Microsoft Translator (and Bing Translator) Official Team Blog

News and Views from the Microsoft Translator (and Bing Translator) Team in Microsoft Research.

Office 2003 setup instructions (updated)

Office 2003 setup instructions (updated)

  • Comments 19

Update: Check out the new installer you can download to make this really easy!   

Following up on last week's post on the integration of translation into Office, here are the instructions to set it up in Office 2003, for our users who do not have Office 2007. 

1) Open the task pane

First bring up the task pane by selecting "Task Pane" on the View menu (or pressing Ctrl-F1):

image

2) Select the research pane

In the Task pane drop-down menu (here labeled "Getting Started"), select the "Research" task pane.

image

3) Go to the Research Options dialog

After you've chosen the "Research" task pane, there should be a "Research options" hyperlink at the bottom of the pane. Click on this hyperlink to bring up the task pane.

image

4) Select the "Add Services" button

image

5) Enter the URL of the Microsoft Translator Web Service

Here you'll need to type in the address of the Microsoft Translator Web Service:
http://www.windowslivetranslator.com/officetrans/register.asmx

Then click the "Add" button to continue.

image

6) Install the Microsoft Translator services

Just click the "Install" button in this dialog.

Note that you can't check any of the boxes; this is expected behavior. Translation systems, unlike other Research Pane plug-ins, are enabled in a different dialog. The next steps will cover this.

image

Now click "OK" to close the research options dialog.

7) Select the Translation subpane from the drop down menu

image

At this point, Word may bring up a dialog saying, "Microsoft Word can't open the translation feature. This feature is not currently installed. Would you like to install it now?" Click "Yes" to install the feature.

8) Bring up the Translation options dialog

Just below the combo boxes that allow you to select the source and target language, there should be a hyperlink labeled "Translation options..". Click on it to open the translation options dialog. (Depending on what text you have highlighted and which translation features are installed and enabled on your machine, the Research task pane may look slightly different. That's OK; just find the "Translation options..." hyperlink.)

image

9) Windows Live Translator as your translation engine

This is where you specify which translation engines you'd like to use for each language pair. By default Word uses WorldLingo for all language pairs; this is where you can choose Windows Live Translator instead. (Certain Word installations don't seem to come with WorldLingo pre-installed, so you may not have to change anything here.)

The language pairs currently available from MSR-MT are as follows:

English ↔ Chinese (Simplified)

English ↔ French

English ↔ German

English ↔ Italian

English ↔ Japanese

English ↔ Spanish

English → Arabic

English → Chinese (Traditional)

English → Dutch

English → Korean

English → Portuguese (Brazil)

You may have slightly different settings for Bilingual Dictionaries (on the top half of the dialog); that's OK. You only need to look at and change the Machine Translation settings (on the bottom of the dialog). Again, if Windows Live Translator is already selected, you don't have to do anything.

image

Click OK to close the dialog. You should now be ready to translate!

Using the Translation Feature

Now find or create a document that has some content you'd like to translate.

1) Select text, right click and select Translate

The easiest way to bring up and use the translation task pane is to simply select some content in your Word document, right click, and select the "Translation" option. You can also go to the Research task pane, type a query into the box, and select the Translation subpane.

image

2) Select an installed language pair

By default, Word will list a variety of language pairs, even if you haven't installed a machine translation system for those pairs. In the "From" and "To" boxes, select a source and target language that correspond to one of the language pairs you installed above.

image

3) Inspect your translated output

After a brief delay (during which the web service is invoked and the selected text is translated), the MT output should appear in the research pane.

image

4) Optionally insert the output into your document

At the bottom of the MT output, there's a button that allows you to easily insert the translated output into your document.

image

Leave a Comment
  • Please add 3 and 2 and type the answer here:
  • Post
  • PingBack from http://www.easycoded.com/office-2003-setup-instructions

  • I managed to set up the translator (JA-EN), but it does not work if 'Use online dictionary' is checked in the 'Translation options' dialog. Is this a bug?

  • Any way to set up this during Office 2003/2007 deployment? I want it pre-configured and ready for use.

  • Hi.

    First of all let me say that this is by far the best translation machine all around the web. Thanks for the outstanding job.

    I have two questions:

    I need to translate a memo field of a huge database (more than 23,000 records). The output should be stored in another field. I would like to know if you bear in mind any tool for doing this, or how would you approach this task.

    And a second question is about using the script to translate automatically a website. I have put the code into my website to call TranslatePageLink.aspx and works fine. My website is a forum actually and it is written in Spanish. I would like to translate it into English, but I find two problems:

    - The image go.gif brought by the script appears with border properties (a border of 1 pixel in the default blue color). How can I control this in order to draw the go.gif without border?

    - The alt properties of the same go.gif image should say "Traducir esta página", but instead of this, the message appears altered (the á character is replaced with some other characters). If this problem cannot be sorrounded, please replace the alt text with just "Traducir esta pagina"

    Thanks in advance for your help.

  • To Peter:

    >but it does not work if 'Use online >dictionary' is checked in the 'Translation >options' dialog.

    Office looks up short phrases in the online dictionary, and if there is no match, you get nothing. Longer phrases go only to the Translator. If you need a shorter phrase translated, which is not in the dictionary, you have to uncheck that box. If we did this again, it would be nicer to fall through to the translator every time the online dictionary returns nothing.

    Longer phrases always go to the Translator, regardless of the checkbox status.

  • PingBack from http://beqiraj.net/post/2008/08/Windows-Live-Translator-in-Microsoft-Office-Integrieren.aspx

  • Windows Live Translator in Microsoft Office Integrieren

  • Mes collègues de Microsoft Research l’annonçaient il y a quelques jours : toutes les paires de langues

  • Windows Live Translator in Microsoft Office Integrieren

  • Now you can translate your Microsoft Office documents with Microsoft Translator – right within Office!

  • I can't install Translator. It says I don't have Office 2003 installed on my computer, but I do have Office 2003 professional. What do I do?

    (WindowsXP home SP3 traditional Chinese, Office 2003 professional)

  • Do you have Office 2003 installed in the traditional place on your computer?  The following site might give you some tips as well:

    http://lifehacker.com/5219473/office-add+on-makes-live-search-the-default-translator?t=12232515#viewcomments

    Thanks!

  • Hola Esta es una muy buena herramienta para todos, Microsoft Research ha hecho muchas mejoras en esta

  • My PC has Office 2007 and the translation tool is already available on the machine.

  • I have Office 2003 on my home computer and will use this instruction to install the translation tool.

Page 1 of 2 (19 items) 12