Ron Jacobs

Windows Workflow Foundation

Blog in my mouth...

Blog in my mouth...

  • Comments 1

Strange thing these blogs... It's like a loaded gun that can go off on you.  In the vastness of cyberspace with the trillions of web pages out there, who would have thought that anyone would find my blog.  I have been meaning to blog for a very long time, but this week I finally took the plunge.  2 nights ago I wrote my first blog and didn't tell a soul about it, the next morning it seems everyone has read my blog.

Now I suppose that if I were just an ordinary citizen that this would be no big deal, but here I am a Microsoft Product Manager spouting off (and with no review of what I am saying.)  I must be mad!

<Disclaimer>The following represents the personal and private opinion of Ron Jacobs, any resemblence of these comments to persons alive or dead is purely coincidental</Disclaimer>

So I stirred up the waters a bit with my suggestion about community blocks.  I understand the concerns about poor quality that can be found in many community projects.  Let me first say IT'S JUST AN IDEA - so chill out a little while I consider it more carefully :-). 

  • Do I believe that the .NET community could build some very useful functionality into community blocks?  Yes I do.
  • Do I believe that this will happen all on its own?  No I don't. 

I think that it will take some kind of structure and guidance to see this happen.  Will our team do this?  Who knows... I just hope that someone will.

  • I strongly believe that it would be in the interest of the .Net community (and therefore in the MS's interest) to encourage community development of Application Blocks. Having spent a few years in the Java world (yes, I admit it ;-) ), I see the power of community as a strong adjunct to a platform. The challenge is to allow a community effort to create, maintain and extend application blocks and still maintain a coherent direction.

    I can see a clear distinction between Open Source efforts such as nUnit, nAnt and Log4N and the blocks, but, when an OS implementation reaches broad acceptance, I think it makes sense to "bring it into the fold" rather than create a competing application block.
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