Microsoft Project 2010
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  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Using Project to Create Meeting Agendas

    • 4 Comments

    *** Update on 4/5 - I attached the project file that I used for this blog post to help you get started on your meeting agenda. It is available at the bottom of this post.

    If you think about it, meetings are a lot like projects. They’re for a defined amount of time with the goal of getting something accomplished. All good meetings have a defined agenda just like all good projects have a detailed schedule. Since you can use Project to create schedules, why not use Project to create your agendas?

    Now this is probably overkill for your one hour meeting where the agenda is three bullet points but if you are trying to plan a multi-hour meeting where a variety of speakers have to present and you need to stick to a timeframe – Project can definitely help.

    I recently had to plan a meeting that had some complexity and using Project saved me time. I knew that we had four hours available and had to get in seven presentations plus an intro and conclusion. I started by just dividing the time out and giving everyone the same amount of time but then all the speakers were saying they needed extra time or didn’t need that much time. If I had been in Excel or Word I would have had to manually update all the time slots and then constantly be checking to make sure everything still fit. Since I was in Project, I could make use of links and deadlines to automate this. This was especially handy after I made what I thought was the final schedule and someone pointed out I should probably add some breaks seeing how it was a four hour meeting – whoops.

    The below timeline is the final result of my planning and made for a great agenda graphic in my meeting request:

    image

    How did I do this:

    1. Create a new project.
    2. Go to the Project tab – Project Information and set the project start date to the exact date and time of the meeting. Ex. 3/23/11 1:00 PM.
      1. If your meeting goes over lunch or outside normal working hours, also make sure to set the Project Calendar to the 24 hour calendar so it doesn’t affect your agenda.
    3. Go to File tab – Options.
      1. On the General tab, set the date format to HH:MM
      2. On the Duration tab, set Duration is entered in Minutes (or Hours if that works better for you)
    4. Now add your agenda items in the order you’ll be presenting. Feel free to use summary tasks to help organize the topics – I did.
    5. Select the last meeting item and go to the Task Information dialog – Advanced tab. Set the deadline to be the meeting end time. This way you’ll get an indication if you go over time.
    6. Now link all of the tasks by selecting them and clicking Link Tasks on the Task tab.
    7. You can now start playing with different durations to build a meeting agenda that will work. Don’t forget breaks!
    8. When you are done, you can create an agenda timeline by right-clicking the tasks and selecting Add to Timeline.

    Here’s the actual schedule that I created:

    image

    Happy meeting planning!

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Next Project Conference – March 19-22, 2012

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    Microsoft Project Conference 2012 will be held in Phoenix, Arizona on March 19 - 22, 2012.

    • Registration will open May 2011

    • Sponsorship & Expo information will be announced in May 2011

    • Add yourself to the keep me notified list at www.msprojectconference.com

    Project Conference is the premiere Microsoft-led event to share Project and Portfolio Management best practices and connect with your peers from around the globe. Join customers, partners, industry-leading experts and the Microsoft Project team to learn about their success with Microsoft Project and how you can take your success to the next level.

    Stay connected for future announcements on Conference Registration, Call for Content , Sponsorship Opportunities and Agenda. Add yourself to the Keep Me Notified list at www.msprojectconference.com.

    We look forward to seeing you in Phoenix next March!

    Project Conference 2012 Team | projconf@microsoft.com

    * On a side note, the average weather for Phoenix in March is 70F/21C  and Sunny!

     

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project 2010 Help Content – Now Available for Download

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    You can now download a bunch of help content around Getting Started with Project 2010. This content includes a guide to the ribbon, information on what’s new in 2010, and a PowerPoint you can use for training people on 2010:

    • Basic tasks in Project 2010.html
    • Getting_Started_with_Project2010.wmv
    • Project2010Guide.exe
    • Reference_Project_2007_to_2010.xltx
    • Training Presentation - Getting started with Project 2010.pptx
    • What's new in Project 2010.html

    Link to download location - http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d05156e8-3ee5-4735-a45a-b4372f12abdb

    Additionally, you can find that help content and much more posted here - http://office2010.microsoft.com/en-us/project-help

    As always, let us know if you have any feedback on the content or have requests for future help articles.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    New Feature Pack from Visual Studio Improves Project Management and Software Development Team Collaboration

    • 4 Comments

    *** Update *** June 28th, 2011 – Please note the following resources are now available:

    We are excited to announce the release of the Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack which further strengthens Microsoft’s Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) Solution. The integration between Project Server and Team Foundation Server is a considerable advancement for organizations that want to bridge the collaboration gap between the Project Management Office and software development teams. The Feature Pack will enable teams to work together more effectively by:

    • Providing up to date insight into portfolio execution, alignment with strategic objectives, and resource utilization of software development projects by leveraging the quantitative data stored in different systems.
    • Automating the exchange and sharing of project information across teams and improving coordination between teams using disparate methodologies, like waterfall and agile, via common data and agreed upon metrics.
    • Enabling development and project management teams to collaborate and communicate project timeline and progress using familiar tools such as Microsoft Visual Studio, Project, and SharePoint.

    Our Microsoft IT team has been using the Feature Pack internally for a while. As in many organizations, the software development teams and the project management teams weren’t collaborating as effectively as they could. Tools, even methodologies, were different and didn’t talk to each other. Now after implementing the Feature Pack, developers don’t have to spend time getting status updates, there is much better schedule alignment between teams and there is better visibility and clarity overall!

    "By sharing data more efficiently, the team was able to reduce weekly time spent in status meetings to two hours from 20 hours. Now developers and project managers can focus on their work instead of spending hours each week in status report meetings, and managers can make better, data-driven decisions. In addition, managers and developers have streamlined access to information they need and have better insight into the entire ALM process.” - Michael Lucas, Senior Program Management Lead in Microsoft IT at Microsoft

    One of our partners in Brazil that has the Microsoft ALM competency, TechResult, has also deployed the Feature Pack with the following the results:

    “Team Foundation Server provides visibility and traceability all over my Project. Project Server provides governance across my organization. By integrating them I can extract the best from an ALM platform.” - Daniel Franco Abrahão de Oliveira, ALM Team Manager, at TechResult

    Now, you can download the Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack from MSDN download center. We will continue publishing additional resources in the coming weeks, such as a demo Virtual Machine with a presenter script, additional case studies, and more- so stay tuned and we’ll let you know via this blog when they are available! Below are some of the key resources available now:

    I urge you to take a look at connecting your software development and project management teams with today’s release.

