Introduction

In the first article of the series we discussed how to exchange messages with an orchestration via a two-way WCF Receive Location using the Duplex Message Exchange Pattern. This form of bi-directional communication is characterized by the ability of both the service and the client to send messages to each other independently either using one-way or request/reply messaging. In a service-oriented architecture or a service bus composed of multiple, heterogeneous systems, interactions between autonomous client and service applications are asynchronous and loosely-coupled. All communications require published and discoverable service contracts, well-known data formats and a shared communication infrastructure. In this context, the use of asynchronous message patterns allows to increase the agility, scalability and flexibility of the overall architecture and helps decreasing the loose coupling of individual systems. In the second part of the article  I’ll show you how to implement an asynchronous communication between a client application and a WCF Workflow Service running within IIS\AppFabric Hosting Services using the Durable Duplex Correlation provided by WF 4.0. Besides, I’ll demonstrate how to create a custom Activity for extending AppFabric Tracking with user-defined events and how to exploit the XML-based data transformation capabilities provided by the new BizTalk Server Mapper directly in a WF project thanks to the new Mapper Activity contained in the AppFabric Connect. The latter combines rich proven features of BizTalk Server 2010 with the flexible development experience of .NET to allow users to easily develop simple integration applications. Besides, AppFabric Connect allows you to extend the reach of your on-premise applications and services into Windows Azure AppFabric. In the future I’ll show you how to get advantage of the functionality offered by the AppFabric Connect to expose or move your BizTalk applications to the cloud using the Windows Azure AppFabric Service Bus. If you are interested in this subject, you can read the following articles:

Before explaining the architecture of the demo, let me briefly introduce and discuss some of the techniques that I used to implement my solution.

Correlation in WF 4.0

If you are a WF or a BizTalk developer, you are surely familiar with the concept of correlation. Typically, at runtime workflows or orchestrations have multiple instances executing simultaneously. Therefore, when a workflow service implements an asynchronous communication pattern to exchange messages with other services, correlation provides the mechanism to ensure that messages are sent to the appropriate workflow instance. Correlation enables relating workflow service messages to each other or to the application instance state, such as a reply to an initial request, or a particular order ID to the persisted state of an order-processing workflow. Workflow Foundation 4.0 provides 2 different categories of correlation called, respectively, Protocol-Based Correlation and Content-Based Correlation. Protocol-based correlations use data provided by the message delivery infrastructure to provide the mapping between messages. Messages that are correlated using protocol-based correlation are related to each other using an object in memory, such as a RequestContext, or by a token provided by the transport protocol. Content-based correlations relate messages to each other using application-specified data. Messages that are correlated using content-based correlation are related to each other by some application-defined data in the message, such as a customer number.

Protocol-Based Correlation

Protocol-based correlation uses the transport mechanism to relate messages to each other and the appropriate workflow instance. Some system-provided protocol correlation mechanisms include Request-Reply correlation and Context-Based correlation. A Request-Reply correlation is used to correlate a single pair of messaging activities to form a two-way synchronous inbound or outbound operation, such as a Send paired with a ReceiveReply, or a Receive paired with a SendReply. The Visual Studio 2010 Workflow Designer also provides a set of activity templates to quickly implement this pattern. A context-based correlation is based on the context exchange mechanism described in the .NET Context Exchange Protocol Specification. To use context-based correlation, a context-based binding such as BasicHttpContextBinding, WSHttpContextBinding or NetTcpContextBinding must be used on the endpoint.

For more information about protocol correlation, see the following topics on MSDN:

For more information about using the Visual Studio 2010 Workflow Designer activity templates, see Messaging Activities. For sample code, see the Durable Duplex and NetContextExchangeCorrelation samples.

Content-Based Correlation

Content-based correlation uses data in the message to associate it to a particular workflow instance. Unlike protocol-based correlation, content-based correlation requires the application developer to explicitly state where this data can be found in each related message. Activities that use content-based correlation specify this message data by using a MessageQuerySet. Content-based correlation is useful when communicating with services that do not use one of the context bindings such as BasicHttpContextBinding. For more information about content-based correlation, see Content Based Correlation. For sample code, see the Content-Based Correlation and Correlated Calculator samples.

In my demo I used 2 different types of protocol-based correlation, respectively, the Request-Reply Correlation and the Durable Duplex Correlation. In the third part of this article I’ll show you how to use the Content-Based Correlation to implement an asynchronous communication between the WF workflow service and the underlying BizTalk orchestration.

AppFabric Monitoring and User-Defined Events

AppFabric provides new options and tools to monitor and troubleshoot the health of WCF and WF services running on IIS. The monitoring features support centralized event collection and analysis for WCF and WF services running on a single server. The monitoring features include the following:

  • A monitoring infrastructure that collects events from WCF and WF services and stores them in a Monitoring database.
  • A Monitoring database schema for instrumentation data. The Monitoring database stores tracked events from WCF and WF services in one unified data store.
  • A Windows Service called AppFabric Event Collection Service that, acting as an ETW consumer, collects and stores track events to the AppFabric Monitoring database.
  • An ApplicationServer module for Windows PowerShell that exposes monitoring cmdlets used to manage the Monitoring database and event collector sources.
    An ApplicationServer module for Windows PowerShell that exposes tracing cmdlets, which you can use to configure tracing profiles, enable or disable tracing, and query trace logs.
    A Monitoring Dashboard and other extensions to the IIS Manager console. You can use the Monitoring Dashboard to view selected metrics from the Monitoring database. You can use the IIS Manager extensions to manage monitoring databases, set the monitoring level, and query and analyze tracked events.

In a nutshell, here’s how AppFabric Monitoring works: event data is emitted from WCF and WF services and is sent to a high-performance Event Tracing for Windows (ETW) session. The data sent to an ETW session includes WCF analytic trace events and WF tracking record events emitted by using the ETW Tracking Participant. The AppFabric Event Collector Service harvests this event data from the above ETW session and stores this information in the Monitoring database. AppFabric monitoring tools can be used to analyze these events when they are persisted in the database. The AppFabric Monitoring features are fully documented on MSDN, so I will not cover this subject in detail.  For more information on AppFabric Monitoring and ETW, see the following articles:

AppFabric Monitoring and Windows Workflow Tracking provide visibility into workflow execution. They provide the necessary infrastructure to track the execution of a workflow instance. The WF tracking infrastructure transparently instruments a workflow to emit records reflecting key events during the execution. In particular, AppFabric allows to configure, at a service level, a built-in or custom Tracking Profile to filter tracked data. Besides, WF provides the infrastructure and components to emit user-defined events to track custom application data. This brings us to the next topic.

