Good hygiene and Banned APIs

Good hygiene and Banned APIs

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Jeremy Dallman here with a quick note about a code sanitizing tool we are making available to support one of the SDL requirements – Remove all Banned APIs from your code.

This requirement was put in place to prevent use of certain older C runtime functions that lead to buffer overrun flaws and have been deprecated. In the Security Development Lifecycle book, an entire chapter is dedicated to the topic of banned function calls. In the book, we also provide a copy of the banned.h header file on the companion CD. This header file allows you to locate any banned functions in your code.

On MSDN, we have document the SDL list of Banned Function Calls, but the header file has not been publicly available outside the SDL book until now. Today, we are providing the banned.h header on the Microsoft Download Center.

Find the banned.h header here

By including this header file, then using #include “banned.h”; you will be able to locate any banned functions in your code. The full list of banned APIs is also included in the header file.

Alternately, if you are using the compiler in Visual Studio 2005 or later, you have a built-in way to check for these banned functions. To catch banned C runtime functions, you can compile with /W4 and then triage all C4996 warnings. In code reviews, you should always remove any code that disables the C4996 warnings - e.g.: #pragma warning(disable:4996). This is one simple way to ensure your code is released without banned functions.

Sanitizing your code to remove potentially insecure APIs is a vital protection. Whether you include the banned.h header file or leverage the /W4-C4996 warnings in the Visual Studio 2005 compiler, you now have two ways to check your code and meet another SDL requirement in your development phase.

Comments
  • The MSDN article with the function list has this entry:

    alloca, _alloca -> SafeAllocA

    However, I cannot find SafeAllocA neither on MSDN nor in PSDK headers, and the only thing that appears when I do that Google search is that very MSDN article. What is it?

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  • Over the last few years I have written a number of articles, papers and books describing some of the

  • For those writing in C, you will be interested in a posting on The Security Development Lifecycle blog

  • What's the license attached to banned.h?

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