New templates and Web Parts for portal sites and improved administration strengthen SharePoint Server (formerly SharePoint Portal Server) as a platform for corporate portals. Corporate portals, Web sites that provide organized access to corporate information, remain an important way to deliver applications and data to employees and external business partners. However, upgrading large, customized existing SharePoint portals to the new version will be complicated, existing hardware may need to be upgraded, and customers might require help from systems integrators for planning, customization, migration, and training.

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This top-level Web page was generated by the SharePoint Server 2007 Collaboration Portal site template and contains Web Parts, links, and tabs to prebuilt subsites. At the top of the page (1) a set of tabs represent the major subsites. For example, the Document Center is used for managing important documents; the Reports tab brings users to the Report Center, which is used for building, storing, and managing key performance indicators (KPIs), reports, and dashboards.

All pages in the site have a control (2) for entering search queries and a menu called Site Actions (3), which provides access to various configuration and administration tools for the sites. For example, an administrator or user with appropriate permissions could use the tools in Site Actions to change the layout of content on a page or add or delete Web Parts. Visitors without appropriate permissions do not see the menu.

Web Parts serve as the primary window to content on SharePoint pages and workers can customize sites and pages by adding and configuring Web Parts. The page contains several Web Parts (4), including the new RSS Viewer that gives users a simple way to connect to and view RSS feeds, such as those generated by Internet news sites.

A quick link section (5) provides a configurable mechanism for displaying other subsites—when a new subsite is created, its author can choose to have a link to it displayed in this section. Also shown in the quick link section is SharePoint's new Recycle Bin feature, which is similar to the Windows Recycle Bin.

This top-level Web page was generated by the SharePoint Server 2007 Collaboration Portal site template and contains Web Parts, links, and tabs to prebuilt subsites. At the top of the page (1) a set of tabs represent the major subsites. For example, the Document Center is used for managing important documents; the Reports tab brings users to the Report Center, which is used for building, storing, and managing key performance indicators (KPIs), reports, and dashboards.

All pages in the site have a control (2) for entering search queries and a menu called Site Actions (3), which provides access to various configuration and administration tools for the sites. For example, an administrator or user with appropriate permissions could use the tools in Site Actions to change the layout of content on a page or add or delete Web Parts. Visitors without appropriate permissions do not see the menu.

Web Parts serve as the primary window to content on SharePoint pages and workers can customize sites and pages by adding and configuring Web Parts. The page contains several Web Parts (4), including the new RSS Viewer that gives users a simple way to connect to and view RSS feeds, such as those generated by Internet news sites.

A quick link section (5) provides a configurable mechanism for displaying other subsites—when a new subsite is created, its author can choose to have a link to it displayed in this section. Also shown in the quick link section is SharePoint's new Recycle Bin feature, which is similar to the Windows Recycle Bin.

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