Custom Activity for tracking User-Defined Events

While the base activity library includes a rich palette of activities for interacting with services, objects, and collections, it does not provide any activities for tracking user-defined events. Therefore, I decided to create a reusable WF custom activity to track user-defined events within any WF workflow service. This allows me to use the AppFabric Dashboard to analyze user events emitted at runtime by my WF services using my component. WF 4.0 provides a hierarchy of activity base classes from which you can choose from when building a custom activity. At a high level, the four base classes can be described as follows: 

  • Activity – used to model activities by composing other activities, usually defined using XAML.
  • CodeActivity – a simplified base class when you need to write some code to get work done.
  • AsyncCodeActivity – used when your activity perform some work asynchronously.
  • NativeActivity – when your activity needs access to the runtime internals, for example to schedule other activities or create bookmarks

For more information on WF and custom activities, see the following article:

The following table shows the code of my CustomTrackingActivity class.

#region Using Directives
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Activities;
using System.Activities.Tracking;
using System.ComponentModel;
#endregion

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.WorkflowActivities
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This class can be used in any WF workflow to track
    /// user-defined events to any registered tracking providers
    /// </summary>
    [Designer(typeof(CustomTrackingActivityDesigner))]
    public sealed class CustomTrackingActivity : CodeActivity
    {
        #region Activity Arguments
        // Text Argument
        [DefaultValue(null)]
        public InArgument<string> Text { get; set; } 
        
        // TraceLevel Property
        public TraceLevel TraceLevel { get; set; }
        #endregion

        #region Protected Methods
        /// <summary>
        /// Tracks the text message contained in the Text argument.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="context">The execution context under which the activity executes.</param>
        protected override void Execute(CodeActivityContext context)
        {
            // Obtain the runtime value of the Text and TraceLevel input arguments
            string text = context.GetValue(this.Text);

            // Create and initialize a custom tracking record 
            CustomTrackingRecord record = new CustomTrackingRecord(text, this.TraceLevel);

            // Sends the specified custom tracking record to any registered tracking providers
            context.Track(record);
        } 
        #endregion
    }
}

The CustomTrackingActivity class is derived from the CodeActivity base class and overrides the Execute. The latter has a single parameter of type CodeActivityContext which represents the execution context under which the activity executes. In particular, the context object exposes a method called Track that can be used to send a custom tracking record to any registered tracking providers. The tracking provider used by AppFabric is the EtwTrackingParticipant. For more information, see the following article:

The CustomTrackingActivity class exposes 2 properties:

  • Text: contains the message to track at runtime. This latter can be declaratively set using Workflow Designer.
  • TraceLevel: specifies the intended trace level for the message.

The code of the custom activity is very straightforward and self-explaining. First, the method invokes the GetValue method exposed by the context to retrieve the value of the Text property, next it creates a new instance of the CustomTrackingRecord class and finally it calls the Track method on the context object to track the user-defined event. This activity can surely be extended to extract and track business relevant data associated with the workflow variables.

To control the look and feel of the custom Activity, I added an Activity Designer item to my project. In particular, this allowed me to perform the following customizations:

  • Specify a custom icon in the top-left corner of the Activity
  • Create an ExpressionTextBox control and bind it to the Text property of the custom activity.
  • Create a ComboBox control and bind it to the TraceLevel property of the custom activity.

 

Quotes_Icon Note
To associate the Activity Designer with the custom activity I decorated this with a DesignerAttribute and I specified the type of the Designer class as argument.

The following table contains the XAML code for the designer. I’m certainly not a WPF expert, so even if there’s probably a better way to achieve the same result, the code below perfectly fits my needs.

<sap:ActivityDesigner x:Class="Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.WorkflowActivities.CustomTrackingActivityDesigner"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
    xmlns:diag="clr-namespace:System.Diagnostics;assembly=system"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:sap="clr-namespace:System.Activities.Presentation;assembly=System.Activities.Presentation"
    xmlns:sapv="clr-namespace:System.Activities.Presentation.View;assembly=System.Activities.Presentation">
    <sap:ActivityDesigner.Resources>
        <ObjectDataProvider MethodName="GetValues"
                        ObjectType="{x:Type sys:Enum}"
                        x:Key="TraceLevelValues">
            <ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
                <x:Type TypeName="diag:TraceLevel" />
            </ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
        </ObjectDataProvider>
    </sap:ActivityDesigner.Resources>
    <sap:ActivityDesigner.Icon>
        <DrawingBrush>
            <DrawingBrush.Drawing>
                <ImageDrawing>
                    <ImageDrawing.Rect>
                        <Rect Location="0,0" Size="25,25" ></Rect>
                    </ImageDrawing.Rect>
                    <ImageDrawing.ImageSource>
                        <BitmapImage UriSource="Resources/ActivityIcon.gif"/>
                    </ImageDrawing.ImageSource>
                </ImageDrawing>
            </DrawingBrush.Drawing>
        </DrawingBrush>
    </sap:ActivityDesigner.Icon>
    <Grid Margin="10">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="30"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="30"/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition/>
            <ColumnDefinition/>
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Label Grid.Row="0" 
               Grid.Column="0"
               VerticalAlignment="Center">Text:</Label>
        <sapv:ExpressionTextBox Grid.Row="0" 
                                Grid.Column="1"
                                x:Name="expText"
                                OwnerActivity="{Binding Path=ModelItem, Mode=TwoWay}"
                                Expression="{Binding Path=ModelItem.Text.Expression, Mode=TwoWay}"
                                ExpressionType="{x:Type TypeName=sys:String}"
                                HintText="Message Text"
                                VerticalAlignment="Center"
                              />
        <Label Grid.Row="1" 
               Grid.Column="0"
               VerticalAlignment="Center">TraceLevel:</Label>
        <ComboBox Grid.Row="1" 
                  Grid.Column="1"
                  VerticalAlignment="Center"
                  Name="myComboBox" 
                  ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource TraceLevelValues}}"
                  SelectedValue="{Binding Path=ModelItem.TraceLevel, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
    </Grid>
</sap:ActivityDesigner>

To develop my custom activity, I used the following resources:

If you are interested in how to track user-defined events in a WCF service running within AppFabric, you can review the following article:

 

Transforming Messages within a WF Workflow using the Mapper Activity

As you will see in the next section, my demo is composed of 3 major tiers:

  • A Windows Forms client application.
  • A WCF Workflow Service running in Windows Server AppFabric.
  • A BizTalk Application composed of an orchestration and a request-response WCF Receive Location.

