MP900447888[1]

Is it possible to develop an emotional attachment to a computer? I think so. I have had my Toshiba Portege M400 laptop since I joined Microsoft 4 years ago and we have had some great adventures together. We have travelled the world to various Innovative Educator Forums, presented to hundreds of teachers, seen three incarnations of Windows and Office, responded to thousand of emails, been introduced to Twitter and of course writing this blog. I now have most of those experiences stored ready to transfer to my new laptop.

But, a thought struck me, is it the same in schools? What learning experiences have the computers in school facilitated, is that captured in some way? What happens to all that work when the technology is replaced or the student leaves ? What happens to that ‘redundant’ technology?

I am interested in finding out two things, so your comments would be most welcome :-

  • What do schools do with students work stored on servers and hard drives? Can students take their work with them ?
  • What mechanisms do schools use to recycle or re-purpose technology? especially in light of this article .

Are any of you giving students when they leave, their e-portfolio? Documenting their whole school life, is this something that would be useful to them? I still have my Year 10 biology exercise book, it hasn’t been a lot of use, except to remind me of how awful my writing was and is! But, if life  learning long learning is the goal for students, then having such a resource could contribute to that.

How are schools breathing life in to ‘old’ kit? My laptop is destined for a an Intern at Microsoft, it will serve exactly the purpose they need . Do you have any strategies that you would like to share, that utilise and extend the life of apparently redundant technology?

This will be the last post I write on my trusty old Toshiba, not a single blue screen in 4 years. Thanks old friend, its been a blast.