    Questions and Answers

    Q. Is there a demo virtual machine (VM) with this feature pack and sample data I can use?
    A. We are working on a demo VM that will include the RTM version of the feature pack (along with all the pre-requisites) that will showcase the integration between Project Server 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010; this VM will includes detailed demo scripts. Expect a release around the April 2011 timeframe. Until then you can use the CTP demo VM released last July 2010.

    Q. How does this Feature Pack differ from the out-of-the-box Team Foundation Server and Microsoft Project add-in?
    A. The Microsoft Project add-in allows project managers to use Microsoft Project to connect to Team Foundation Server to collaborate and participate in the planning and execution of software development projects. The Feature Pack enables integration between Team Foundation Server and Project Server and allows planning and status information to be synchronized between the two systems. Please read this article Operational Differences in Managing Projects Using Team Foundation and Project for more information.

    Q. Are there any prerequisites or dependencies for this Feature Pack?
    A. Dependencies are:

    For a detailed description of dependencies and prerequisites please check this MSDN article: System and Setup Requirements to Support Integration of Team Foundation Server and Project Server. Please check out Brian Harry’s post for additional information: VS/TFS 2010 SP1 and TFS-Project Server Integration Feature Pack have Released

    Q. What MSDN Subscription level is required to download the Feature Pack?
    A. This Feature Pack will only be available to Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN subscribers (go to your MSDN download center, you should find the Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack as an available download). An organization must own at least one license of Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN.

    Christophe Fiessinger
    Senior Technical Product Manager, Microsoft Project
    Blog | Twitter

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project 2010 Service Pack Update

    • 18 Comments

    Some of you may have seen the recent Office blog post from the Microsoft Office sustained engineering team.  In that post, the Office and SharePoint teams disclosed that Service Pack 1 (SP1) will include some minor updates and should be expected in the usual time frame of 12 to 18 months after the products launched.

    I wanted to let readers of this blog know that Project 2010 SP1 will also be a part of the same Service Pack.  In addition to some minor updates, SP1 will contain a rollup of the updates we post every two months here.  Our guidance is the same as the Office and SharePoint teams, those customers thinking of deploying Project 2010 should not wait for SP1 and should deploy now and see all the great benefits that customers like Marquette University and Amdocs are seeing.  You can see even more Project 2010 case studies here.

    To get you started on Project 2010, check out the Project Server home page.

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Microsoft Project
    http://blogs.msdn.com/arpans

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    CapGemini Posts Review of Project 2010

    • 1 Comments

    I want to take the opportunity to point you to a review of Project Server 2010 from CapGemini - a strong global partner building a strong Project 2010 practice.  The review is very thorough and, best of all, is available as a free download from CapGemini.  The Microsoft EPM 2010 Functional Review gives a great overview of the latest features and functionality in Project Server 2010.  A few excerpts from the report below:

    We believe that the portfolio management process incorporated in EPM 2010 is really a best-in-class solution . . .

    We find reporting in EPM/SharePoint 2010 very powerful and considerably easier than in many other PPM platforms, including . . . CA Clarity.

    The breadth and strength of the Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform give the Microsoft EPM platform its greatest competitive advantage.  No other PPM product supports the range of solutions that the Microsoft EPM platform can support.

    A couple of weeks ago, I also blogged about our recent placement as Leader in IDC’s most recent MarketScapes on Enterprise IT PPM and Application Lifecycle Management views here.

    I encourage you to give these reports a read!

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Microsoft Project

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project Web App Help content on TechNet

    • 1 Comments

    imageThe Project Web App Help content, available on Office.com, is now also available on TechNet.

    While the Help system within Project Web App continues to point to Office.com, this content has been made available on TechNet for those who may have an easier time browsing through content in the TechNet Library.

    This content is also available in a downloadable CHM file that contains all Project Server 2010 technical library content on TechNet.


    Want to provide feedback?

    We would love to hear your feedback on this content. To provide feedback on TechNet articles, first determine which view you are using: Classic, Lightweight, or ScriptFree.

    image

    If you are using the Classic view, in the bar just above the article, you can use a five-star rating system. When you click to provide a star rating, a box appears where you can type in comments specific to the current article.

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    If you are using the Lightweight view, scroll to the bottom of the article and click Feedback. From there, you can type comments specific to the article you are viewing.

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    If you are using the ScriptFree view, click Feedback in the top-right portion of the article. This takes you to the MSDN, TechNet, and Expression Library Feedback Forum, where you can provide feedback on the script-free version of an article.

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    You are also welcome send feedback directly to our writing team at projdocs@microsoft.com.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Microsoft is a Leader in Enterprise IT PPM and ALM

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    IDC’s most recent MarketScape positions Microsoft as a leader in the Enterprise IT PPM and Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) views. You can download an excerpt taken from the “IT Project and Portfolio Management 2010 Vendor Analysis – Four Views to Enable Effective Evaluation” from IDC MarketScape Excerpt: IT Project and Portfolio Management 2010 Vendor Analysis – Four Views to Enable Effective Evaluation


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    The other two views in the report were the SaaS and Financial Market views in which Microsoft placed as a contender and major player respectively.

    A few things worth calling out from the report:

    • Microsoft integration with Visual Studio 2010 and evolution of portfolio management solution along with usability features such as the ribbon UI, “position [Microsoft] better for enterprise IT PPM. . .” and “make Microsoft Project more accessible to a broader base.”
    • The report says for IT PPM/ALM, “Microsoft ranks in the leader segment, with excellent capabilities as a result of its close coordination between Visual Studio 2010, Microsoft Project Server 2010, the combined collaboration capabilities with SharePoint 2010, and emerging agile support.”

    Beyond our leadership position, it’s also good to see that we’ve been recognized for year-over-year growth indicated by the (+) compared to many of the other leading vendors that are shown as declining (-). This is consistent with the positive news and momentum we’re hearing from our customer and partner communities with respect to the adoption of Microsoft Project 2010.

    So if you’re looking to replace, upgrade or deploy a new PPM solution for your organization today, I recommend taking a look at Microsoft Project 2010!

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Project

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Handling Changes to the Project Start Date

    • 7 Comments

    How often are you told that your project will start on date x and then it is moved to date y, maybe date z before it finally gets going?

    Now when your project start date moves, you can just update the start date in the Project Information dialog and a lot of dates will update but not all of them (ex. deadlines, constraints, tasks with actual work). If you want those to move you need to go through Move Project.

    image

    The advantage of Move Project is that everything in the project is moved with respect to its original offset from the project start date. For example, in this project task b has a deadline 5 days into the project and task c has a constraint to start 2 days after the project’s start date.

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    Now I select Move Project to update the project start date to 1/12/11.

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    And everything in the updated plan has the same offset as it had before. Task b has a deadline 5 days into the project and task c has a constraint to start 2 days after the project’s start date.

