of Released Application Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2

         *  Overview of Released Platform Hotfixes for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2

    More Information

     For more information about cumulative updates for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2, see Announcement of update rollups for Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 R2.

     

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