In a few words, the WCF Workflow Service receives a request from the client application and invokes the downstream orchestration via a WCF Receive Location. The format of the request and response messages exchanged by the WCF workflow service, respectively, with the client and BizTalk applications is obviously different to reflect real-world EAI scenarios where heterogeneous systems use different schemas to represent the same entities. Now, in this case, message transformation could be configured in a declarative way to run on the BizTalk receive location that receives requests and returns related responses.  Nevertheless, since one of the objectives of this article was introducing the new Mapper activity available in AppFabric Connect, I decided to implement message transformation within my WCF workflow service. AppFabric Connect provides WF developers access to both the BizTalk Mapper and the BizTalk Adapter Pack 2010. Utilizing the Mapper activity, developers can exploit the features supplied by the BizTalk Server 2010 Mapper to design and use transformation maps in a WF workflow service hosted in IIS\AppFabric.

Using the Mapper activity in a WF workflow is quite straightforward: first of all, you have to define the WCF data contract classes that model the source and destination messages. Thus, in my solution I created 5 data contract classes to model the messages exchanged by WCF workflow service, respectively, with the client and BizTalk applications:

  • WFRequest: defines the request message  sent by the client application to the WCF workflow service.
  • WFAck: specifies the structure of the acknowledgement message sent by the WCF workflow service to the client application.
  • WFResponse: represents the the response message returned by the WCF workflow service to the client application.
  • BizTalkRequest: defines the request message sent by the WCF workflow service to the BizTalk application.
  • BizTalkResponse: represents the the response message returned by the BizTalk application to the WCF workflow service

These 5 data classes belong to the same Class Library project called DataContracts. For your convenience, below I included the code of these components.

WFRequest Class

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.DataContracts
{
    [DataContract(Name="Request", Namespace="http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep/wf")]
    public class WFRequest : IExtensibleDataObject
    {
        #region Private Fields
        private ExtensionDataObject extensionData;
        private string id;
        private string question;
        private int delay;
        #endregion

        #region Public Constructors
        public WFRequest()
        {
            this.id = null;
            this.question = null;
            this.delay = 0;
        }

        public WFRequest(string question, int delay)
        {
            this.id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
            this.question = question;
            this.delay = delay;
        }
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties
        public ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData
        {
            get
            {
                return this.extensionData;
            }
            set
            {
                this.extensionData = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Id", IsRequired = true, Order = 1, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Id
        {
            get
            {
                return this.id;
            }
            set
            {
                this.id = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Question", IsRequired = true, Order = 2, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Question
        {
            get
            {
                return this.question;
            }
            set
            {
                this.question = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Delay", IsRequired = true, Order = 3, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public int Delay
        {
            get
            {
                return this.delay;
            }
            set
            {
                this.delay = value;
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

WFAck

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.DataContracts
{
    [DataContract(Name = "Ack", Namespace = "http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep/wf")]
    public class WFAck : IExtensibleDataObject
    {
        #region Private Fields
        private ExtensionDataObject extensionData;
        private string id;
        private string ack;
        #endregion

        #region Public Constructors
        public WFAck()
        {
            this.id = null;
            this.ack = null;
        }

        public WFAck(string id, string question)
        {
            this.id = id;
            this.ack = question;
        }
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties
        public ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData
        {
            get
            {
                return this.extensionData;
            }
            set
            {
                this.extensionData = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Id", IsRequired = true, Order = 1, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Id
        {
            get
            {
                return this.id;
            }
            set
            {
                this.id = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Ack", IsRequired = true, Order = 2, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Ack
        {
            get
            {
                return this.ack;
            }
            set
            {
                this.ack = value;
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

WFResponse

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.DataContracts
{
    [DataContract(Name = "Response", Namespace = "http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep/wf")]
    public class WFResponse : IExtensibleDataObject
    {
        #region Private Fields
        private ExtensionDataObject extensionData;
        private string id;
        private string answer;
        #endregion

        #region Public Constructors
        public WFResponse()
        {
            this.id = null;
            this.answer = null;
        }

        public WFResponse(string id, string question)
        {
            this.id = id;
            this.answer = question;
        }
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties
        public ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData
        {
            get
            {
                return this.extensionData;
            }
            set
            {
                this.extensionData = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Id", IsRequired = true, Order = 1, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Id
        {
            get
            {
                return this.id;
            }
            set
            {
                this.id = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMember(Name = "Answer", IsRequired = true, Order = 2, EmitDefaultValue = true)]
        public string Answer
        {
            get
            {
                return this.answer;
            }
            set
            {
                this.answer = value;
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

BizTalkRequest

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.DataContracts
{
    [DataContract(Name="Request", Namespace="http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep")]
    public partial class BizTalkRequest : IExtensibleDataObject
    {
        #region Private Fields
        private ExtensionDataObject extensionData;
        private string id;
        private string question;
        private int delay;
        #endregion

        #region Public Constructors
        public BizTalkRequest()
        {
            this.id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
            this.question = null;
            this.delay = 0;
        }

        public BizTalkRequest(string question, int delay)
        {
            this.id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
            this.question = question;
            this.delay = delay;
        }
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties
        public ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData
        {
            get
            {
                return this.extensionData;
            }
            set
            {
                this.extensionData = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMemberAttribute(IsRequired = true, Order = 1)]
        public string Id
        {
            get
            {
                return this.id;
            }
            set
            {
                this.id = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMemberAttribute(IsRequired = true, Order = 2)]
        public string Question
        {
            get
            {
                return this.question;
            }
            set
            {
                this.question = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMemberAttribute(IsRequired = true, Order = 3)]
        public int Delay
        {
            get
            {
                return this.delay;
            }
            set
            {
                this.delay = value;
            }
        } 
        #endregion
    }
}