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    In Project 2007 and earlier, you can access this functionality on the Analysis toolbar, Adjust Dates but there are a few limitations: deadlines and tasks with non-zero percent complete aren’t moved.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Help! Where’s the Help?

    • 2 Comments

    OK. I’ll admit it. Sometimes documentation for Project and Project Server isn’t always easy to locate. It tends to be spread out. And sometimes it can be difficult to determine if the Help documentation you’re reading is from an official site. Worse, some URL’s have changed, and some new locations have been created. Let me help you set the URLs (and your Favorites list) correctly.

    Official Project Help sites

    Product information From this site you can try and buy Project, reach our partner and user communities, compare Project versions, learn tips and tricks, learn from modules and exercises, and see Project in action with demos, customer success videos and stories.
    Project desktop Help on Office Online Office Online contains Help for primarily the end user of Project and Office applications. Find Help articles, tutorials, and videos on basic Project functionality.
    Project Web Access Help on Office Online Help for Project Web Access end users can be found on Office Online. Help for Project Server administrators, however, is on TechNet.
    Project Server Help on TechNet TechNet is geared toward administrators of Project and Project Server.  Find technical articles on evaluating, planning, and deploying Project Server and other EPM solutions across your organization.  You can also explore troubleshoot resources and download the latest updates.
    Project Developer Help on MSDN MSDN is for the Project and Project Server developer, as well as for all products that Microsoft supports.
    Project forums: for IT Professionals
    and for
    end users.
    There are two official Microsoft forum sites where you can have your questions answered by power users and Project MVPs: TechNet forums for IT Professionals and Answers forums for end users.
    Tip   Make sure you set up e-mail alerts when you use these forums, so that you don’t miss any answers to your questions.
    Project blog That’s what you’re reading, in case you weren’t sure if this page is “official.” Scroll down a bit to find additional blogging sites that Project users depend upon.
    Project Videos on Office Online
    and the Project Channel on
    Microsoft Showcase
    Sometimes videos are the best way to get a point across. Project was a wide selection.
    Project Events and Webcasts Attend a World-Wide Project event, or view Project webcasts on TechNet and MSDN.

     

    Less official (but useful) sources of Project information

    Here are a few other places that have proven useful, even essential, for Project and project management.

    Blogs

    Here are a few more blogs that should be an important part of your Project support:  

         Latest EPM News 
        
    Project Programmability   
        
    Project Support blog 
        
    EPM Content Publishing News 
        
    Dedicated to Project Partners
         MPUG Blog
         Microsoft Project Official MVP site 

    Facebook There are a number of Facebook sites devoted to Project and project management. Here are a few:

         Project product page 
         Project management page 
         PMI page
    YouTube YouTube has thousands of videos devoted to Project functionality.
    Slideshare.net Use SlideShare to download useful Project reference guides and project management presentations.
    LinkedIn The Project Users Group on LinkedIn is useful for networking with other project management professionals.

    If you have other useful sites, let us know with a comment.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    New Project Server 2010 content

    • 0 Comments

    Customer requests fueled two new documentation resources for Project Server 2010! These resources just went live at the end December. If you have feedback on either of these resources, feel free to leave comments here, or send email to projdocs@microsoft.com.

    Article: Archive a completed project

    This article details the standard method for archiving completed projects, as performed by a project manager and administrator. It also provides a high-level look at some alternate archiving methods, as well as some best practices for long-term archival.

    Diagram: Tracking time and task progress in Project Server 2010

    This Visio file contains diagrams that illustrate five different timesheet and task progress workflow scenarios.

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    Standard (Single Entry Mode).  This diagram illustrates the workflow involved with reporting time and task progress if your organization reports on both of these in one view.

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    Standard (Separate Views).  This diagram illustrates the workflow involved with reporting time in the Timesheet view, and task progress in the Tasks view.

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    Timesheet Delegation.  This diagram illustrates the workflow involved when a resource identifies a delegate to report time and task progress on his or her behalf.

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    Closed-Period Updating.  This diagram illustrates the workflow involved when a resource needs to make a change to a timesheet for a time period that the administrator has already closed to updates.

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    Closed-Task Updating.  This diagram illustrates the workflow involved when a resource needs to make a change to task progress that was reported for a task that the project manager has closed to updates.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project 2010: Creating New Views

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    In Project 2010, we’ve simplified the view creation process down to two steps.

    Step 1: Update your current view to something that you want to save. In this example, I’ve inserted a few columns and applied a group to the Task Usage view.

    image

    Step 2: On the View tab, from any of the view dropdowns, click Save View.

     image  

    A dialog will pop up and you will be able to give your view a name.

    image

    And once you click OK – your new view is now being displayed and will show up in the view dropdown list.

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    So, what’s going on behind the scenes?

    A view consists of four elements– a screen, table, group, and filter. The screen is just the type of view (Gantt Chart, Task Usage, Calendar, etc.). The table defines which columns should be displayed. The filter and group settings also define what the view should show and how it should be displayed. All views have these defined, they just may be All Tasks and No Group. You can update the Table, Filter, and Group for a view through the View tab – Data group.

    When you click Save View, in the background Project is copying the current view settings to the new view and creating a copy of the current table with the new view’s name. This way as you farther insert/remove columns in your new view, other views aren’t being affected since different views can have the same table. Project doesn’t create new filters or groups when you save a new view, instead the existing ones are just applied to the new view.

    Another change for Project 2010 is that when you create a new view, table, filter, or group it is automatically added to your global.mpt file. This means that it will be available in all of your projects instead of just the current project you are in. If you don’t like this functionality, you can turn this off on the Advanced tab of the Project Options dialog. Also, note that you’ll still have to manually add items to the enterprise global just like in previous versions.

    Another advantage of having items saved to the global, besides that they’ll be available in all of your projects, is that you can go back to the global copy if you no longer want your local version. For example, in the first image in this article, notice how I’m in the task usage view but it is no longer the original task usage view I started out with – I’ve changed the columns and applied a grouping. If I want to go back to that original task usage view, on the View tab, Task Usage dropdown, I can select Reset to Default:

    image 

    Click Yes at the Warning.

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    And then I’ll be back to the plain Task Usage view.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Additionally, say I started with the view I just created, My Awesome New View, and made a bunch of changes to the formatting and such that I no longer wanted. I could click Reset to Default and get back to the original configuration I had when I first saved the view.

