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  • Blog Post: Does your enterprise architecture add up?

    So you have an enterprise architecture ... How well does it work? Here is a quick test, a mere 5 questions, intended to help evaluate it. But first a few rules; This is only applicable to DEPLOYED architectures. Generally, deployed means stable and used by at least 2 applications for at least...
  • Blog Post: The slippery slope of enterprise architecture definition

    Step with me if you will onto the slippery slope of enterprise architecture definition. I try to capture the boundaries of the enterprise in a single simple layered boxes-and-lines diagram. Relationships are conveyed through adjacency and separation helps define inappropriate lines of communications...
  • Blog Post: On safari for the ever elusive enterprise definition

    Two skills have served me well while gathering information about an enterprise. First, the lessons it has been my pleasure to have learned from my customers and the many, many, bright practioners I have been lucky enough to work with. Second, the ability to forget all of those lessons and question everything...
  • Blog Post: How do we define the scope of an enterprise?

    How big is your enterprise? It turns out to be a very difficult question to answer. Consider this simple scenario; You have a newspaper delivery route. Your supplier pays you as a contractor. You receive the newspapers each morning from another independent contractor. Each home you deliver to is...
  • Blog Post: As-is vs. To be

    Many discussions of how-to-do architecture talk about modeling the domain 'as-is' then defining the 'to-be' state. In general I agree, clearly defining the problem before identifying the solution is a risk mitigation technique. By focusing on the current state you avoid artificially injecting constraints...
  • Blog Post: Shredding Requirements

    I spent most of yesterday going through 60+ verbose PowerPoint slides and 45 pages of detailed requirements. You see I have a customer who has run into several issues rooted in their initial design considerations. They are a CMM level 3 organization with detailed procedures, voluminous documentation...
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