OK, when I am wrong, I can admit it.  And I have been informed I have had a few posts that need some fact-checking.  I was always under the impression that GDN was a "Skunkworks"—one of those cool things that happens at Microsoft when people throw away the rulebook and just do it in their "free time" as opposed to an official mandated project. Actually, my assumptions come from the stories I have been given second-hand and third-hand.  Well, that's what you get for listening to Redmond tall tales.  As Sara Williams has informed me, there has indeed been a GDN team that she herself led.  It started in the developer division and moved to MSDN.  I knew her role but did not realize this was a dedicated team as well, so I owe them all an apology.  They should be very proud of what you’ve done--GDN has helped people immensely, especially in the early days of .NET. I guess I assumed that the reason GDN had insufficient resources is because they never officially had them in the first place and people finally ran out of steam in terms of giving up their free time.  Well, I've been set straight.  Sara and her team deserves a lot of credit for GotDotNet up to this point.  It's no wonder she subsequently took over MSDN, not only owning GDN but MSDN all up.  Thanks Sara.  I hope we can do for VS 2005 what your GDN did for VS.NET 2002.