• Steve Clayton

    Lync day at Microsoft

    • 0 Comments

    I’m sat in Building 34 on Microsoft Campus in Redmond and just caught the end of the webcast from our Lync launch today in NYC. I missed the part with BillG but a fun moment to see him back “on stage” with ChrisCap. They have that famous moment together of course…

    It’s been a crazy month of launches around here – Windows Phone 7, Kinect, Lync….the hits just keep on coming and I hope Wall Street is watching. There’s energy around Microsoft that I’ve not felt in a while. We’re back in the game in a number of places, creating some new games, and leading in others (IMHO).

    As for Lync…I couldn’t live without it. I use it for everything from chatting with my boss in the UK, talking to my co-workers in San Francisco, pinging my friends back home in the UK and talking to my family at the weekend. It’s become part of the fabric of how I work and live…so much so that I almost forget about it.

    The infographic and the list below pretty much covers why I dig Lync

    1. Unified experience. Go from an instant message, to a voice call, to a video call, to a meeting, to a shared whiteboard session – all within the same Lync 2010 experience.
    2. One-click web conference.  Use Outlook to set up a web conference with one-click of the mouse.
    3. Connect with family. While you’re travelling, use Lync to start a high-definition voice and video conversation with any Windows Live Messenger user around the world.
    4. Hush that annoying meeting participant.   When someone has poor audio on a conference call or lots of background noise, Lync will identify which phone to mute to improve quality – and productivity.
    5. Device switching. Switch between your head-set and phone in the middle of a call with device switching.  Use that same head-set to make a phone call using WiFi on an airplane.
  • Steve Clayton

    The Future of Technology

    • 0 Comments

    our Windows guys are on a roll. I love this video.

    inspired by Lost Generation of course.

  • Steve Clayton

    What went down?

    • 1 Comments

    image

    Do you want to know what went down in history right at the spot you’re stood? That’s what History Here for Windows Phone 7 does. A neat little app by The History Channel that I came across in the Gizmodo app review.

    I think these sort of apps have so much potential – particularly for education but obviously tourism. I think of it as bringing to life all those icons from Ordnance Survey maps and road maps…

    Check out the Giz video

    image

  • Steve Clayton

    Searching the Windows Phone 7 marketplace

    • 1 Comments

    search copy

    Okay, maybe it’s just me (probably) but I only just realized Windows Phone 7 has the ability to search the marketplace from your phone. You just click the search button on your phone while you’re in the marketplace….duh. Obvious to everyone else maybe but I only just spotted this. Very handy.

    Meantime, Gizmodo has a great video review of the Windows Phone 7 Essential Apps

  • Steve Clayton

    Supercomputing from your desktop

    • 0 Comments

    cray2

    When I was back in college, the Cray supercomputer was a mythical thing – not least as it looked like a fancy park bench – but power has always been good in computing. Speed wins they say….but it’s not all about speed. A lot of the time it’s about access. If you want to get access to a supercomputer, you need to head to your local

    With that in mind, Our Azure folks are out in force at SC10, the annual supercomputing conference in New Orleans and they have some interesting announcements. Service pack 1 for Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 is coming before the end of the year and will enable customers to connect on-premises high performance  systems to Windows Azure – giving them cloud bursting – or computing capacity on demand.

    The image below is one I used way back on this blog to explain what the cloud, and Azure can do. The Service Pack addresses many of these scenarios. Meantime, for biotech scientists they just got access to the National Center for Biotechnology Information's BLAST technology through Azure. What does that mean? Well back in the good old days, if you wanted access to computing power you had to share time with others to get time on vast computers that filled entire rooms. The PC era brought great power to the desktop but if you’re a scientists looking to run a genome sequence comparison of say a million bits of data…your PC is gonna creak. You need supercomputing power….but you probably don’t want to wait in line for it. The cloud just changed all of that – the BLAST application that these scientists use is now on Azure and whether a scientist needs 5 computers or 5000 to run their query, they can dial it up on demand.

    image

Page 8 of 796 (3,976 items) «678910»