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Services for UNIX - Interoperability

A blog on Services for UNIX and UNIX Interoperability components in Windows by Ashish

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  • Blog Post: Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 3 (Advanced Mapping)

    Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 3 (Advanced Mapping) Simply said - when you map users and groups manually with their UNIX counterparts, it's called Advanced Mapping. From the last post on User Name Mapping, you may be aware that Simple Mapping automatically creates maps for all users and group...
  • Blog Post: Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 2 (Simple Mapping)

    Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 2 (Simple Mapping) Continuing the discussion from Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 1 - I will explain how to get Simple Mappings done in this post. To rephrase, User Name Mapping (UNM) bridges the gap between the different user identification used in Windows...
  • Blog Post: Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 1

    Configuring User Name Mapping - Part 1 On this page , I have put some information about how you can configure User Name Mapping. It doesn't have the complete step-by-step kind of touch to it since that article was all about getting Server for NFS to work. To do justice to User Name Mapping, I am...
  • Blog Post: How User Name Mapping works?

    How User Name Mapping works? User Name Mapping is the core NFS authentication component in Services for UNIX, Windows Server 2003 R2 and Windows Vista. It bridges the gap presented by difference in user identification methods used by Windows and UNIX systems. It plays equally important role for Server...
  • Blog Post: Set up Server for NFS in Windows Server 2003 R2

    Set up Server for NFS in Windows Server 2003 R2 In this post, I will talk about configuring Microsoft Services for Network File System, mainly Server for NFS and User Name Mapping , in Windows Server 2003 R2. You can follow the same steps for Services for UNIX (SFU) 3.5 except only a few of them because...
  • Blog Post: Using chown/chgrp from UNIX clients

    Using chown/chgrp from UNIX clients Why it is still owned by 4294967294? Haven’t I mapped root user to Administrator user? Well, you might recall – in Windows world a file or directory can be owned by a user or a group. Since default owner happens to be the Administrators group, you can see this...
  • Blog Post: Configuring User Name Mapping

    Configuring User Name Mapping We can now mount the share on the Linux client and can also create files. Next thing we should do is to configure User Name Mapping and see it in action. So let’s go back to our Windows system. I have created few local users and group on this Windows systems and the...
  • Blog Post: Who's 4294967294?

    Who's 4294967294? Why is /mnt/nfs owned by something like 4294967294 and why is the group set to the same? Why there are no permissions for anyone except the owner on the nfs directory? I am root on the Linux client so why is myfile owned (again) by 4294967294? Well, first of all, remember we have...
  • Blog Post: Active Directory Lookup? Or, User Name Mapping? Or Both?

    Active Directory Lookup? Or, User Name Mapping? Or Both? User Name Mapping in Windows Server 2003 R2 and Services for UNIX allows you map UNIX user and group accounts to their Windows counterparts (both local and domain accounts). This service is used by Server for NFS and Client for NFS (also by...
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