Cloud Services SDK for Windows Phone 7 Beta

Cloud Services SDK for Windows Phone 7 Beta

  • Comments 4
Wp7

Project Hawaii Releases Cloud Services SDK for Windows Phone 7 Beta

The MRC Engineering team, in collaboration with the newly formed Microsoft Mobile Computing Research Center (MCRC), has released the fourth and final cloud service for Windows Phone 7 development: Optical Character Recognition (OCR).

This OCR service is the next step in the evolution of
Project Hawaii, the Microsoft Research project that is exploring how to take full advantage of the cloud to enhance the use of smartphones.

With Hawaii OCR, you can use your smartphone's camera to take a picture of an object that contains text (in Roman characters), send the image to the cloud, and in return receive a Unicode string of the text. This text string can be used in a number of interesting scenarios, such as translation of street signs or restaurant menus.

Download the SDK and start building Windows Phone 7 apps today. For more details, read the Aloha: Text from the Cloud blog.

Leave a Comment
  • Please add 4 and 4 and type the answer here:
  • Post
  • Lee Stott, one of our evangelists, has been posting a lot on the Faculty Connection blog about Windows Phone 7 , MSR and the cloud , amongst other posts, as he is more prolific writer than me. This one stuck in my mind though as its a great example of research, a consumer device and a real world example coming together for potentially practical use. Project Hawaii , from MSR, is a student-focused initiative for exploration of how cloud-based services can be used to enhance the WP7 experience.  The MRC Engineering team has released the fourth and final cloud service for Windows Phone 7 development: Optical Character Recognition (OCR). This OCR service is the next step in the evolution of Project Hawaii and with Hawaii OCR, you can use your smartphone's camera to take a picture of an object that contains text (in Roman characters), send the image to the cloud, and in return receive a Unicode string of the text. This text string can be used in a number of interesting scenarios, such as translation of street signs or restaurant menus. You can download the SDK and start building Windows Phone 7 apps today. For more details, read the Aloha: Text from the Cloud blog . So whilst some people write “sound apps”, you know what I mean, there are some very clever people thinking about more useful applications, though I have to admit having sound apps on my phone . If you need help getting started connect with us on Facebook .

  • Thanks for the info! I am currently in the process of collecting cloud OCR APIs to integrate them into mobile applications on three major platforms (Android, iOS and WP7+). It seems there are a surprisingly lot of cloud OCR solutions out there (from Nuance's OmniPage Cloud Service, Abbyy's ocrsdk, expervision, leadtools, etc. from alternativeto.net) and of course they are all commercial given the fact of that they have to cover the costs of operating the solutions in datacenters.

    I might have overlooked it or these are not public yet, but I could not find information on the cost associated with using Hawaii OCR and whether or not we could use it in mobile clients other than WP7. Also, some information on the QoS and future plans (e.g. support for Asian languages and layout retention, zone OCR and further output formats) would be very much appreciated! Thank you!

  • Hi Details of Hawaii can be found here research.microsoft.com/.../default.aspx

    With Project Hawaii, you can develop cloud-enhanced Windows Phone applications that access a set of cloud services and Windows Azure for computation and data storage. Project Hawaii provides the tools and services; you provide the creativity and imagination this only for Windows Phone. All the details re future enhancements etc will be on the URL above.

  • The newly released Project Hawaii Software Development Kit (SDK) 2.0, developed by the Mobility and Research Group, has added four more cloud services to Project Hawaii’s existing line-up, namely:

    • Key value pair, which enables the storage of any data in the cloud—easily and quickly

    • Translation, which, well, translates from one language to another

    • Text to speech, which does just what its name implies

    • Path prediction, which narrows location searches based on the direction of travel

    See - blogs.msdn.com/.../more-cloud-services-on-project-hawaii.aspx

Page 1 of 1 (4 items)