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  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# VII: Phantom Method Semantics

    By now, my hope is that you all have a well-rounded view of dynamic. We started this series by introducing dynamic and talking about the basics of the feature , and have just finished talking about some of the feature's limitations with the intent that giving both the good and the bad will help us gain...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# VI: What dynamic does NOT do

    As I mentioned last time , there are a few gotchas that we'll need to look at in order to get a full understanding of the dynamic feature and its capabilities. Today we'll take a look at some of those limitations. As we go along, I'll try to shed some insights as to how the decision making process came...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# V: Indexers, Operators, and More!

    Now that we're all experts in how dynamic invocations work for regular method calls, lets extrapolate from our previous discussion about phantom methods a bit and take a look at how those basic concepts apply to other dynamic operations. Today we'll just go through a laundry list of each type of operation...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# IV: The Phantom Method

    Yes, this does sound like a Star Wars movie, but no, I'm not a Star Wars geek that just likes to pull lines from my favorite movies (though I rather enjoyed Star Wars). This post will deal with what we've coined "the phantom method". It's the method that the static compiler will bind to during...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# III: A slight twist

    Last time we dealt with the basics of dynamic binding . This time, we'll add a small twist. First, lets recall the example we were using last time: static void Main( string [] args) { dynamic d = 10; C c = new C(); // (1) Dynamic receivers. d.Foo(); // Call. d.PropOrField = 10; // Property...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C# II: Basics

    Last time , we began to dive into dynamic binding in C# and what happens through the pipeline. This time, we'll take a simple scenario and pick apart the details of what happens under the covers, both during compile time and runtime. We can break down what the compiler does into three parts: type and...
  • Blog Post: Dynamic in C#

    The other day I was playing around with some office code, and I found myself writing a lot of code much like the following sample that Anders used at his PDC talk : static void Main( string [] args) { var xl = new Excel .Application(); (( Excel . Range )xl.Cells[1, 1]).Value2 = "Process Name"...
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