• Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Visual Studio 2015 SKUs for Students & Labs launch day 20th July 2015

    • 5 Comments

    Visual Studio 2015 is a rich, integrated development environment for creating stunning applications for Windows, iOS, and Android, as well as modern web applications and cloud services. To find out more information about the Visual Studio 2015, please visit Visual Studio site or watch Visual Studio videos on Channel 9.

    vsday

    July 20 at 3:30 pm GMT and watch the Visual Studio 2015 final release event online. Follow @visualstudio for updates. https://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/visualstudio-release-event-vs

    We invite you to join us online to learn about the new features and technologies coming with this release. You will be able to engage in live, interactive Q&A sessions with the engineering team, before jumping into the technical details covered in over 60 on-demand sessions.
    You will also have the opportunity to see the Visual Studio developer team creating an end-to-end solution for an open-source project, leveraging the newest tools and technologies. See how they tackle the different problems along the way, and ask them questions directly.

    Visual Studio 2015 launches on July 20th with several changes to the product line-up.

    As always Visual Studio 2015 will be made available at DreamSpark.com and through DreamSpark Standard and Premium at launch.

    DreamSpark will offer all three Visual Studio 2015 SKUs:

    1.Community

    2.Professional

    3.Enterprise

    Visual Studio 2013 included Premium and Ultimate SKUs for DreamSpark Premium schools. Both of these have been replaced by the single Enterprise SKU for DreamSpark Premium.

    Please note that as usual, Visual Studio SKUs in DreamSpark do not include an MSDN subscription

    Where can I download Visual Studio

    http://www.DreamSpark.com

    Only Visual Studio Community 2015 will be offered at DreamSpark.com. Visual Studio Professional and Express are being removed.

    Because Community and Professional are nearly identical, there should be no impact to student usage.

    DreamSpark Standard

    The DreamSpark Standard ELMS webstore will only offer Visual Studio Community 2015 for students.

    The DreamSpark Standard MSDN Benefit Portal will offer product keys for Visual Studio Professional 2015. This is to support lab installations in campus facilities.

    VS Community is not suitable for labs because each copy is activated by a single user’s Microsoft Account.

    DreamSpark Premium

    The DreamSpark Premium ELMS webstore will offer Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 for students.

    The DreamSpark Premium MSDN Benefit Portal will offer product keys for Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 for lab installations

    Getting Visual Studio Versions via DreamSpark

    dreamsparkoption

    So what is  Visual Studio Community.

    Visual Studio Community is identical to Visual Studio Professional except for three things:

    1)The Community license does not support Enterprise customers.

    2)Product activation of Community requires a Microsoft Account instead of a product key.

    3)The CodeLens feature is not included.

    In all other ways, Visual Studio Community is the same as Visual Studio Professional.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Installing XNA on Windows 8 with Visual Studio 2012

    • 4 Comments

    Guest blog by Simon Grey Lecturer in Games Development Studies at the University of Hull

    xna_logo

    XNA is a great framework for creating games, and we use it as a tool to motivate students to learn how to program whilst creating great games at extra-curricular events such as the three thing game. For us, a tools like XNA is an invaluable intrinsic motivator – inspiring students to want to learn to code, as opposed to being motivated because we said so, or because they will get better grades.

    According to the official documentation XNA requires Visual Studio 2010. Now, clearly it’s possible to install both Visual Studio 2010 and Visual Studio 2012 on the same machine, but that would have a big impact on the size of the image.

    To get around the limitation of our managed desktop Hard Drive capacity we would d rather not install both if we don’t have to, but if you try to install XNA on a machine that doesn’t include Visual Studio 2010 the installation will fail.

    However after some monitoring of the install process here is a nice walkthrough produced by the University of Hull of how to install XNA onto a machine with Visual Studio 2012. The University of Hull we are keen to provide students with as seamless an experience as possible when moving from working at home to working in university, with this in mind I Simon has developed the following blog post, so that students can use XNA at home with Visual Studio 2012 to allow them an easy transition to and from the machines at the University

    You’ll need to download this zip file which contains the entire XNA setup and the folders that you’ll need to copy yourself.

    1. Download the zip file and unzip it somewhere. You should see an executable called XNAGS40_setup.exe and a folder called XNA Game Studio 4.0
    2. Open a command line and navigate to the folder that contains XNAGS40_setup.exe – then run XNAGS40_setup.exe /x . You’ll be asked to enter a folder. It’s probably easiest if you create a new empty folder. This folder is temporary and can be deleted after you are done.
    3. Go to the temporary folder and run redists.msi
    4. Run the MSI at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Setup\XLiveRedist.msi
    5. Run the MSI at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Redist\XNA FX Redist\xnafx40_redist.msi
    6. Run the MSI at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Setup\xnaliveproxy.msi
    7. Run the MSI at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Setup\xnags_platform_tools.msi
    8. Run the MSI at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Setup\xnags_shared.msi
    9. Copy folder XNA Game Studio 4.0 provided in the zip file you downloaded at the start to C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft
    10. Go to the temporary folder you extracted to in step 2 and run the MSI named arpentry.msi
    11. Open a cmd window and run “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\devenv.exe” /setup
    12. Delete the temporary folder you created, as well as the zip file and the folder you extracted that to. You don’t need those any more.
    13. Create some awesome games using XNA!

