Unable to find a decent answer to this question on all of the internets I checked, I figured I'd better step up to the challenge and answer this simple question.


So you've installed Azure PowerShell.

Now you are asking yourself "WHAT VERSION OF AZURE POWERSHELL HAVE I INSTALLED?!"

First, stop screaming. Find that Caps Lock Key.

 

Updated way: The easiest way in the world to do this – launch an Azure PowerShell session. And then type the following:

> get-module azure

ModuleType  Version    Name                                ExportedCommands                                                                                                                   
----------       -------    ----                                ----------------                                                                                                                   
Binary            0.7.4      Azure                               {Add-AzureAccount, Add-AzureCacheWorkerRole, Add-AzureCertificate, Add-AzureDataDisk...}   

You can see right in the output there is the version of Azure (0.7.4) in this case.

A secondary way to do this is to actually look at the web request itself:

1) Use the Web Platform Installer to install the latest Azure PowerShell version (http://www.microsoft.com/web/downloads/platform.aspx)

2) Launch an Azure Powershell session

3) Run the Add-AzureAccount command and add your azure account

4) Install and launch Fiddler - http://www.telerik.com/fiddler (I can't do my job without Fiddler, so keep this thing around)

5) Enable HTTPS Decryption in Fiddler (takes 2 clicks to do -http://docs.telerik.com/fiddler/Configure-Fiddler/Tasks/DecryptHTTPS )

6) Run some benign Azure PowerShell command now like "Get-AzureLocation"

7) Look at the awesome output in Fiddler - find your Web Request, select it, then on the right side of the screen select INSPECTORS tab and then the HEADERS sub tab

8) You should see some Client: User-Agent header like -

image

 

At the end of the User Agent is the version – v.0.7.4 in this case.


HTH! – more posts coming soon

Matt Sampson