This is taken from the GotDotNet Workspace and provides more insight on what is included in the project:

 

Over the last few years, as an active member of Health Level Seven (HL7) standardization organization, Microsoft significantly contributed to specifying how Web Services may be used as an open, secure and efficient communication infrastructure for Healthcare oriented information exchange.

That work, namely HL7 Web Services Profile – release 2 – (WSP2), has been recently published as Draft Standard for Technical Updated under HL7 Transport Specifications.

 

Healthcare solutions providers, who are designing and developing systems accordingly to HL7 specifications, should use the guidelines contained in HL7 Web Services Profile to build Web Services that are technically and semantically interoperable by design.

 

To assist architects and developers in doing this, Microsoft has envisioned, designed and developed an HL7 Web Services Software Factory.

Leveraging HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM), Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and Guidance Automation Toolkit, the HL7 Factory provides architects and developers with the models, process, tools, and code templates to automate the production of Web Services conformant to HL7 specification on Microsoft .NET platform.

 

Software architects and developers who want to know more about the HL7 Software Factory can leverage the resources listed below:

  • HL7 Factory architecture and design whitepaper, available for download here at Microsoft Architecture Center.
  • A detailed discussion on Web Enablement of HL7 applications has been also published on Architecture Center.
  • HL7 Factory Release 1 installer (.msi) is available for download on GotDotNet HL7WebProfiles workspace. Microsoft Visual Studio Beta 2 and GAT May CTP are required to install the factory.
  • A detailed walkthrough presentation is also available on the same GotDotNet workspace.
  • Most recently, a whitepaper on the lessons learnt in designing and implementing the HL7 Software Factory has been presented at OOPSLA 2005 - International Workshop on Software Factories and it is available for download here.

Edited: corrected the link to the GotDotNet workspace.