    Finally if I’m in the new view, My Awesome New View, and click Save View again, this time I’ll get the following dialog:

    image

    And now I can choose to update the global version of My Awesome New View or save the updates as a completely new view.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project Momentum 2010 EMEA

    • 2 Comments

    Last month, the Project team hosted Project Momentum 2010 EMEA in Barcelona, Spain – a 2-day event focused on our Europe, Middle East and Africa customers and partners. It was a great opportunity for us to learn from the Project community as well as an opportunity for the community to share best practices with each other. Thank you to everyone who participated and made this event a tremendous success!

    With over 240+ partners and customers from 28+ different countries, we had a very diverse audience! While it’s just a small part of our worldwide 20 million user Project community, it provides a unique and intimate environment for learning. I personally had the opportunity to connect with many different people through sessions, networking events and side-meetings. Truth be told, it’s what I learn from our customers and partners that makes these events so special. It was especially nice hearing about how customers & partners are deploying Project 2010 in their organizations and gaining business value today and not waiting for SP1. It’s great to hear since the team put in a lot of effort to make sure Project 2010 is a high quality release. Some examples of customers who talked about their Project 2010 experiences at Momentum include Volvo (session, written case study), NATO (session) and Kudelski (session).

    For those of you who weren’t able to make it to the conference or for those of you looking to share content with your teams, I recommend taking a look at some of the conference content here. I recommend starting with the keynote below (from the 5:05 mark after the conference welcome) that I had the honor to kick-off followed by Ludovic Hauduc, General Manager of the Project engineering team, who did a great job providing his personal insight into the Project 2010 release.

    I especially recommend watching the keynote demos at around the 43:10 mark. Eric Zenz, a Senior Program Manager Lead on Ludo’s team, does three great live demos:

    • Office 365 and Project Professional 2010 demo that highlights SharePoint Online tasks sync with Project Professional 2010 
    • Exchange Server and Project Server 2010 demo that highlights  how users can view, create, and update tasks in OWA/Outlook and “round trip” to Project Server 2010.
    • PerformancePoint Services demo that highlights the rich Business Intelligence capabilities in Project Server 2010 illustrating the out-of-the-box decomposition tree capability.


    Get Microsoft Silverlight

    Enjoy the content and thank you once again! Also look out for an announcement in early 2011 that gives more information on the next Project Conference!

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Project
    Microsoft Corporation
    http://blogs.msdn.com/arpans

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Announcing Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack Beta

    • 5 Comments

    We are excited to announce the release of the Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack Beta to Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN subscribers.

    Integration between Project Server and Team Foundation Server is a huge leap forward for organizations that want to bridge the gap between the Project Management Office and software development teams using Team Foundation Server. The feature pack further strengthens Microsoft’s Application Lifecycle Management Solution by enabling these teams to work together more effectively while not getting distracted or overwhelmed by each other’s’ detail. It enables teams to work together more effectively by:

    • Providing executives with insight into portfolio execution, alignment with strategic objectives, and resource utilization of their software development projects by leveraging the quantitative data stored in different systems.
    • Bridging the impedance mismatch between the Project Management Office and Application Development by facilitating better coordination between teams using disparate methodologies, like waterfall and agile, via common information and agreed upon metrics.
    • Enabling development and project management teams to use familiar tools to collaborate and communicate project timeline and progress such as Microsoft Project, Project Server, SharePoint and Visual Studio.

    Please check out Brian Harry’s post: Portfolio Management: TFS <-> Project Server Integration in Beta for more details on this exciting new solution and try it yourselves!

    Key resources

    Questions and Answers

    Q. How does this Feature Pack differ from the out-of-the-box Team Foundation Server and Microsoft Project add-in?
    A. The Microsoft Project add-in allows project managers to use Microsoft Project to connect to Team Foundation Server to collaborate and participate in the planning and execution of software development projects. The Feature Pack enables integration between Team Foundation Server and Project Server and allows planning and status information to be synchronized between the two systems.

    Q. Are there any prerequisites or dependencies for this Feature Pack?
    A. Dependencies are:
    • Team Foundation Server 2010 + SP1 beta
    • Visual Studio 2010 + SP1 beta
    • Project Server 2010 or 2007
    For a detailed description of dependencies and prerequisites please check the beta documentation mentioned above.

    Q. Do customers need to apply this Feature Pack to Team Foundation Server or Project Server?
    A. The Feature Pack must be applied to Project Server (2010 or 2007). The Team Foundation Server 2010 SP1 beta must be applied to Team Foundation Server 2010. Check out the documentation for more details.

    Q. What MSDN Subscription level is required to download the beta?
    A. This Feature Pack will only be available to Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN subscribers (go to your MSDN download center, you should find the Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server Integration Feature Pack as an available download). An organization must own at least one license of Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN. With that one license, the software can be downloaded and installed and then all users with access to either the Project Server or the Team Foundation Server products that are integrated can benefit.

    Q. Can I use this release in production?
    A. The beta comes with a “go-live” agreement. If the user agrees to the terms in the pre-release license agreement then they are eligible to use the environment in production. As usual we recommend testing out this beta release in a test/staging environment prior to any product rollout.

    Q. When will the final version be ready?
    A. Pending your validation, it will ship sometime in the first half of next year (2011).

    Christophe Fiessinger
    Senior Technical Product Manager, Microsoft Project
    http://blogs.msdn.com/chrisfie
  • Microsoft Project 2010

    TechEd Europe, come meet the Project technical team in Berlin, 8-12 Nov

    • 0 Comments

    Find out more clip_image003

    This year Microsoft Project 2010 will have exceptionally strong presence in the upcoming Microsoft TechED Europe in Berlin 8-12 November, if you have not registered yet time to do so!

    • Four dedicated Project 2010 sessions for IT Professionals and Developers, including the very first public presentation on the upcoming Team Foundation Server and Project Server Integration.
    • Your favorite Project 2010 Self-paced Hands on Lab (OFS210-HOL)
    • Booth with top subject matter experts for Project 2010 from Seattle and Germany – come to ask questions!
    • Lastly - giveaways a best seller book for all Project Server 2010 deployments, t-shirts with your favorite logo and more!

    Details

    Sessions

    Title

    Description

    Speakers

    OFS224 - Project 2010 Demo, Demo, Demo - Overview for IT Professionals and Developers

    Built on SharePoint 2010, Microsoft's Enterprise Project Management 2010 solution comprises Microsoft Project Professional and Project Server 2010, and helps organizations select and deliver the right projects, reduce costs, drive efficiencies and ultimately, plant the seeds to grow the business.
    This session provides an overview of the key investment areas and capabilities of Project Server 2010 and Project Professional 2010, including demand management, portfolio analysis, core project management, time tracking, and business intelligence/reporting. Lots of live demos!

