• Numbers 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64,…, 2^n are special and good
  • You don't remember the name of your first grade teacher or the street you lived on in 3rd grade, but you can provide intimate details of your first computer program (and/or computer)
  • Everything can be broken.  Sometimes, hammers and pliers help
  • Crashing is what makes it worth all the effort
  • Weird Al's "It's all about the Pentiums" is your Windows startup sound
  • You know Jeff Goldblum couldn't have taken down the entire alien armada without a least a unit test
  • You regularly use the terms "Mutex", "Wound-Wait protocol", and "queue*" in everyday conversations.  *Note: Excludes citizens of Canada or the UK
  • You feel compelled to fix or annotate typos and grammatical errors on all e-mails, documents, signs, websites, shopping lists, …
  • Words like "re-iterate", "normalcy", and "irregardless" drive you to remind people that just because a word is in the dictionary, doesn't mean it actually is a word
  • If the waiter says the plate is hot, you don't feel confident of that fact unless you've reproduced the same result at least twice.
  • Everything needs an engineering improvement.  This includes lines at the supermarket, The Weather Channel, and the rotation of the planets.  A good tester would have insisted the orbits be circular!
  • House is your hero; as is Grissom.
  • You wonder what will happen when Microsoft gets to building 256 (or 257, depending on if the 0 entry is used)
  • Mythbusters is on your TIVO
  • You are willing to debate for hours with an English professor that the correct way to say "lock, stock and barrel", is "lock, stock, and barrel".