November, 2009

  • .NET Security Blog

    Transparency 101: Basic Transparency Rules

    • 1 Comments
    One of the biggest changes in the .NET 4 security model is a move toward security transparency as a primary security enforcement mechanism of the platform. As you'll recall, we introduced security transparency in the v2 release of .NET as more of an audit...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Transparent and Critical Code

    • 0 Comments
    Last time we looked at the set of operations that can only be performed by security critical code . One interesting observation is that just because you are doing one of these operations does not mean that your method in and of itself is security sensitive...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Transparency as Enforcement in CLR v4

    • 0 Comments
    Now that we know the basics of security transparency , let's look at how it evolved over time. In .NET v2.0, many of the transparency rules we previously looked at were in place , with the exception of some of the inheritance rules that were introduced...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Transparency Models: A Tale of Two Levels

    • 0 Comments
    Earlier this week, we looked at how the v4 CLR continued the evolution of the security transparency model that started in v2 and started evolving with Silverlight in order to make it the primary security enforcement mechanism of the .NET 4 runtime. The...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Differences Between the Security Rule Sets

    • 0 Comments
    In my last post I talked about the two different security rule sets supported by the v4 CLR .  At a high level, level 1 is the v2.0 security transparency model, and level 2 encompasses the updated v4 security transparency model.  Digging down...
  • .NET Security Blog

    SecAnnotate Beta

    • 0 Comments
    One of the design goals of the security transparency system in the CLR is that it should be as static as possible and not rely on dynamic state (such as the call stack) to function. A fallout of this is that we can write tools to analyze assemblies and...
  • .NET Security Blog

    Using SecAnnotate to Analyze Your Assemblies for Transparency Violations – An Example

    • 0 Comments
    SecAnnotate (available in the final .NET 4 SDK, and in beta form here ) can be used to analyze your assemblies, especially APTCA assemblies in order to find transparency violations without needing code coverage from a test case. Instead, the static analysis...
Page 1 of 1 (7 items)