Terry Zink's Cyber Security Blog

Discussing Internet security in (mostly) plain English

Abusive users

Abusive users

  • Comments 2

I have a YouTube account with a bunch of my videos on it, and about two months ago I was contacted by another magician.  He was commenting on my version of Any Card, wherein any named card appears at any named number in the deck.  It’s an incredible effect, it took me several months to learn.  This magician first contacted me saying that he had his own version (which I thought was cool) and asked where I learned mine.  Magicians are generally very secretive and exclusive, but amongst each other we are somewhat open.  In other words, you have to join the club.

The exchange over Youtube was cordial, but I’m pretty slow to respond to my Youtube message.  I just don’t log in there very often.  I would take sometimes a week or two to respond.  Anyhow, he asked me if I wanted to trade tricks.  I’d send him my Any Card version and in return he’d send me a couple of his videos.  We magicians like to trade secrets with one another.  I agreed and planned to do it, but as is like me, the amount of work I would have to do to send the manuscript was a lot of effort.  I procrastinated (for, like 5 weeks) and today I got the following message from him.  I was very surprised to receive it because all of our exchanges have been so cordial and positive.

[Warning: strong language]

image

Like I said, I was surprised to see this.  Surely he could have pinged me and said “Any update on this?” and that would have prompted me to get going quicker.  But instead, I receive the above abusive message and I am now disinclined to do any trading with him, not to mention leave him negative feedback on eBay.  I believe that this behavior is simply uncalled for.

So, readers, my point here is that this user is not spamming, but the behavior is abusive nonetheless.  Sometimes the motivation for sending electronic abuse is not financial.

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  • Please add 7 and 5 and type the answer here:
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  • There is no real identity security anywhere on the internet and particularily not on social network sites so you have absolutely now way of knowing the same person posted that message - could have been a hacked account, another person getting access to his machine while he was away, maybe he sold his machine and didn't clear it down, etc. etc.

  • So, how is the trick done? (j/k)

    There is always the possibility that the user was using a public computer and walked away, leaving the account signed in.

    Since there is no way to verify the identity of the abusive poster, perhaps you could take the high ground and cordially request clarification? If you discover that the magician is an actual hate-spewer, you can end the communication with a clean conscience.

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