BizTalkResponse

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.DataContracts
{
    [DataContract(Name = "Response", Namespace = "http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep")]
    public partial class BizTalkResponse : IExtensibleDataObject
    {
        #region Private Fields
        private ExtensionDataObject extensionData;
        private string id;
        private string answer;
        #endregion

        #region Public Properties
        public ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData
        {
            get
            {
                return this.extensionData;
            }
            set
            {
                this.extensionData = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMemberAttribute(IsRequired = true, Order = 1)]
        public string Id
        {
            get
            {
                return this.id;
            }
            set
            {
                this.id = value;
            }
        }

        [DataMemberAttribute(IsRequired = true, Order = 2)]
        public string Answer
        {
            get
            {
                return this.answer;
            }
            set
            {
                this.answer = value;
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

The next step was to define a variable for each of the messages exchanged by the WCF workflow service with the client and the BizTalk application. The picture below shows the 5 data contract variables that I created within the outermost Sequential activity within my WCF workflow service. This activity contains also  the correlation handle used by the workflow to correlate the request message sent by the client application with the corresponding response message. We will expand on this point later.

WorkflowServiceVariables

Then I created a map to transform a WFRequest object into a BizTalkRequest object and another map to transform a BizTalkResponse object into an instance of the WFResponse class. In a nutshell, these are the steps I followed to create the first of the 2 transformation maps. After installing the BizTalk Server 2010 developer tools and the WCF LOB Adapter SDK, you can see the Mapper activity on the Windows Workflow Activity Palette under a tab called BizTalk, shown in the picture below.MapperActivity

When you drag the Mapper activity onto a workflow, it prompts you for the data types of the source and destination message.  The dialog  allows you to choose primitive types, or custom types. To create the first map, I chose the WFRequest type as InputDataContractType and the BizTalkRequest as OutputDataContractType as shown in the picture below.SelectTypes

When I clicked the OK button, an un-configured Mapper activity appeared in my workflow. After setting the explicit names of my source (WFRequest) and destination variables (BizTalkRequest) in the Mapper activity’s Property window, I clicked the Edit button and chose to create a new map.

SelectAMap

The Select a map dialog allows to create a new map or select an existing one based on data contract types chosen at the previous step. If you are creating a new map, the activity will generate the XML schemas for the selected input and output data contract types and a new BizTalk map (.btm) file. Differently than in BizTalk Server, XML schemas and map files don’t need to published to a centralized database, but they become an integral part of the project. You can eventually define your maps in a separate project from your workflows to increase the reusability and maintenance level of these artifacts.

Upon clicking the OK button, the BizTalk Mapper Designer appeared and I could create my transformation map as shown in the picture below. When using the BizTalk Mapper Designer within a WF workflow application, you have full access to all the features and functoids that BizTalk developers normally use in their solution.

MapAt runtime, the input data is first serialized into XML and then transformed using the XSLT generated from the map file. The message resulting from the transformation is finally de-serialized back into an object of the output type. At this regard, the Mapper activity decides to use the XmlSerializer only if the type is annotated with the XmlTypeAttribute or XmlRootAttribute. If the activity is an array type, the attribute check will be performed on the array element type as well. In all other cases, DataContractSerializer is used.

Quotes_Icon Note
When creating a map it is possible to use Advanced Options to change the Serializer to use for Input and the Serializer to use for Result from Auto to DataContractSerializer or XMLSerializer. Manually setting the serializer is not recommended however and extreme caution should be exercised when doing this because specifying the wrong serializer will cause serialization to fail at runtime.

For more information on the Mapper Activity, see the following articles by Trace Young:

After stacking the necessary (LEGO) bricks,  we are now ready to build our solution, so let’s get started.

Using a Durable Duplex Correlation to communicate with a WF Workflow

The following picture depicts the architecture of the use case. The idea behind the application is quite straightforward: a Windows Forms application submits a question to a WCF workflow service hosted in IIS\AppFabric and asynchronously waits for the related answer. The WCF workflow service uses the Mapper activity to transform the incoming request in a format suitable to be consumed by the underlying BizTalk application and synchronously invokes the SyncMagic8Ball orchestration via a WCF-NetTcp Receive Location. The orchestration is a BizTalk version of the notorious Magic 8 Ball toy and it randomly returns one of 20 standardized answers.  Upon receiving the response message from BizTalk, the WCF workflow service applies another map using the Mapper activity and returns the resulting message to the client application. In this version, the client application communicates with the WCF workflow service using a pattern called Durable Duplex Correlation, whereas the WCF workflow service communicates with the BizTalk application using a synchronous message exchange pattern. In the next and final article of the series, I’ll show you how to use the Content-Based Correlation to implement an asynchronous message exchange between the WCF workflow service and the downstream BizTalk orchestration.

SyncMagic8BallUseCase

Message Flow

  1. The  Windows Forms Client Application enables a user to specify a question and a delay in seconds. When the user presses the Ask button, a new request message containing the question and the delay is created and sent to a the WCF workflow service. Before sending the first message, the client application creates and opens a service host to expose a callback endpoint that the workflow can invoke to return the response message. In particular, the binding used to expose this callback contract is the NetTcpBinding, whereas the binding used to send the request message to the WCF workflow service is the NetTcpContextBinding. We will expand on this point in the next sections when we’ll analyze the client-side code.
  2. The WCF workflow service receives the request message of type WFRequest using the Receive activity of a ReceiveAndSendReply composed activity. Then it uses this activity to initialize the callback correlation handle.
  3. The WCF workflow service uses the CustomTrackingActivity to keep track of individual processing steps and uses an instance of the Mapper activity to transform the WFRequest object into an instance of the BizTalkRequest class.
  4. The WCF workflow service uses a WCF proxy activity to send the BizTalkRequest message to the WCF-NetTcp receive location exposed by the BizTalk application.
  5. The WCF receive location receives the request message and the XmlReceive pipeline promotes the MessageType context property.
  6. The Message Agent submits the request message to the MessageBox (BizTalkMsgBoxDb).
  7. A new instance of the SyncMagic8Ball orchestration receives the request message via a two-way logical port and uses a custom helper component called XPathHelper to read the value of the Question and Delay elements from the inbound message.
  8. The SyncMagic8Ball orchestration invokes the SetResponse static method exposed by the ResponseHelper class to build the response message containing the answer to this question contained in the request message. The response message is then published to the MessageBox (BizTalkMsgBoxDb) by the Message Agent.
  9. The response message is retrieved by the WCF-NetTcp Receive Location.
  10. The PassThruTransmit send pipeline is executed by the WCF-NetTcp Receive Location.
  11. The response message is returned to the WCF workflow service.
  12. The WCF workflow service uses a Mapper activity to transform the BizTalkResponse object into an instance of the WFRequest class.
  13. The WCF workflow service uses a Send activity to send back the response message to the client application. The Send activity is configured to use the callback correlation that contains the URI of the callback endpoint exposed by the client application.