    Christophe Fiessinger, Jan Kalis

    OFS305-IS - Project 2010 Deployment And Upgrade - the theory, the myth and the best practices

    Project Server 2010 is built on SharePoint 2010 and provides relevant information to SharePoint and/or Project Server IT Professionals who plan, deploy and manage Project Server 2010 Farm.
    Specific topics discussed will include how to architect, deploy and configure Project Server within the context of a SharePoint Server 2010 farm, including capacity planning. We will also discuss the upgrade and migration from previous versions of Project Server 2007 and 2003, as well as Project Portfolio Server 2007.

    Christophe Fiessinger, Jan Kalis

    OFS306-IS - Project 2010 Development for SharePoint Developers With Real-World Examples

    Microsoft Project Server 2010 is built on the rich SharePoint 2010 platform and thus offers a wide variety of customization options. This session provides resources for getting started quickly with Project 2010 development. It also shows real-world examples, including extensibility of Project 2010, and options for Line of the Business Application integration with Project Server 2010.

    Jan Kalis

    OFS201 - Application Lifecycle Management - Microsoft Project 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010, Better Together

    Integrating Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) and Project Portfolio Management (PPM) processes helps to improve visibility across the entire application development lifecycle, empowering project managers and developers to follow their own methodologies yet be connected seamlessly with each other.  In this session, we provide an overview of the recently released Microsoft Team Foundation Server 2010 and Project Server 2010 Integration Community Technology Preview (CTP) Virtual Machine. This virtual machine provides an overview of the integration of Team Foundation Sever 2010 and Project Server 2010.
    We explain and demonstrate the four scenarios highlighted in this virtual machine that provides: Up-to-date project status and resource availability across agile and formal teams; lets Project managers track high-level requirements, while team leaders manage the details; enables Project managers to work in Project Server, which supports their workflow, while team leaders work in TFS, which supports theirs.

    Aaron Bjork, Christophe Fiessinger

    Booth
    Q&A
  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Come meet the experts online today and in person soon

    • 1 Comments

    Customer registration

    Come visit the Project Momentum “virtual” booths and connect with the experts today

    Enter the showcase

    Click here to enter, http://www.microsoft.com/Momentum booths

    For the first time we will be showing digital partner booths to highlight the capabilities of our Microsoft Project & Portfolio Management competent partners.

    Come experience the innovative showcase environment , connect with these experts online and then meet them in person at the event.

    Come to the Project Momentum  2010—EMEA, will be held in Barcelona, Spain on November 16 – 18, 2010. Registration is now open for  Europe, Middle East and African customers. To register, please click the button below.

    Customer registration

     

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  • Microsoft Project 2010

    At a Glance: Roles vs. Generic Resources

    • 0 Comments

    Project Server 2010 supports both resource roles and generic resources. On the surface, these terms may appear to be redundant. If you want to call out a Developer in my project, do you do so by identifying a “Developer” role, or by creating a generic resource called, “Developer”?

    You use roles during resource constraint analysis, part of the portfolio analysis process. Resource constraint analysis is the process of looking at the resource needs of a project proposal, and comparing that with the resource capacity of the organization. (For example, Proposal A needs 5 Developers, and our organization has 4 Developers available.) In Project Server 2010, resource constraint analysis relies on roles. You can identify “Developer” as a role, and then assign that role to either named resources (“real” people), or to generic resources (placeholders). Project Server 2010 will only consider resources with defined roles during resource constraint analysis.

    You use generic resources, on the other hand, are used as placeholders for named resources. You may have a generic resource named “Developer” that also has the role of “Developer.” Just like saying Joe is a developer, when you use a generic resource, you are saying that “Developer” is a developer. In the context of portfolio analysis, you should use generic resources when you know the role type and quantity needed for a project (for example, two Developers), but you don’t have to know the names of the actual people who will do the work.

    Want to read more? The following topics cover resource constraint analysis in detail, with clarification on roles and generic resources:

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Tips and Tricks: Copy custom views, filters, tables, and other elements to other projects

    • 3 Comments

    After you start working with Project, if won’t be long before you get creative and start customizing views, tables, filters, reports, and so on. And it won’t be too long after that when you begin to think about leveraging your creativity by applying it to all your future projects. Welcome to the Project organizer.

    The organizer is a dialog box that allows you to copy Project elements between files, or between a file and the global template. What is the global template? It is a special Project template that is associated with every project file that you create.

    For example, suppose you customize the Gantt chart with cost columns, then rename the view “Corporate Cost Gantt.” And now you want to use the new Gantt chart in all future projects. Here’s what you do.

    1. For Project 2007, on the Tools menu, click Organizer.
      For Project 2010, click the File tab, click Into, and then click Organizer—but see note below for some differences.
    2. In the Organizer dialog box, click the Views tab.
    3. The list in the right box contains the custom views in the currently open project.
      Note    to see Project elements from other projects, you’ll need to open those projects first.
    4. The list on the left contains elements in the Global template (also knows as Global.MPT). Your job is to move the custom element from the right side to the left side.
    5. Select the custom view on the right side, and then click Copy. The custom view will be copied to the Global template and be displayed on the left side.
    6. Now, it get’s a little tricky at this point. If your “Corporate Cost Gantt” view contains columns that you’ve added, then you’ll need to copy over the associated table as the next step. The associated table is the one you specified when you created the custom view in the first place. Typically, this would be the Entry table for chart views. So your next step is to click the Tables tab, and then copy the Entry table to the Global template. Got it? (If not, leave a comment, and I’ll clarify some more.)

      Now all future projects will have the custom view available to them with the correct underlying table (so will all projects created in the past, in case you didn’t figure this out).

           image 

    Here’s a couple things to keep in mind.

    • For Project 2010, the organizer behaves a bit differently. By default, new views are are automatically saved to the global template file and thus are made available to future projects (as are new tables associated with the view). To change this setting, on the File tab, click Options, and then click Advanced. Find the setting in the Display section:

                 image

    Changes to existing view elements in Project 2010 are not automatically saved to the Global template with this setting. If you’ve changed the Gantt chart and want those changes reflected in future and past projects, then you’ll need to manually copy over the Gantt chart into the Global template, as well as the underlying table.

    • If you want to copy Project elements from one project file to another file (but not to the Global template), in the availability list, select the second file. The second file needs to be open to do this.

      image
    • Task information cannot be copied over in this way. If you want specific tasks to be part of each project, save the current file as a regular template.
    • Values in custom value lists (i.e. lookup values) cannot be stored in the Global template. Use a regular template for this situation, as well.
  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Enabling Better Collaborative Project Management with Office 365 and Project Professional 2010

    • 2 Comments

    Today, Kurt DelBene announced Office 365, which we believe will define the future of productivity. Office 365 is a new cloud service that brings enterprise-grade productivity to everyone. This is an important announcement for the industry and Microsoft. I encourage you to watch today’s global press conference about Office 365 on the Microsoft News Center (www.microsoft.com/presspass).

