Scott Oseychik

Microsoft | Embedded Escalation Engineer | Exchange People Groups Team

Outlook can't connect to Office 365

Outlook can't connect to Office 365

  • Comments 12

Having difficulty connecting Outlook to Office 365?

 

Check out our easy-to-use, self-guided walkthrough troubleshooter!

Office 365 Outlook Connectivity Guided Walkthrough
http://aka.ms/outlookconnectivity

 

Still having issues?  We have a plethora of resources available to resolve your problem:

Office 365: Outlook and mobile device connectivity troubleshooting resources
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2757863

 

Finally, if your mailbox was migrated from Exchange Online ("EXO") Wave 14 to EXO Wave 15, you may need to update your Outlook profile.  This is due to a change in EXO Wave 15 architecture in which we authenticate at the Transport layer (HTTPS) and no longer require RPC authentication (which will cause repeated prompting for credentials).

To fix the Outlook profile:

  • Start Outlook
  • Click "File"
  • Click the "Account Settings" drop-down, then select "Account Settings"
  • Select your e-mail address, and click "Change"
  • Click "More Settings"
  • Select the "Security" tab, and change the "Logon network security" drop-down to "Anonymous Authentication."

Props to Ryan Phillips for the EXO Wave 15 info!


Hope this helps,

-Scott

 

Comments
  • i forgot my password to log in to my e-mails

  • Hi Bruce,

    Please see the following article to have your password reset:

    community.office365.com/.../3931.aspx

    Hope this helps,

    Scott Oseychik

  • Hi

    Do you know a way to change this setting through Group Policy or registry settings?

    Tomas

  • Check out Stephen Griffin's blog for all things MAPI :)

    blogs.msdn.com/.../stephen_griffin

    Also, this Microsoft Outlook whitepaper discusses the PR_PROFILE_AUTH_PACKAGE property:

    office.microsoft.com/.../afile.aspx

    “Logon network security” drop down corresponds to:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Profiles\[your profile]\[some subkey]

    00036619

    REG_BINARY value of 01F00080 sets this to "Anonymous"

  • Hi Scott,

    This is the exact issue I'm facing except I used the Microsoft Office Customization Tool to create a PRF file. I was surprisingly simple, but there was no setting to change "Logon network security" to anonymous. Would you happen to know the value / syntax to add to my PRF file to manually customize it?

  • Hi Dan,

    Sorry about the delayed reply; unfortunately, I'm not versed in the Office Customization Tool.  Encourage you to open a case with Customer Support Services, and reference this discussion.  Specifically, see above where we've discussed the Registry Key / value that controls this, but isn't exposed in the Office Customization Tool.  Thanks!

    Regards,

    Scott Oseychik

  • Scott - THANK YOU! You're a life-saver.

    Dan -

    In your .prf file, you'll need to add the following mapping in section 6, under [Exchange Global Section]:

    LogonNetworkSecurity=PT_LONG,0x36619

    Note that, as a custom mapping, the name "LogonNetworkSecurity" is actually kinda' arbitrary - I just tried to make it meaningful. The main thing is that it matches-up with the secant part of the process; add the following in section 4, under [ServiceEGS]:

    LogonNetworkSecurity=0x8000F001

    That's been doing the trick for me. I've got a large configuration project for a bunch of non-domain joined computers that presently have Outlook doing POP3 duty, sucking everything down to a local .pst file. So, between a really simple batch script, and a .prf file, I can have them enter their credentials once, then let it auto configure an O365 profile, and re-attach their existing .pst as an archive.

    Pax

    -A

  • Oops - wasn't signed in for that last comment:

    Scott - THANK YOU! You're a life-saver.

    Dan -

    In your .prf file, you'll need to add the following mapping in section 6, under [Exchange Global Section]:

    LogonNetworkSecurity=PT_LONG,0x36619

    Note that, as a custom mapping, the name "LogonNetworkSecurity" is actually kinda' arbitrary - I just tried to make it meaningful. The main thing is that it matches-up with the secant part of the process; add the following in section 4, under [ServiceEGS]:

    LogonNetworkSecurity=0x8000F001

    That's been doing the trick for me. I've got a large configuration project for a bunch of non-domain joined computers that presently have Outlook doing POP3 duty, sucking everything down to a local .pst file. So, between a really simple batch script, and a .prf file, I can have them enter their credentials once, then let it auto configure an O365 profile, and re-attach their existing .pst as an archive.

    Pax

    -A

  • Outlook 2010 SP1 has no option for Anonymous in the "Logon network security" dropdown. This is still a supported version, so what do we do with this? We're getting credentials prompts continuously.

  • @Fergus

    I encourage you to engage Microsoft Customer Support Services (CSS).  We should be able to identify which post-SP1 patch your Outlook clients need, or perhaps recommend SP2.  I'll leave this to the Outlook experts here in Support.

    Best,

    Scott Oseychik

  • Thanks Scott. I did and they advised the following:

    community.office365.com/.../updates-to-outlook-2010-and-outlook-2007.aspx

    The page doesn't mention any service packs but the fix ending 623 doesn't seem to install without SP1.

    It's frustrating getting part-information from MS and having to spend a lot of time finding out what's wrong while you wait for CSS to get back to you.

    This is just for anyone else wondering the same thing.

    F.

  • Hi Fergus,

    I can understand your frustration here, and after reviewing the KB article you referenced (support.microsoft.com/.../2687623), I see no mention of SP1 being a pre-requisite.  Normally our KB articles call out any pre-reqs that must be satisfied prior to install, but clearly, we've made a mistake on this article.  While it may be of little value / consolation to you now, I'll make sure this article is corrected.

    Regards,

    Scott Oseychik

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