 

Durable Duplex

One of the objective of this post is demonstrating how to use a duplex communication pattern to exchange messages between a client application and a WCF workflow service running within IIS\AppFabric. However, WF 4.0 doesn't directly support WCF Duplex communication, but it supports a different pattern called Durable Duplex. This pattern requires the client and server applications to use a separate WCF channel to exchange, respectively, the request and response message and this enables them to use a different binding on the callback channel than the one used to send the original request. Since the channels used to exchange the request and response message are independent, the callback can happen at any time in the future. The only requirement for the caller is to have an active endpoint listening for the callback message. The Durable Duplex pattern allows a client application to communicate with a WCF workflow service in a long-running conversation.
To use durable duplex correlation, the client  application and the WCF workflow service must use a context-enabled binding that supports two-way operations, such as NetTcpContextBinding or WSHttpContextBinding. This requirement applies only to the WCF channel used to exchange the initial request, whereas any binding can be used by the WCF channel used by the callback. Before sending a request message, the client application registers a ClientCallbackAddress with the URI of the callback Endpoint. The WCF workflow service receives this data with a Receive activity and then uses it on its own Endpoint in the Send activity to send a response or a notification message back to the caller. For more information on the Durable Duplex Correlation, see the following topic on MSDN:

Client Code

The following table contains code used by the client application to invoke the WCF workflow service using the Durable Duplex communication pattern.

private void btnAsk_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        int delay = 0;
        //  Question Validation
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtQuestion.Text))
        {
            WriteToLog(QuestionCannotBeNull);
            txtQuestion.Focus();
            return;
        }
        //  Delay Validation
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtDelay.Text) ||
            !int.TryParse(txtDelay.Text, out delay))
        {
            WriteToLog(DelayMustBeANumber);
            txtDelay.Focus();
            return;
        }
        // Endpoint Validation
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(cboEndpoint.Text))
        {
            WriteToLog(NoEndpointsFound);
        }

        if (serviceHost == null)
        {
            try
            {
                // Find a free TCP port
                int port = FreeTcpPort();
                // Set the value of the static MainForm property
                Magic8BallWFCallback.MainForm = this;
                // Create the service host that will be used to 
                // receive the response from the WCF Workflow Service
                serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(Magic8BallWFCallback));
                if (serviceHost.Description.Endpoints.Count > 0)
                {
                    // Read the URI from the configuration file and
                    // change it to use the TCP port found at the previous step
                    Uri oldUri = serviceHost.Description.Endpoints[0].Address.Uri;
                    listenUri = new Uri(string.Format(URIFormat, oldUri.Scheme, 
                                                        oldUri.Host, port, 
                                                        oldUri.AbsolutePath));
                    serviceHost.Description.Endpoints[0].Address = new EndpointAddress(listenUri);
                    serviceHost.Open();
                    // Log the URI
                    WriteToLog(string.Format(Magic8BallWFCallbackServiceOpened, listenUri.AbsoluteUri));
                }
                else
                {
                    // Log error message
                    WriteToLog(NoValidEndpointsForMagic8BallWFCallbackServiceOpened);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // Log Exception and InnerException
                WriteToLog(ex.Message);
                WriteToLog(ex.InnerException.Message);
            }
        }
        Magic8BallWFClient proxy = null;
        try
        {
            if (serviceHost != null && serviceHost.State == CommunicationState.Opened)
            {
                // Create the client proxy to send the question to the WCF Workflow Service
                proxy = new Magic8BallWFClient(cboEndpoint.Text);
                // Create a new request message
                WFRequest request = new WFRequest();
                request.Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
                request.Question = txtQuestion.Text;
                request.Delay = delay;
                WriteToLog(string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, 
                                            RequestFormat, 
                                            cboEndpoint.Text, 
                                            request.Id, 
                                            request.Question));
                using (new OperationContextScope((IContextChannel)proxy.InnerChannel))
                {
                    // You can use the context to send pairs of keys and values, 
// stored implicitly in the message headers,
IDictionary<string, string> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>(); dictionary["MachineName"] = Environment.MachineName;
// Add the URI of the callback endpoint to the callback context // This information is used by the WCF workflow service to initialize // the callback correlation handle used to implement the Durable Duplex pattern. var context = new CallbackContextMessageProperty(listenUri, dictionary); OperationContext.Current.OutgoingMessageProperties.Add(CallbackContextMessageProperty.Name,
                                                                           context); // Invoke the WF Workflow Service WFAck ack = proxy.AskQuestion(request); if (ack != null && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(ack.Ack)) { WriteToLog(string.Format(AckFormat, ack.Id, ack.Ack)); } } } } catch (FaultException ex) { WriteToLog(ex.Message); if (proxy != null) { proxy.Abort(); } } catch (CommunicationException ex) { WriteToLog(ex.Message); if (proxy != null) { proxy.Abort(); } } catch (TimeoutException ex) { WriteToLog(ex.Message); if (proxy != null) { proxy.Abort(); } } catch (Exception ex) { WriteToLog(ex.Message); if (proxy != null) { proxy.Abort(); } } } catch (Exception ex) { WriteToLog(ex.Message); } }


In detail, the code performs the following steps:

  • Upon the dispatch of the first message, the client application creates the service host that will be used to asynchronously receive the response message from the WCF workflow service. In particular, it individuates a free TCP port, then reads the configuration of the callback service endpoint from the configuration file and finally modifies the URI of the endpoint to use the TCP port found. The WCF callback service exposed by the client application is defined by the Magic8BallWFCallback class that implements the IMagic8BallWFCallback service interface.
  • Creates a new instance of the Magic8BallWFClient proxy class.
  • Creates and initializes a new WFRequest object.
  • Uses the OperationContextScope to access the OperationContext within a scope.
  • Uses the current OperationContext and an object of type CallbackContextMessageProperty to initialize the wsc:CallbackContext message header with the URI of the callback service endpoint.
  • Invokes the WCF workflow service.

