Most people just don't believe me when I tell them I am actually an introvert.*  I've had many a job that required me to go out of my comfort zone regarding personal privacy.  Nothing rivals the change (transformation?) that I've undergone in the year and half since I've taken this evangelist gig for Microsoft however.

What has caused me to reflect on this change now is that I am in the process of evaluating possible online community locations for the growing DigiGirlz population.  Where should we meet?  What shall we share? A simple blog seems kind of retro, doesn't it?

2 years ago I only occasionally used IM, didn't read blogs, must less write them.  Now the 'social' part of my life takes up a good part of every day.  Let's see, can I even remember all that I do?

type details
Email 8 accounts - MS, GMail, Excite, Yahoo, ATT, Facebook, Twitter, WebFluent
NG various products + MCTs
IM 4 clients - Live, Facebook, yahoo, MS communicator
Blog 2 blogs - MSDN - SoCalDevGal and geekSpeak
Social Networking Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pownce, SlideShare, GoodReads, MySpace, maybe more, I can't remember them all...
Webcasts geekSpeak on MSDN and Channel9 weekly, occasionally for Channel8 and Virtual TechEd. I try to at least take pictures and prefer to take video at every live event I deliver.
SharePoint too many site to count
Other Zune, CodePlex, SkyDrive

What's really been interesting to me is that despite the proliferation of contact methods, people's individual preferences remain.  What I mean by this is that most people prefer only a couple of methods of contact, such as to only email me, no matter what other methods I invite them to use.  Others only use IM or Twitter and so forth. 

It really strikes me that this versatility that I've managed to cultivate is making me more effective - because in increasing the methods of communication, I am reaching a larger audience (which is, in fact, my core job).  It's also kind of fun, in a weird sort of way.  It certainly keeps life interesting.  I also note that I rarely use my phone to make calls.  I never use voice mail (I actually find it annoying).  Retrieving Email and interacting with Social Networking sites via my phone works well for me.  Text messages usually indicate big trouble or big fun, so they get my attention.  Probably the 'low man' on the communication totem pole is faxing.  Requests for faxes get on my nerves.

So, on Monday I am taking a leap into yet another 'place'.  One of my colleagues - Zain, has been running some innovative programs in Second Life.  He (along with some other Second Life community members) is going to be my tour guide.  In preparation I've been reading (remember that? ;) an interesting book about the growth and possibilities of Second Life. It's a fascinating book, the Second Life story being told kind of reminds me of EBay's beginnings.

Guide to Second Life 

So now I get to think about even more aspects of virtual communication - what will my avatar look like?  Where will she 'live'?

This exploration of new communication methods has been such an intriguing journey - I wonder where it will lead to next?

I am also interested in the experiences of my readers.  Have you been affected by the these different possibilities for communication? If so, how?

*actually I am an actress, but then, all intelligent women are (by necessity) - that, however, is an entirely different conversation.