    I wanted to blog about this news to explain what it means for Microsoft Project 2010. As many of you know, we offer Project Server 2010 cloud hosting through numerous partners that many customers are already taking advantage of today. With SharePoint Online as part of Office 365, we now deliver great collaborative project management in the cloud through the Project Professional synchronization to SharePoint just as we do today for our on-premise customers.

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    SharePoint Online as part of Office 365

    Microsoft Project 2010

    Office 365 Project Pro. Synchronisation

    Office 365


    The Project Professional 2010 ability to publish plans to SharePoint allows project teams to share and update Project tasks through SharePoint lists. Project plans can be easily updated by team members and quickly communicated to executive stakeholders.

    Highlighted features of Project Professional synchronization to SharePoint Online as part of Office 365 include:

    • Publishing your Microsoft Project Professional 2010 project plans to SharePoint task lists in Office 365 allows team members to view and update task status. This allows project managers to then automatically synchronize updates directly into the Project Professional project plan. Project managers also have the choice to extend the number of additional fields to synchronize between SharePoint and Project.
    • The synchronization feature will help resolve any conflicts in task information that are identified during workspace synchronization.
    • SharePoint task lists in Office 365 can be converted to Project Professional 2010 project plans.

    For a demo of the Project Professional 2010 collaborative capability see Microsoft Project Professional 2010 SharePoint Synchronization

    For more details on Microsoft Project Professional 2010 see Microsoft Project Professional 2010

    Download a free trial of Microsoft Project Professional 2010 at Download Center Microsoft Project Professional 2010

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Microsoft Project
    http//blogs.msdn.com/arpans

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    An invitation for customers to join us in Barcelona for the Project Momentum event

    • 1 Comments

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    An invitation for all European , Middle East and African Microsoft Project 2010 & Microsoft Project Server 2010 customers to join us in Barcelona, Spain on November 16 – 18, 2010  for the Project Momentum 2010 event.

    Key Highlights of Project Momentum 2010—EMEA are:

    • Obtain unique insights from customers and partners into how Project 2010 delivers flexible work management solutions
    • Learn about innovative capabilities in Project 2010 that solve your organization's unique and specific needs
    • Share best practices and learn new ways to win in challenging business scenarios
    • Understand how to leverage your investments across related Microsoft technologies
    • Attend 15+ in-depth breakout sessions across business and technical tracks, see the agenda at Agenda
    • Participate in Hands on labs and see live product demonstrations
    • Hear thought provoking keynotes and guest speakers, to review the speaker see the Speaker list
    • Come see, hear and interact with our Microsoft Project & Portfolio Management certified partners. Visit their exciting virtual booths now on Virtual showcase and meet them in person at the event.

    Connect and collaborate with industry practitioners, partners, executives, technologists, and the Microsoft Project team

    To register, please select the “register now” button below.

    Registration for this event is $75.00 (USD).

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  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Project 2010 Customer Success and Dynamics SL 2011 Integration

    • 0 Comments

    My name is Arpan Shah and I’m the Director of Microsoft Project Product Management at Microsoft. I moved into this role this past June 2010 having led Technical Product Management for the SharePoint team for the SharePoint 2007 and 2010 releases. I’m especially excited to lead the Project Product Management team given the exciting new in-market Project 2010 technologies, the strong partner ecosystem, passionate customer community and fascinating vision! With a customer base that exceeds 20,000,000 Microsoft Project users and over 10,000 organizations that use Microsoft Project Server, it’s definitely a great place to be!

    Since launching Project 2010 in May, we’ve seen a tremendous amount of excitement from Project Managers, partners and decision makers. We’ve had an incredible number of downloads of the beta and evaluation software and we’re getting positive feedback from users on new client features like the Ribbon UI, timeline view and SharePoint sync, just to name a few. When it comes to Project Server 2010, enterprises such as Volvo, Amdocs and Marquette University are deploying Project Server 2010 today to manage their IT portfolios, reduce costs, maximize resource allocations and improve workflows. Along with great customers, we have a large skilled Microsoft Project partner community and you can learn more about them at http://www.microsoft.com/project/en/us/solutions-partners.aspx.

    What makes the Project 2010 release special is how it enables individuals, teams and organizations to manage all their work, not just projects. It’s a vision we strongly believe in and something we’ll continue investing in the near and longer term. To execute on this vision of providing a holistic set of Project Management technologies, one of our focus areas is to integrate with other key systems such as the Office, SharePoint, SQL BI capabilities, Team Foundation Server and Dynamics. Integration with other technologies helps users seamlessly manage and maintain all their projects across systems.

    In fact, just last week, the Dynamics team announced that Microsoft Dynamics SL 2011 will be generally available in March 2011 across North America and will have out-of-the-box integration with Project Server 2010. This will bring together project management and project accounting for mid-sized project-driven organizations through functionality that reduces redundant data entry, provides synchronization of project and accounting information, as well as the creation and viewing of budgeting and net profit information. This release continues a long history of Project and Dynamics integrations beginning with the 2003 release.

    So what’s next? Over the next few months, you’ll continue to see innovation coming from Microsoft, our partners and customers. We’d love to hear from you through our blog, forums and at events. In fact, this week, we’re one of the key sponsors for the PMI Global Congress conference in DC. So if you’re here, swing by our booth (#1001), try Project 2010 and tell us about your Project Management experiences! You can also visit http://www.microsoft.com/project and watch videos, download a free trial and get more product information.

    Arpan Shah
    Director, Microsoft Project
    http://blogs.msdn.com/arpans

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Live Chat Announcement - Want to learn more about Office 2010 and Windows?

    • 0 Comments

    Would you like to learn more about the cool new features in Office 2010 and Windows 7 and what has changed since previous versions? Do you use Microsoft Office but would like to learn tips and tricks to be more productive at home, school or at work? Perhaps you are a new user who has questions on how to get started with Windows 7 or using the Office ribbon? Or would like to learn how to protect your computer from malware and viruses. Or perhaps you are just stuck and need answers.