The following table reports the code of the Magic8BallWFCallback service class contained in the Client project and the code of the IMagic8BallWFCallback service interface contained in the ServiceContracts project.

namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.ServiceContracts
{
    [ServiceContract(Namespace = http://microsoft.appfabric.cat/10/samples/duplexmep/wf, 
                     ConfigurationName = "IMagic8BallWFCallback")] public interface IMagic8BallWFCallback { [OperationContract(Action = "AskQuestionResponse", IsOneWay = true)] void AskQuestionResponse(WFResponseMessage responseMessage); } } namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.Client { [ServiceBehavior] public class Magic8BallWFCallback : IMagic8BallWFCallback { #region Private Constants private const string ResponseFormat = "Response:\n\tId: {0}\n\tAnswer: {1}"; #endregion #region Private Static Fields private static MainForm form = null; #endregion #region Private Static Fields public static MainForm MainForm { get { return form; } set { form = value; } } #endregion #region IMagic8BallCallback Members [OperationBehavior] public void AskQuestionResponse(WFResponseMessage responseMessage) { if (responseMessage != null && responseMessage.Response != null && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(responseMessage.Response.Id) && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(responseMessage.Response.Answer)) { form.WriteToLog(string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, ResponseFormat, responseMessage.Response.Id, responseMessage.Response.Answer)); } } #endregion } } namespace Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.Client { public partial class MainForm : Form { ... public void WriteToLog(string message) { if (InvokeRequired) { Invoke(new Action<string>(InternalWriteToLog), new object[] { message }); } else { InternalWriteToLog(message); } } private void InternalWriteToLog(string message) { if (message != null && message != string.Empty) { string[] lines = message.Split('\n'); DateTime objNow = DateTime.Now; string space = new string(' ', 19); string line; for (int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i++) { if (i == 0) { line = string.Format(DateFormat, objNow.Hour, objNow.Minute, objNow.Second, lines[i]); lstLog.Items.Add(line); } else { lstLog.Items.Add(space + lines[i]); } } lstLog.SelectedIndex = lstLog.Items.Count - 1; } } ... } }

The AskQuestionResponse operation exposed by the callback contract validates and logs the content of the response message returned by the WCF workflow service. The following table shows the content of the configuration file of the client application.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
  <system.serviceModel>
    <bindings>
      <netTcpBinding>
        <binding name="netTcpBinding">
          <security mode="Transport">
            <transport protectionLevel="None" />
          </security>
        </binding>
      </netTcpBinding>
      <netTcpContextBinding>
        <binding name="netTcpContextBinding">
          <security mode="Transport">
            <transport protectionLevel="None" />
          </security>
        </binding>
      </netTcpContextBinding>
    </bindings>
    <services>
      <service name="Microsoft.AppFabric.CAT.Samples.DuplexMEP.Client.Magic8BallWFCallback">
        <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:15001/magic8ballwfcallback"
                  binding="netTcpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="netTcpBinding"
                  contract="IMagic8BallWFCallback"/>
      </service>
    </services>
    <client>
      <clear />
      <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost/magic8ballwf/syncmagic8ball.xamlx"
                binding="netTcpContextBinding" 
                bindingConfiguration="netTcpContextBinding"
                contract="IMagic8BallWF"
                name="NetTcpEndpointSyncWF" />
    </client>
  </system.serviceModel>
  <startup>
    <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" sku=".NETFramework,Version=v4.0"/>
  </startup>
</configuration>

As you can easily notice, the client endpoint uses the NetTcpContextBinding, whereas the callback service endpoint uses the NetTcpBinding. The context bindings were introduced in the .NET Framework 3.5 and are typically used the same way as their base bindings. However, they add support for a dedicated context management protocol. These bindings can be used with or without a context. The context protocol lets you pass as a custom context a collection of strings in the form of key-value pairs, stored implicitly in the message headers. In our context, the use of a context binding is mandatory to initialize the Durable Duplex Correlation. This brings us to the next topic.

WCF Workflow Service

WCF workflow services provide a productive environment for authoring long-running, durable operations or services. Workflow services are implemented using WF activities that can make use of WCF for sending and receiving data. Explaining in detail how to build a WCF workflow service is out of the scope of the present article. For more information on WCF workflow services, see the following articles:

In this section I will focus my attention on how the WCF workflow service implements communications with both the client application and the BizTalk orchestration. When I created the WCF Workflow Service, the initial workflow just contained a Sequence activity with a Receive activity followed by a SendReply activity as shown in the following illustration.WCFWorkflowServiceI selected the Sequential activity and I clicked the Variables button to display the corresponding editor. I created a variable for each message to exchange with the client and BizTalk application and then I created a CorrelationHandle variable to hold the callback correlation.

Variables

In order to expose a NetTcpContextBinding endpoint I configured the Receive activity as shown in the following picture:

ReceiveActivityProperties

In particular, I used the ServiceContractName property of the Receive activity to specify the target namespace and the contract interface of the service endpoint and I used the Action property to specify the action header of the request message. To initialize the callback correlation handle, I selected the Receive activity and then I clicked the ellipsis button next to the (Collection) text for the CorrelationInitializers property in the property grid for the Add Correlation Initializers dialog box to appear.

InitializeCorrelationHandle

On the left panel of the dialog, I selected the correlation handle variable previously created, and I then chose Callback correlation initializer in the combobox containing the available correlation type initializers. Before invoking the downstream BizTalk application, the WCF workflow service immediately returns an ACK message to the caller. Therefore, I configured the SendReply activity, bound to the initial Receive activity, to return a WFAck message, as shown in the picture below.

WFWorkflowFirstPart

As you can notice, the workflow uses a CustomTrackingActivity to emit a user-defined event. This pattern is used throughout the workflow. Custom tracking records generated at runtime by the WCF workflow service can be analyzed using the AppFabric Dashboard.

