What’s new in Terminal Services Licensing for Longhorn? Part 2

What’s new in Terminal Services Licensing for Longhorn? Part 2

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Support for manual revocation of licenses

Earlier, it was not possible to revoke a license issued to a client. Issued licenses would automatically expire after a random period between 52-89 days and become part of the available license pool. Some customers wanted to have the ability to revoke a license and make it available immediately. The typical scenario is where a particular machine would no longer be used (e.g.: a machine was getting formatted) and the license had to be made available immediately to another client without waiting for the expiration period. To address this, we now have support for revoking a license. Through the License Manager UI or the new WMI providers in Longhorn, you can select a per-device CAL that was issued to a particular client machine and choose to revoke it.

Note that you can only revoke 20% of a specific version of a CAL at a time. So if there were 100 Windows Server 2003 per-device CALs installed, you could revoke only 20 of them at a time. Also note that revocation support is currently only for per-device CALs.

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  • Please add 5 and 5 and type the answer here:
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  • Just to clarify a little further, although this feature was added due to the number of support calls it probably generated, there is "technically" no need for this feature.  

    Suppose a device were to consume a per-device TSCAL which is leased for 54-89 days, but after being used for only 2 logons on the first day this client is no longer used.  If this were the last per-device TSCAL available, a Temp per-device TSCAL would be issued to the next client, where the temp TSCAL is good for 90 days.  The leased permanent TSCAL should always be returned to the pool in less than 90 days, which is before the Temp TSCAL expires.

    I am glad the feature was added, but wanted to point out why it is technically not necessary.

    Patrick Rouse

    Citrix Technology Professional

    Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server

    Provision Networks VIP

    President - Session Computing Solutions, LLC

    http://www.sessioncomputing.com

  • Per the Terminal Service's team blog, Microsoft has enabled support for revokation of TS Device licensing in Longhorn Terminal Services. This should come as great news for the 3 people who are a ...

  • Excuse me but... is the number right? 10 percent or 20 licences?

    []s,

    --

    Vinicius Canto <scripterbr_at_gmail_dot_com>

    MVP Visual Developer - Scripting

    MCP Windows 2000 Server, Windows XP e SQL Server 2000

    Blog sobre Scripting: http://viniciuscanto.blogspot.com

  • Thanks for catching this. It is 20% so the number should be 20 licenses and not 10 as mentioned in my post

  • I've updated the post to change this to 20.  Thanks, Vinicius.

  • Requesting Beta CALs To try out the Beta versions of TS Licensing you do not need to purchase CALs from

  • How long does the revoked CAL stay in the UI.  I revoked a CAL for a client device and then connected with the same device (just to test).  The revoked CAL stayed in the UI and the client didn't take a new one.

  • RE: If this were the last per-device TSCAL available, a Temp per-device TSCAL would be issued to the next client, where the temp TSCAL is good for 90 days.  The leased permanent TSCAL should always be returned to the pool in less than 90 days, which is before the Temp TSCAL expires.

    It's true that the Temp per-device TSCAL is issued on a first visit, but what about subsequent visits from that device? The purpose of the "initial-visit-temp" license was to ignore "oops" connections, and to avoid consuming licenses by old thin clients,etc.

  • One the first conection from a client device, where the Terminal Server is in Per-Device Mode, is out of the initial 120 day grace period, and is able to contact an activated Terminal Server License Server (TSLS), the TSLS issues a Temp TSCAL. Upon the second connection, if the TSLS has available Per-Device TSCALs, a permanent TSCAL is issued to the client device for 54-89 days.  If no Per-Device TSCALs are available, the Temp TSCAL is retained by the device for up to 90 days.  If after 90 days no Per-Device TSCALs become available, the Temp TSCAL will expire and the client device will be refused connection until more per-device TSCALs are added to the TSLS or the license key is deleted from the registry of the client device.

    Mike Burke has written some articles about this process here:

    http://www.msterminalservices.org/articles/Licensing/

    Patrick Rouse

    Citrix Technology Professional

    Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server

    Provision Networks VIP

    President - Session Computing Solutions, LLC

    http://www.sessioncomputing.com

  • Obviously Patrick Rouse must be ribbing us over how things are supposed to work and how they do work to joke a bit. Surely is the revokation od per device cals was not needed then what were all those calls about needing to do so. Of course it wouldn't be needed if the 90 day temp design worked. Hmm, wonder what those trouble calls (STRs) were all about then? Why would anyone ever see a rejection from the TS that there were no licenses when a user tried to get in?

    Thanks for the enhancement, Microsoft. Longhorn is looking good. :)

    - Brian

  • "Why would anyone ever see a rejection from the TS that there were no licenses when a user tried to get in?"

    This would happen when all TSCALs have been allocated, after their temp TSCAL has expired, or when their permanent TSCAL needs to be renewed.  A permanent per device TSCAL is not issued until the second successful connection by a client device.

    My intent on posting to this blog was to inform people how the TSLS actually works, not to say that this isn't a useful addition to the Terminal Server Management Toolset.  We all know that every administrator is not going to be a Terminal Server expert, so any tool that makes their job easier has got my vote.  

    All that being said, what I originally posted still holds true.  It helps to know why the system works the way it does.

    Patrick Rouse

    Citrix Technology Professional

    Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server

    Provision Networks VIP

    http://www.sessioncomputing.com

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