Oh crud.  I reposted an article that I had written a few years ago, and recommended C# as well as suggest that you take a look at LISP.   And I need to include a mention of the Royal Wedding Couple to get a few views. 

Here are a few links (if you are here for the Royal Wedding, see below):

Not code but an article with lots of links (which web crawlers like, in case you are doing SEO):

Parallel Programming with Microsoft.NET: good book, price is $0.00, which with the falling dollar is a good price and one that is stable.  Yes, it isn’t F# uniquely, but it does discuss what Parallel Programming is all about:

Now for an SEO break.  The real blog starts after the following paragraph which is placed in the blog for a little humor and to attract web crawlers.

<Warning: Royal wedding mention>

I just realized that with the Royal Wedding I had been distracted, after all to get page views, and I am certain that conversation about artificial intelligence will likely come up during the news coverage about the Royal Wedding.  Since the Royal Couple is so hip I am certain that they are equally concerned about the use of Artificial Intelligence by their subjects.  As a result Kate Middleton and Prince William discussion about artificial intelligence will likely be a part of the Royal Honeymoon.  Also, I think it probable that Kate Middleton and Prince William will exchange lambda equations secretly during the Wedding Reception.

Here is a picture of Kate Middleton, who may give some thought to lambda equations.  Prince William is contemplating the use of garbage collection as the means of erasure, and that is why he is so happy!  Actually, they are kind of cute. 

<Pictures of the Royal Couple>

<Pictures of the Royal Couple>

And now I have to turn in my man card.

image

</Warning: Royal wedding mention>

Ok, it’s the end of the month, and I need a few more views, so thanks for coming back for a read. Now back to artificial intelligence and F#

Now back to artificial intelligence and the best language you might use.  Currently, I think that it is F#.  Why? F# is tuned to be able to run concurrently and use processors efficiently.