At this point, I had two option to invoke the WCF-NetTcp receive location exposed by the BizTalk application : the first choice was generating a custom WCF proxy activity, whereas the second alternative was using the messaging activities provided out-of-the-box by WF. In this case I opted for the first option, but in the next article I’ll show you how using the messaging activities and the Content-Based Correlation to implement an asynchronous communication between the WCF workflow service and the underlying orchestration. To create the WCF proxy activity I performed the following steps:

  • I right clicked the WorkflowServices project and I selected the Add Service Reference from the context menu.
  • As shown in the following picture, in the Add Service Reference dialog I specified the URL of the MetadataExchange endpoint exposed by the DuplexMEP.Sync.WCF-NetTcp.ReceiveLocation. Previously, I generated the service metadata endpoint using the BizTalk WCF Publishing Wizard. This has been recently extended in AppFabric Connect to provide the possibility to publish on-premise WCF receive locations to the cloud using the Windows Azure Service Bus. For more information on this topic, see “Exposing BizTalk Applications on the Cloud using AppFabric Connect for Services" on TechNet.AddServiceReference
  • Then I specified a namespace for the proxy activity and I clicked the OK button to confirm.

In general, this operation generates a custom activity for each operation exposed by the referenced service. As shown in the picture below, in my case this action created a single activity named AskQuestion to invoke the request-response WCF receive location exposed by the BizTalk application.AskQuestionActivity

The following picture depicts the central part of the SyncMagic8Ball WCF workflow service.

WFCentralPart

This section of the workflow executes the following actions:

  • Tracks a user-defined event using the CustomTrackingActivity.
  • Uses the Mapper activity to transform the WFRequest message into a BizTalkRequest message.
  • Tracks a user-defined event using the CustomTrackingActivity.
  • Invokes the WCF receive location exposed by the BizTalk application.
  • Tracks a user-defined event using the CustomTrackingActivity.
  • Uses the Mapper activity to transform the BizTalkResponse message into a WFResponse message.
  • Tracks a user-defined event using the CustomTrackingActivity.

The last part of the WCF workflow invokes the callback endpoint exposed by the client application to return the response to the initial request. In particular, the latter contains the Id of the original request, and this allows the client application to correlate the response to the corresponding request, especially when the client has multiple in-flight requests.

WFLastPart

This portion of the workflow performs just 2 steps:

  • Uses a Send activity  to send the response message to the caller. This activity is configured to use the callback handle correlation.
  • Tracks a user-defined event using the CustomTrackingActivity.

The following figure shows how I configured the Send activity used to transmit the response message back to the caller.

SendActivityProperties

As highlighted above, I assigned to the CorrelatesWith property the callback correlation handle that I previously initialized on the Receive activity. Then I properly set the other properties like OperationName, Action, and ServiceContractName to match the characteristics of the callback service endpoint exposed by the client application.

BizTalk Application

The DuplexMEP application is composed of 2 artifacts, the SyncMagic8Ball orchestration and the DuplexMEP.Sync.WCF-NetTcp.ReceiveLocation. As mentioned earlier, the orchestration is a BizTalk version of the notorious Magic 8 Ball toy: it receives a request message containing a question, waits for a configurable number of seconds and then it randomly returns one of 20 standardized answers. 

The following picture shows the receive location within the BizTalk Administration Console.

SyncWCFReceiveLocation

The following picture shows the structure of the SyncMagic8Ball orchestration.

SyncMagic8BallOrchestrationIf you are interested in more details about the DuplexMEP BizTalk application, you can read the first part of this article.

AppFabric Configuration

This section contains the steps I followed to configure the WCF workflow service in the IIS\AppFabric environment.

  • Using the IIS Manager Console, I created a web application called Magic8BallWF that points to the folder containing the project for my SyncMagic8Ball WCF workflow service.
  • Then I right-clicked the Magic8BallWF application, as shown in the picture below, I selected  Manage WCF and WF Services from the context menu and then Configure.

AppFabricConfigure

  • On the Monitoring tab of the Configure WCF and WF for Application dialog, I enabled event collection to the AppFabric Monitoring database, I selected the connection string for the monitoring database and I chose an appropriate monitoring level.

MonitoringTab

  • On the Workflow Persistence tab, I selected the SQL Server Workflow Persistence option to enable persisting service instances to the AppFabric Persistence database.

WorkflowPersistenceTab

 

Quotes_Icon Note
For data protection and performance reasons,  WCF and WF services running on the same AppFabric environment can be configured to use separate monitoring and persistence stores. This solution is particularly suitable for a multi-tenant hosted environment running several applications that are managed by different companies or different divisions within the same company. For more information on this topic, you can read the following articles:

 

  • On the Workflow Host Management  tab, I configured the runtime behavior of WF service instances. 

WorkflowHostManagement

 

Quotes_Icon Note
To manage a durable workflow service within the AppFabric runtime environment, the net.pipe binding must be configured for the website containing that application, and the net.pipe protocol must be enabled for the application. This is required because the Workflow Management Service (WMS), which works with the workflow persistence store to provide reliability and instance control, communicates with the Workflow Control standard endpoint of workflow services via the net.pipe protocol. If the net.pipe protocol is not set for a durable workflow application, when you attempt to configure the application, you will receive the following error message: “Workflow persistence is not fully functional because the net.pipe protocol is missing from the application’s list of enabled protocols.” To enable the net.pipe protocol for an application, right-click the application, point to Manage Application, and then click Advanced Settings. Add “,net.pipe” to “http” in the Enabled Protocols line (with no space between “http” and the comma), and then click OK. For more information on this topic, see "AppFabric Configuration Issues: .NET 4, net.pipe, and Role Services" on TechNet.

 

  • On the Auto-Start tab, I enabled the auto-start feature for my web application. When auto-start is enabled, hosted WF or WCF services within an application are instantiated automatically when the IIS service is started by the operating system. The services within the application will automatically start when the server is started. You can configure all services within an application to start, or a subset of services within an application. If you enable auto-start for an application, the auto-start feature will work only if you also enable auto-start for the application pool used by the application. The auto-start feature of AppFabric is built on top of the auto-start feature of Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.5, which is included in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. In IIS, you can configure an application pool and all or some of its applications to automatically start when the IIS service starts. The AppFabric auto-start feature extends this functionality so that you can configure all or some of the services within an application to automatically start when the application starts.

    For more information on this topic, see the following articles:

AutoStartTab

ThrottlingTab

 

Quotes_Icon Note 
The default values for the properties MaxConcurrentCalls, MaxConcurrentInstances, MaxConcurrentSessions exposed by the ServiceThrottlingBehavior have been increased and made more dynamic as they are based on the number of processors seen by Windows.

