August, 2004

  • .NET Security Blog

    Assembly Level Declarative Security

    • 20 Comments
    Assembly level declarative security comes in three forms, RequestMinimum, RequestOptional, and RequestRefuse. The three can be briefly defined as: RequestMinimum -- the set of permissions that are absolutely required for this assembly to run RequestOptional...
  • .NET Security Blog

    All About Assert Part I: What Assert Actually Does

    • 11 Comments
    There are several common misconceptions about the Assert stack modifier, not the least of which are: Assert changes an assembly's permission grant Assert is just a perf optimization You don't need the permissions that you're Asserting in order to effectively...
  • .NET Security Blog

    All About Assert Part III: Dispelling the Myths

    • 7 Comments
    So far we've seen What Assert Actually Does , and What Assert Is Good For , now its time to examine some popular misconceptions about the Assert stack modifier. Myth #1: Assert changes an assembly's permission grant Assert is a stack walk modifier. It...
  • .NET Security Blog

    SafeHandle

    • 12 Comments
    Prior to Whidbey, interop with Win32 handles was done by passing IntPtrs back and forth through P/Invoke. This had several drawbacks including: Lack of type safety. Nothing is preventing me from taking an IntPtr containing a HWND and passing it to a method...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Post Build Assembly Modification Or: Why Won't SN -Vr Work on Tampered Assemblies

    • 1 Comments
    A while back I wrote about delay signing an assembly, and using SN -Vr to register that assembly to have its signature verification skipped. However, some people have noticed that SN -Vr doesn't work if you fully sign an assembly and then tamper with...
  • .NET Security Blog

    All About Assert Part II: What Assert Is Good For

    • 1 Comments
    Now that we know what Assert does , lets figure out what it's good for. The two most common uses of Assert are: Perform high-privilege operations on behalf of untrusted code Convert one permission demand to another Yesterday's example demonstrating what...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Serializing Permissions Across CLR Versions

    • 4 Comments
    An interesting question came up in the newsgroups today. If you serialize a permissions set (either by calling ToXml().ToString() directly on the permission, or by converting to an XML Element ), you'll get permissions that look like this: <IPermission...
  • .NET Security Blog

    New ILAsm Support For Assembly-Level Security

    • 1 Comments
    Before Whidbey shipped, using assembly level declarative security was always a bit of a pain. Previous versions of the CLR required you to provide security attributes in the form of XML, which meant that you would have to figure out the exact XML represented...
  • .NET Security Blog

    All About Assert Part IV: When Assert Won't Help

    • 1 Comments
    In Assert Myth #7 , I mention three ways for a demand for a permission to fail even though that permission was asserted. The first three are: Myth #3: You don't need the permissions that you're asserting in order to effectively assert them Myth #4: Assert...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Matt Pietrek on How Iterators Work

    • 0 Comments
    One of the things on my blog todo list was to write an entry showing how C# iterators work under the hood. Well, Matt Pietrek beat me too it. You can find an exploration of the state machine that the C# compiler generates for you when you create an iterator...
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