    The Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs) are here to help! The MVPs are the same people you see in the technical community as authors, trainers, user groups leaders and answerers in the Microsoft forums. For the first time ever we have brought these experts together as a collective group to answer your questions live. MVPs will be on hand to take questions about Microsoft Office 2010 or Office 2007 products such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, Project, OneNote and more. As well as the Windows 7 and earlier versions such as Windows Vista. In addition to Microsoft Office, the chat will cover Windows related topics such as upgrading, setup and installation, securing your PC, Internet Explorer, personalizing your computer desktop or having fun with Windows Live Essentials to share photos, make movies and more. All levels of experience are welcome from beginners and students to intermediate power users.

    Please join us for this informative Q&A style chat and bring on your basic and your tough questions! Project MVPs Andrew Lavinsky and Tim Runcie will be participating.

    When:  Thursday, Oct 14th between 10:00 AM and 11:00 AM PDT!

    To learn more and add a reminder to your calendar please visit our Communities site or Microsoft TechNet

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Tips and Tricks: Change the month the fiscal year starts on

    • 2 Comments

    I get this question a lot: How do I change the month that the fiscal year starts on? First, to make sure you’re reading a blog entry that pertains to you, let me define a fiscal year. The fiscal year is the year-long period, at the end of which an organization’s accounts are completed and financial statements are prepared for stakeholders and for tax purposes.

    Compare this to the calendar year, which is the  more familiar time between January and December (though an organization’s fiscal year can correspond to the calendar year). In other words, calendar years appear on walls in homes and offices, often printed with pictures of cats, family members, flowers, art, and other interesting things. Fiscal calendars do not.

    Here’s how to set the start of the fiscal year.

    1. On the File tab, click Options.

      image

      If you’re using Project 2007, click Options on the Tools menu.
    2. On the Project Options dialog, click Schedule, and then find the fiscal year drop-down list.

      image 

      For Project 2007, on the Options dialog box, click the Calendar tab.

    Now you’re all ready to do some serious accounting.

    Note    Your organization may have already set the start of the fiscal year for all projects, if you’re using Project Professional. If this is the case, you may not be able to change this setting if the project is published to Project Server. You can check with your Project Server administrator to find out for sure.

    One more thing. If you’re new to Project 2010 and need some help finding your favorite features on the new ribbon, take a look at the Project 2007 to Project 2010 interactive mapping guide. It’ll help get you started.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Tips and Tricks: Add miscellaneous costs to tasks using cost resources

    • 1 Comments

    Cost resources provide an easy way of applying miscellaneous or multiple costs to a task, like airfare and dining— in addition to the more commonly applied costs like people’s salaries or per-use costs, such as consultant fees.

    Cost resources don’t depend upon the amount of work done on tasks. Nor do they depend on any calendars used in the project, as do work resource salaries, or rate costs for material resources, such as computer time and rental machinery.

    Let’s look at this a little more closely since cost resources are created differently than the other costs, and they are applied differently as well.

    First, off to the Resource Sheet to create a few cost resources. In Project 2010, click the View tab, and then click click Resource Sheet.

                   image

                  In Project 2007, click the View menu, and then click Resource sheet.

    1. Add a couple cost resources, like Airfare and Dining. In the Type column for each cost resource, click Cost. In the example below, two cost resources have been added below a few people resources and material resources.

       image

      Notice that the cost columns for the cost resources become unavailable for editing. This is because the actual cost value of the cost resource isn’t set in this view, as the other costs are. The cost value for cost resources are set as you assign or apply this cost resource to a task using the Assign Resources dialog box.  Let’s look at this now.
    2. Go back to the Gantt Chart (I assume you know how to get there).
    3. Select the task that you want to apply a cost resource to, and then click Assign Resources.
      You can open the Assign Resource dialog box in a number of ways: 
        image On the Resource tab, click Assign Resources.
        image  Right click on the task, and click Assign Resources.
        image  Double click a task to bring up the Task Information dialog box, and then click the Resources Tab.
        image  For Project 2007, click Assign Resources on on the Standard toolbar.
    4. Select the cost resource that you entered into the Resource Sheet, and then in the Cost column, enter the value for this cost resource as applied to the selected task. After you type a cost value, click Assign to assign the value of the cost resource to the task. Notice when you do this that the cost resource and its value appear with the other resource names on the Gantt bar (and, No, you can’t remove the cost resource name and value from appearing with the other resource names).

       image

      Note   You can keep the dialog box open as you continue assigning cost resources to other tasks. Just click the new task behind the dialog box.

    Keep one important thing in mind as you use cost resources: You can reuse the same cost resource. That is, If two tasks require two different plane trips and thus two different airfares, simply use one value for the cost resource as applied to one task, and a different value for the same cost resource as applied to the other task. Make sense? If not, leave a comment, and I’ll try to clear up any confusion.

  • Microsoft Project 2010

    Finding Project Server 2010 documentation

    • 0 Comments

    Documentation for Project Server 2010 is spread across three websites: TechNet, Office.com, and MSDN. Each of these sites addresses a different audience. TechNet focuses on the IT Pro, Office.com focuses on the end user, and MSDN focuses on the developer audience. In addition to these three sites, blogs are also a great source of information.

    TechNet: Planning, deployment, migration/upgrade, and more

    TechNet provides Project Server 2010 documentation that focuses on the functions performed by administrators. You can find content on planning, deployment, migration/upgrade, operations, and troubleshooting, as well as technical reference material. There are two ways content is surfaced on TechNet: TechCenters and the Library.

    Project Server 2010 TechCenter

    First, let’s look at the Project Server 2010 TechCenter. The TechCenter provides links to content that we’ve identified as most commonly-used, as well as themed Resource Centers with links to content pertaining to a specific topic.

    To browse to the Project Server 2010 TechCenter:

    1. Go to TechNet.
    2. At the bottom of the left navigation list, click More TechCenters.
      image
    3. Under Server Products, click Project Server 2010. The Project Server 2010 TechCenter is displayed.
      image

    Information on the Project Server 2010 TechCenter is broken out into separate sections:

    SectionDescription
    News and Highlights This section provides a list of commonly used articles.
    Resource Centers This tab, in the Project Server 2010 Resources section, includes links to separate Resource Center pages. Current Resource Centers focus on Business Intelligence, Demand Management, and Upgrade and Migration.
    Evaluate, Plan,
    Deploy, and Operate
    These tabs, in the Project Server 2010 Resources section, contain links to articles that fall into that phase of Project Server 2010 implementation.
    Latest Content This section provides links to content we’ve recently published to TechNet. You can also keep on top of recent content updates by subscribing to this RSS feed.
    From the Trenches This column, written by Chris Vandersluis of HMS Software, provides deployment planning advice directly from someone who has been deploying enterprise project management solutions to customers in the field for years. Articles from this column are also available as an RSS feed.

    The Project Server 2010 TechCenter also includes many links to other resources, including blogs, forums, downloads, and other websites containing relevant content.

