Windows Phone 7 Design Resources

Windows Phone 7 Design Resources

  • Comments 3

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I’ll say from the start that I’m a fan of Metro – the new design system for Windows Phone 7. It’s already inspired a great Twitter client and having played with a WP7 recently, I continue to be impressed. I like it’s clean, elegant 2D look versus the now overused, glossy, reflective look. I actually like both from a design perspective but prefer Metro for now at least.

You can now get a collection of resources should you be interested in designing for WP7 or perhaps you’re just interested in UI design. The UI Design and Interaction Guide for Windows Phone 7 v2.0 and Design Templates for Windows Phone 7 are now both available.

Also available as a PDF is the Windows Phone Design System - Codename Metro. I believe this is the source of the book that was recently handed out at MIX10 (if memory serves) with pages full of stuff like this…

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Call me a design geek…but I like it.

[bonus link - Meet Your Type: A Field Guide to Typography (free PDF)]


 






  • I find it terribly ironic that such emphatic proponents of typography would turn around and produce literature written largely in uppercase.  Paragraphs composed entirely of uppercase letters are difficult if not physically painful to read.  Lowercase glyphs make up around 95% of the text we read on a daily basis; our eyes are trained to read them with maximum efficiency.  Reading that Metro brochure quite literally hurts my eyes.

  • THIS IS A GREAT

    DESIGN DECISION

    TEXT WAS MADE

    TO BE READ IN

    REALLY SMALL

    COLUMNS AND

    NO ONE USES

    WORDS THAT

    EXCEED THE

    BOUNDARIES.

    EYES

    WERE

    MADE

    TO

    WORK.

  • Yeah, the typography thing is a little bit lazy if you ask me. The WP7 lacks ambition when it comes to UX vision. I look at this as being a clone of the Zune concept simply because it was easy and didn't require much thought leadership beyond that.

    Zune works because it has and had a very narrow scope to work within. Cloning this and retro fitting that vision into the WP7 again simply highlights Microsoft's lack of ambition.

    I'm hanging in though for WP7, I'm hoping after this the stabilization release the next version is where the real $100 spends get applied.

    Scott Barnes

    Ex-Rich Platforms Product Manager for Microsoft.

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