Filing Bugs

Filing Bugs

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With the release of RC1 of PowerShell, we've closed down on doing much feature work and are primarily polishing the product. This means fixing bugs, cleaning up usability issues, and really making sure this is a quality product.

For those of you unfamiliar with Microsoft's milestone naming terminology, RC1 stands for Release Candidate 1. This means that PowerShell has reached a point where it has enough of both features and reliability to be compelling and usable as a standalone product.

So what does that mean for you, dear PowerShell user? It means that the team is now 100% focused on polishing and eliminating bugs. We do a great deal of testing on our own (over 100,000 individual tests currently!) as well as obviously using PowerShell extensively day to day. However, we know we won't catch every bug or issue.

We need your help to make sure PowerShell isn't just a great product, but a fantastic product! If you run into any behavior that is a bug or a usability issue, such as the shell crashing, behaving as you wouldn't expect, or you just find a small typo in the documentation somewhere, let us know!

I've set up a bug reporting area on MS Connect for you to submit your bugs, as well as voting on issues that others have found as well as search for workarounds and resolutions to your issues. These bugs are sent directly to the team, and every one is looked at.

If you haven't used the Monad Connect site before you'll need to do a quick registration if you haven't visited Connect before.

 

How to register for the MS Connect site:

  1. Visit http://connect.microsoft.com/
  2. Click on "Available Programs" on the left and sign in with your Microsoft Passport credentials.
  3. Click "Apply" next to the the item "Windows PowerShell"
  4. Click the "Submit Feedback" link on the left navigation bar to submit new bugs and suggestions.
  5. Click the "Feedback" link on the left navigation bar to track your submitted bugs and suggestions, as well as view, vote, and comment on bugs and suggestions submitted by others.

If you are already subscribed to the Monad Connect site:

  1. Click on "My Participation" and sign in with your Microsoft Passport credentials.
  2. Click "Windows PowerShell"
  3. Click the "Submit Feedback" link on the left navigation bar to submit new bugs and suggestions.
  4. Click the "Feedback" link on the left navigation bar to track your submitted bugs and suggestions, as well as view, vote, and comment on bugs and suggestions submitted by others.

I'm looking forward to seeing your feedback! If you have any issues with the site, please do let me know. You can always shoot me an e-mail at lchung@microsoft.com.

Leonard Chung [MSFT]
Windows PowerShell Program Manager

PSMDTAG:FAQ: How do I file a bug or feature request?

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  • This RC1 and Beta terminology microsoft uses always seemed odd to me. When most software companies I'm familiar with release a beta, that means the feature set is locked. Only bugs will be fixed. And RC meant release candidate. Meaning if there were no blockers in the RC build, it'd be relabeled as the official GM release.

    Did MS ever use these naming conventions or have they always used beta to mean what alpha means for other companies (ie, not feature complete)?
  • "This RC1 and Beta terminology microsoft uses always seemed odd to me. When most software companies I'm familiar with release a beta, that means the feature set is locked. Only bugs will be fixed. And RC meant release candidate. Meaning if there were no blockers in the RC build, it'd be relabeled as the official GM release."

    This is correct -- we use the same terminology. To be clear, PowerShell RC1 is feature complete. However, Beta 3.1 was not feature complete.

    This may be an issue of semantics. I've seen many other companies view alphas as internal development, betas as public pre-release with locked feature sets, and then go straight to RTM with no RC. For PowerShell we've always aimed to have strong shell itself is strongly linked to the quality of the cmdlets, scripts, and providers others community participation as, after all, the build on top of it. Thus, we've had PDC builds, beta builds, and finally RC builds -- all of which have been publically available.
  • Well, here's a bug: in the program list it's called "Monad" instead of PowerShell...
  • What to learn about Windows PowerShell without installing it? Download our Windows PowerShell 1.0 Documentation

  • Hi, thanks for a great product.  I love it, especially the ability to instantiate and use .NET classes just like that.  The Getting Started and Primer guides are great too.  But I still can't find any reference manual.  Surely you don't expect the whole world to pick up Windows PowerShell by looking at examples.  I am struggling right now.  What is the syntax for a function?  How are arguments to functions passed?  From a sample somewhere I gather that a function can return many objects.  How do you explain that?  Are functions typed?  I had to waste some time to figure out that the comment character is a #, and I haven't found out how to comment a block.  How do I do INCLUDE statements?  I can't hold myself back to convert my thousands of lines in many WSF and VBS files.  But I will get nowhere without the documentation.  Can you let me know where this gem ia hidden.  I must be missing something despite searching for a week.  Thank you.

  • Test-Path: We Goofed! (also known as a documentation errata…) Test-Path is a very handy little cmdlet.

  • Test-Path: We Goofed! (also known as a documentation errata…) Test-Path is a very handy little cmdlet.

  • Test-Path: We Goofed! (also known as a documentation errata…) Test-Path is a very handy little cmdlet.

  • Test-Path: We Goofed! (also known as a documentation errata…) Test-Path is a very handy little cmdlet.

  • These instructions do not work if you were previous in the connect programme for Powershell and you deleted you membership when the product shipped.

    I can now not add myself back to the powershell connect programme as it is not listed for me.

    So how do I file bugs?

    :J

  • Connect.Microsoft.com appears to be unavailable at connectbeta.microsoft.com does not include PowerShell at this time.

  • It should be available now on http://connect.microsoft.com, once you sign-in with your Microsoft Passport credentials.

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