Property .NET 4.0 Default Previous Default
MaxConcurrentCalls 16 * ProcessorCount 16
MaxConcurrentInstances 116 * ProcessorCount 26
MaxConcurrentSessions 100 * ProcessorCount 10

For more information on this topic, see “Less tweaking of your WCF 4.0 apps for high throughput workloads” post on the AppFabric CAT blog.

 

  • Finally I pressed the OK button to confirm settings.

Then, I opened the Services page, I right-clicked the SyncMagic8Ball and I selected Configure from the context menu. On the Monitoring tab, I clicked the Configure button on the right panel and selected the Troubleshooting Tracking Profile. This tracking profile is quite verbose and therefore is particularly helpful when debugging a WF service in testing environment, but it is not recommended in a production, unless you have to investigate and troubleshoot a problem.

ServiceMonitoring

 

The following table contains the configuration file of the WCF workflow service after completing these steps.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <system.web>
    <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" />
  </system.web>
  <system.serviceModel>
    <bindings>
      <netTcpBinding>
        <binding name="netTcpBinding">
          <security mode="Transport">
            <transport protectionLevel="None" />
          </security>
        </binding>
      </netTcpBinding>
      <netTcpContextBinding>
        <binding name="netTcpContextBinding">
          <security mode="Transport">
            <transport protectionLevel="None" />
          </security>
        </binding>
      </netTcpContextBinding>
    </bindings>
    <client>
      <!-- This client endpoint is used by the WCF workflow service
           to incoke the WCF receive location exposed by the BizTalk -->
      <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:7171/Magic8BallBizTalk/Sync"
                binding="netTcpBinding"
                bindingConfiguration="netTcpBinding"
                contract="Magic8Ball"
                name="bizTalkSyncNetTcpBinding"/>
    </client>
    <services>
      <service name="SyncMagic8Ball">
        <endpoint address="" 
                  binding="basicHttpContextBinding" 
                  contract="IMagic8BallWF" 
                  name="basicHttpBinding_SyncMagic8Ball" />
        <endpoint address="" 
                  binding="netTcpContextBinding" 
                  bindingConfiguration="netTcpContextBinding" 
                  contract="IMagic8BallWF" 
                  name="netTcpBinding_SyncMagic8Ball" />
      </service>
    </services>
    <behaviors>
      <serviceBehaviors>
        <behavior>
          <!-- To avoid disclosing metadata information, set 
               the value below to false and remove the metadata 
               endpoint above before deployment -->
          <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true" />
          <!-- To receive exception details in faults for debugging purposes, 
               set the value below to true. Set to false before deployment to 
               avoid disclosing exception information -->
          <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" />
          <!-- Added by AppFabric Admin Console -->
          <workflowInstanceManagement authorizedWindowsGroup="AS_Administrators" />
          <workflowUnhandledException action="AbandonAndSuspend" />
          <workflowIdle timeToPersist="00:01:00" timeToUnload="00:01:00" />
          <serviceThrottling maxConcurrentCalls="200" maxConcurrentSessions="200" maxConcurrentInstances="200" />
          <etwTracking profileName="Troubleshooting Tracking Profile" />
        </behavior>
      </serviceBehaviors>
    </behaviors>
    <serviceHostingEnvironment multipleSiteBindingsEnabled="true" />
  </system.serviceModel>
  <system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true" />
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

 

It’s probably worth noting that you can manually modifies the configuration file without using the administration extensions provided by AppFabric. However, AppFabric offers a convenient and handy way to accomplish this task. 

Testing the Application

To test the application, you can proceed as follows:

  • Makes sure to start the DuplexMEP BizTalk application.
  • Open a new instance of the Client Application, as indicated in the picture below.
  • Enter an existential question like "Why am I here?", "What's the meaning of like?" or "Will the world end in 2012?" in the Question textbox.
  • Select one of NetTcpEndpointSyncWF in the Endpoint drop down list.
  • Specify a Delay in seconds in the corresponding textbox.
  • Press the Ask button.

SyncMagic8BallClient

Now, if you press the Ask button multiple times in a row, you can easily notice that the client application is called back by the WCF workflow service in an asynchronous way. Therefore, the client application doesn't need to wait for the response to the previous question before posing a new request.

Make some calls and then open the AppFabric Dashboard. This page is composed of three detailed metrics sections: three detailed metrics sections: Persisted WF Instances, WCF Call History, and WF Instance History. These sections display monitoring and tracking metrics for instances of .NET Framework 4 WCF and WF services. Let’s focus our attention on the WF Instance History section, highlighted in red in the figure below. The latter displays historical statistics derived from tracked workflow instance events stored in one or more Monitoring databases. It can draw data from several monitoring databases, if the server or farm uses more than one monitoring database for services deployed at the selected scope.AppFabricDashboardHighlighted

If you click the Completions link you can review WF instances that completed in the selected period of time. You can use the Query control on the Tracked WF Instances Page to run a simple query and restrict the number of rows displayed in the grid below.

TrackedWFInstances

Finally, you can right-click one of the completed WF instances and select View Tracked Events to access the Tracked Events Page where you can examine events generated by WCF and WF services. Here, you can group events by Event Type, as shown in the figure below, and analyze the user-defined events emitted by the current WCF instance using the CustomTrackingActivity that we saw at the beginning of this article.

TrackedUserDefinedEvents

In particular, you can quickly investigate the details of a selected event in the Details pane, as highlighted in red in the figure above.

Conclusions

In this article we have seen how to exchange messages with a WCF workflow service running in IIS\AppFabric using the Durable Duplex Correlation and a context binding. We have also seen how to create a custom activity to emit user-defined events and how to to use the using the AppFabric Dashboard to monitor custom tracking events generated by WF services. Finally we have seen how the Mapper activity provided by AppFabric Connect to implement message transformations in a WCF workflow service. This component not only allows to implement message transformations in a easy way in any WF project, but it allows developers to reuse maps from existing BizTalk application in an AppFabric solution. In the final part of this article, we’ll see how to implement an asynchronous communication between a WCF Workflow Service and an Orchestration using WS-Addressing and Content-Based Correlation. In the meantime, here you can download the companion code for this article. As always, your feedbacks are more than welcome!