March, 2009 - Microsoft PixelSense Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
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  • Microsoft PixelSense Blog

    Resources for Surface WPF Development

    • 1 Comments

    In his blog post, Kevin Kennedy talked about how WPF became the primary platform for Surface development. As a follow up to that, I thought it might be good to mention some resources you can use to get started learning WPF programming. This is by no means a comprehensive list, nor is it intended as an endorsement, but here are some resources to consider as you embark on becoming a Microsoft Surface developer.

    Web Resources
    Books
    • Sams Teach Yourself WPF in 24 Hours by Rob Eisenberg and Christopher Bennage
    • Programming WPF, by Chris Sells and Ian Griffiths
    • Essential Windows Presentation Foundation, by Chris Anderson
    • Pro WPF in C# 2008: Windows Presentation Foundation with .NET 3.5, Second Edition, by Matthew MacDonald
    • Applications = Code + Markup: A Guide to the Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (Pro - Developer), by Charles Petzold
    • Windows Presentation Foundation Unleashed, by Adam Nathan
    Training
    Tools
    • Snoop is a utility to aid in visually debugging Microsoft Window Presentation Foundation (WPF) applications. It provides a visual tree view of WPF elements along with the properties and a list of events that have occurred on those elements.
    • Performance Profiling Tools for WPF - WPF provides a suite of performance profiling tools that allow you to analyze the run-time behavior of your application and determine the types of performance optimizations you can apply.
    • Windows Presentation Foundation Tools and Controls - Mike Swanson's Blog

    There are, of course, many more resources out there but this should give you some good places to get started. If you have other WPF learning options you’d like to share, please mention them in the comments. Thanks! - Mark

  • Microsoft PixelSense Blog

    Multitouch and Surface Computing workshop

    • 1 Comments

    This Saturday (April 4, 2009), Dennis Wixon and yours truly (along with three researchers from Finland--Giulio Jacucci and Ann Morrison--and Canada--Scott MacKenzie) will be co-hosting a workshop at the annual SIG-CHI conference in Boston. The conference brings together a few thousand international academic researchers, practitioners, and students, and features some of the latest thinking and application around human-computer interaction.

    The workshop that we are hosting, named Multitouch and Surface Computing, brings in both seasoned and fledgling researchers representing both the private and public sector from several countries. Browse through the attached program and you will discover that some of the brightest, including three of our own—Celine Aston-Smith, Jennifer McCormick, and Daniel Wigdor—will be present.

    Through this site, Dennis and I will try our best to share some of the cutting-edge human-computer interaction science, theories, debates, etc. around multitouch. Stay tuned!!!

  • Microsoft PixelSense Blog

    School in the UK shows us Microsoft Surface in the classroom

    • 6 Comments

    Microsoft Surface and education are like peanut butter and jelly. Microsoft Surface is like that with a number of markets, but there's something about kids interacting with a computer in a very accessible way that seems right. Microsoft worked with Infusion and RM (who also worked with Lightbox Education) to create applications for schools. The video below is a video case study of what happened when they dropped it off for a day with teachers and students. You'll also see some of the Microsoft applications (puzzles) and VectorForm (Surface DJ) featured in the video below. You can also see more education concepts that we've covered in the past with nsquared. Both were at BETT with Microsoft Surface.

    As a BONUS, here's an excellent video created by DPE UK which goes in depth about the development of the Finguistics application with RM and Infusion. This doesn't just relate to education, but more broadly to the development of Microsoft Surface applications as I've covered in the past (1)(2)(3).

    What do you think?

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March, 2009