August, 2009

  • Steve Clayton

    SharePoint in plain English

    • 3 Comments


    SharePoint in Plain English

    It looks like my pal Lee over at CommonCraft has been doing some more work with Microsoft – this time with the SharePoint team. Initially I thought “huh…who’d want a 3 minute guide to SharePoint” but in hindsight perhaps this could be a very useful tool for Microsoft Partners.

    SharePoint is a business growing at speed and there are lots of partners doing cool stuff with it – to a non technical person it could sound pretty confusing all that tagging, sharing, publishing, blah blah but a quick 3 minute video explains it in (American) English.

    Let me know if you’re a partner and interested in downloading and I’ll see if we can get that sorted.



  • Steve Clayton

    Art & Copy

    • 0 Comments

    ART & COPY looks like my kind of movie. The guy at the end is a bit OTT with his view that creativity can solve anything but maybe he’s right…though I got the impression he thought adverts could rather than creativity generally.

     

    hat tip to Swiss Miss

  • Steve Clayton

    New version of TweetMeMe Plugin

    • 1 Comments

    image 

    The plugin God that is Scott Lovegrove has updated his TweetMeMe Plugin for Windows Live Writer. You can now choose a different URL shortening service.

     

    Tweetememe is becoming the defacto retweeting tool on the web which I’m delighted about for Nick and his team. They got a great new feature coming up that will allow retweeting of comments.

    the update can be downloaded from Live Gallery and in related news, Scott has also published a plugin that does text translation using Bing.

  • Steve Clayton

    How does the Internet see you? Get your online persona calculated

    • 1 Comments

    stevecladna1

     

    I’m having a lot of fun with Aaron Zinman's Personas.

    Zinman is a PhD student in MIT's Sociable Media Group and has produced an addictive natural language processing application to create your online persona in something that looks like a DNA strip.

    The outcome is questionable based on a few test I did of friends and famous folks but the animated process of building your persona is TOTALLY addictive. To quote from the personas site

    Enter your name, and Personas scours the web for information and attempts to characterize the person - to fit them to a predetermined set of categories that an algorithmic process created from a massive corpus of data. The computational process is visualized with each stage of the analysis, finally resulting in the presentation of a seemingly authoritative personal profile

     

    To be fair to Aaron, he does mention on the site that part of the fun is “the computer's uncanny insights and its inadvertent errors, such as the mischaracterizations caused by the inability to separate data from multiple owners of the same name” which clearly is responsible for the large yellow blob below that suggests I am sporty :)

    stevecladna

  • Steve Clayton

    The lessons of Microsoft Bob

    • 1 Comments

    microsoft-bob 

    Monica Harrington’s guest post on Techflash on The lessons of Bob is a great read. Bob has had it’s fair share of critics over the years and it’s now the butt of jokes from ourselves. For those who don’t know the history it’s on Wikipedia.

    What’s great about Monica’s post though is the lessons that can be taken from Bob - not just for Microsoft but for anyone with a dream of building and launching software. I especially liked this one

     

    2) Consumers don't care about strategy. Corporate customers do because if they're investing big dollars over many years in a product, they want to know that it will continue to evolve in ways that are beneficial to the organization. In the corporate market, selling a vision is huge. By contrast, selling a vision to consumers is pointless. The key question they want answered is, "Does it make my life better today?" (BTW, I suspect Bob 3.0 had potential to be great.)

     

     

    So true. Over the last 10 years we’ve built a vast army of people who are great at talking strategy and building enterprise relationships. Consumers, especially Gen Y, couldn’t care less. They just want you to change their life now. And again tomorrow.

    You can learn as much by looking backwards as you can by looking forwards.

     

    Trivia: did you notice that Microsoft Bob’s face is the nerd emoticon in Live Messenger?

    bob

Page 5 of 13 (64 items) «34567»