    Project Server 2010 Library

    For an all-up look at Project Server 2010 content on TechNet, use the Library.

    To browse to the Project Server 2010 Library:

    1. Go to TechNet.
    2. Click Library on the tabs going across the top of the page.
      image
    3. In the left navigation tree, expand Products and Technologies, and then expand Project Server 2010.

    Here, you can browse through all published Project Server 2010 articles on TechNet, broken down into categories. The Newly published content article (as mentioned earlier, also available as an RSS feed) is updated regularly with links to recently-published articles, and is helpful for staying on top of new content on TechNet. Another great resource for learning about new content published to TechNet is the Enterprise Project Management Content Publishing News blog (also available as an RSS feed). This blog helps to surface broader updates to content on TechNet, as well as links to individual articles.

    Providing feedback

    To provide feedback on TechNet articles, first determine which view you are using: Classic, Lightweight, or ScriptFree.

    image

    If you are using the Classic view, in the bar just above the article, you can use a five-star rating system. When you click to provide a star rating, a box appears where you can type in comments specific to the current article.

    image

    If you are using the Lightweight view, scroll to the bottom of the article and click Feedback. From there, you can type comments specific to the article you are viewing.

    image

    If you are using the ScriptFree view, click Feedback in the top-right portion of the article. This takes you to the MSDN, TechNet, and Expression Library Feedback Forum, where you can provide feedback on the script-free version of an article.

    image

    Office.com: End-user content for Project Web App

    Office.com provides documentation for Project Web App users. You can find content on creating and working with projects, managing portfolios, submitting and approving time and status, reporting on projects, setting up Project Web App, and more.

    To browse to Project Server 2010 content on Office.com:

    1. Go to Office.com.
    2. Click Support on the tabs going across the top of the page.
      image
    3. In the Current Product Help box on the top right portion of the page, click Project Server.
      image 
      The Project Server Help and How-To page is displayed.
      image

    Here, you can see links to content in the main graphic at the top of the page, as well as in the lists below the graphic. These lists help to surface some of the more commonly-used topics within the Project Server 2010 content on Office.com.

    For the full Project Server 2010 content set on Office.com, click through the categories listed in the Project Server 2010 box, on the top right portion of the page. Within a category, use the links on the left navigation list to browse through subcategories, or click Show all categories to return to the full list of top-level categories.

    Providing feedback

    To provide feedback on Office.com articles, scroll to the bottom of the article, and then use the buttons to answer “Did this article help you?”

    image

    Once you’ve clicked the Yes, No, or Not what I was looking for button, you can provide comments specific to the article you’re viewing.

    image

    MSDN: Project Server 2010 Developer Content

    Developer content for Project Server 2010, including the Project 2010 Software Development Kit (SDK) and the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) Developer Reference, is available on MSDN. You can find API documentation, sample code, and other supporting information. Much like TechNet, there are two ways content is surfaced on MSDN: Developer Centers and the Library. MSDN also has other resources you may find helpful.

    Project 2010 Developer Center

    The quickest way to get to the Project Developer Center is to type msdn.microsoft.com/project.

    To browse to the Project 2010 Developer Center on MSDN:

    1. Go to MSDN.
    2. In the gray box at the bottom of the page, under Core destinations, click Office Developer Center.
      image
    3. Click Products on the tabs going across the top of the page.
      image
    4. Under Project, click Project 2010.
      image 
      The Project 2010 Developer Center is displayed.
      image

    Similar to TechNet, the Project 2010 Developer Center provides links to content that we’ve identified as most commonly-used, as well as links to links to other resources, including blogs, forums, downloads, and other websites containing relevant content. Note that the Project 2010 Developer Center includes information for both Project Server 2010 and the Project 2010 client application. You can subscribe to an RSS feed for newly-published content across all Office applications, and then filter for Project Server.

    Project 2010 Library

    For an all-up look at Project Server 2010 content on MSDN, use the Library.

    To browse to the Project 2010 Library:

    1. Go to MSDN.
    2. Click Library on the tabs going across the top of the page.
      image
    3. In the left navigation tree, expand Office Development, then expand Microsoft Office 2010, and then expand Project 2010.

    Here, you can browse through the Project 2010 VBA Developer Reference and the SDK Documentation to find the relevant Project Server 2010 content. There is a link on the Project Developer Center home page to download the Project 2010 SDK, which contains documentation, 11 code samples, IntelliSense XML files for Web Services, VBA Help, schema references, and more.

    Other useful MSDN resources

    In addition to the Project 2010 Developer Center and the Project 2010 Library, MSDN has several other resources you may find helpful:

    • MSDN Community Content Wiki. If you are using the Classic view, you can also annotate Project topics in the MSDN Library using the MSDN Community Content Wiki. For example, you could add a tip or remark that you think other developers might find useful. This is different from providing feedback about a topic; you should use MSDN Feedback to report issues. The Project developer documentation team regularly monitors and responds to feedback, and we republish topics based on customer feedback. See “Providing feedback,” below, for more information.
    • MSDN Forums. You can also post a question to the Project 2010 MSDN Forums. There are three Project 2010 forums, including Project Customization and Programming.
    • Context-Sensitive Help and IntelliSense in Visual Studio. If you are using Visual Studio, you can also get context-sensitive Help by pressing F1 in your code. By default, Visual Studio 2010 uses online Help as its primary source. You can change this setting by clicking Help, and then clicking Manage Help Settings. The Welcome Guide of the SDK, which is accessible through the Start Menu shortcut by clicking Start > All Programs > Microsoft SDKs > Project 2010 SDK, includes detailed information about installing and using the updated IntelliSense XML files included in the download. Once the files have been copied to the right directory, you can get tooltips, auto-complete, and API descriptions in the Visual Studio integrated development environment (IDE) as you type and browse through code.

    Providing feedback

    To provide feedback on MSDN articles, first determine which view you are using: Classic, Lightweight, or ScriptFree.

    image

    If you are using the Classic view, in the bar just above the article, you can use a five-star rating system. When you click to provide a star rating, a box appears where you can type in comments specific to the current article.

    image

    If you are using the Lightweight view, scroll to the bottom of the article and click Feedback. From there, you can type comments specific to the article you are viewing.

    image

    If you are using the ScriptFree view, click Feedback in the top-right portion of the article. This takes you to the MSDN, TechNet, and Expression Library Feedback Forum, where you can provide feedback on the script-free version of an article.

    image

    Blogs: A great source for all kinds of information

    There are many, many blogs out there with Project Server, or enterprise project management, as a focus. Here are just a few Microsoft blogs worth checking out:

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