    Additional resources

    Visual Studio Professional 2013 https://www.dreamspark.com/Product/Product.aspx?productid=72

    Visual Studio Professional 2012 https://www.dreamspark.com/Product/Product.aspx?productid=44

    Visual Studio Professional 2010 https://www.dreamspark.com/Product/Product.aspx?productid=4

    MonoGame for taking existing XNA Games and Apps to Windows 8 – http://www.monogame.net

    XNA Game Studio - https://www.dreamspark.com/Product/Product.aspx?productid=3

    Getting Started creating Xbox Indie XNA Games - http://www.slideshare.net/lee_stott/xbox-indie-account-via-xna-creators-club-for-all-students

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Microsoft Training and Certification Guide

    • 4 Comments

    We have just released a new Training & Certification Guide app into the Windows 8 store

    clip_image002

    The app is a great tool for student, educators and professionals for evaluating which technical courses and certifications should be completed to gain Microsoft Professional Certifications.

    Screen shot 1

    Available here:

    http://apps.microsoft.com/webpdp/app/cebcb8be-d6c0-48dd-bace-1a916f3f5f12

    The Training and Certification Guide features an interactive chart of our technical certifications mapped by courseware and exam. Clicking on the ‘subway map’ takes a user to more information on the different portfolios—details about the training, certifications, etc. Clicking further will then take users to /learning. A breakdown of keyword guidance is also included to map keywords to our certifications.

    The app also includes a ‘view as PDF’ option should users need to print pages.

    Wishing you a happy professional certification journey.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Choosing the right cross-platform mobile framework

    • 4 Comments

    Last week I had the pleasure of speaking to a few hundred people at  Apps World on a session entitled Cross Platform Panel: Exploring Methodologies & Tools.

    This is a fascinating area as today’s modern app developers are now ultimately having to become more agile in their abilities and use the best tools available to develop an app for as many platforms as possible within a shortest period of time to maximise the revenue their app or game can achieve.

    However having to develop an application or game for a diverse range of mobile platforms iOS, Android, Windows Phone etc.. has a number of constraints which need to be taken into consideration for example  each have their own ‘native’ development languages, UI/UX, developer tools and environments.

    But for the modern developer there is an ever growing list of cross-platform frameworks that allow you to minimise the cost and effort of developing mobile apps, but which to choose?

    So what Cross Platform Frameworks are available?

    Here is a list of some of the most common cross platform frameworks available for today’s mobile app builders.

    AIR

    The Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) is a cross-platform runtime for iOS and Android. It allows you to develop using ActionScript (a objected-oriented, strongly typed relative of JavaScript) by providing the Flash Player virtual machine to abstract away from the underlying hardware, with an extended API available to access device capabilities such as GPS and camera. Furthermore, this allows developers to use the Apache Flex enterprise application framework which provides its own UI components (and an associated UI framework), data binding, advanced data structures and other essential utilities. Flex also introduces the MXML language for the declarative creation of user interfaces.

    Enyo

    Enyo is a free and open source (Apache 2.0 license) cross-platform and cross-browser application development framework that enables developers to create HTML5 applications and deploy them to many modern desktop browsers and mobile devices.

    Enyo is built around the philosophy of fully-encapsulated components, which allow a developer to reuse component pieces (or even an entire application) in new or existing projects. It is possible to embed full Enyo applications in the DOM elements of existing Web pages.

    Enyo does not use templating, instead enyo.Controls (a kind of enyo.Component) render themselves into the DOM based on their owner/parent hierarchy in the application structure. Developers design the application structure/component with JavaScript object literals, adding methods and properties for functionality.

    Enyo has a dependency mechanism (package.js) to enable a basic modular approach to building applications. If you look at most Enyo projects, you will see references to a $lib directory in one or more package.js files, usually to include optional modules such as Layout (lists and responsive components) and Onyx (a widget library).

    Intel App Framework

    Intel App Framework is a framework for building cross-platform mobile application using HTML5 technologies. The framework started life as jqMobi, a mobile optimised version of jQuery, which was created by the team behind appMobi. Intel acquired the jqMobi tools and staff in February 2013.

    Intel App Framework is free and open sourced under an MIT licence. Intel also offer XDK, which is a a full suite of tools built around the App Framework. XDK adds an IDE, build tools and an emulator.

    Along with its lightweight JavaScript library, Intel App Framework provides a basic MVC framework and many UI components. Rather than mimicking the native look and feel, the framework has opted for providing its own styles which looks the same across all platforms. Styles can be customised using the framework Style Builder

    jQTouch

    jQTouch is a Zepto/jQuery plugin which provides a framework for developing iOS and Android applications. It is both open source and free to use.

    jQTouch provides a structure on which to base the HTML, the majority of the application styling, page transition animations and touch based event handling; however, it’s not a fully featured application development solution.


    jQuery Mobile

    jQuery Mobile is a HTML5 framework which makes it easy to create websites that mimic the iOS look and feel. This is achieved by providing HTML that is marked up with various jQuery Mobile specific attributes, which is then processed to generate the final markup. Within PropertyCross jQuery Mobile is combined with KnockoutJS, which provides a presentation model (MVVM), RequireJS, for dependency management, and Cordova / PhoneGap, which packages the HTML / JavaScript within a native wrapper for app-store deployment. Cordova also provides a set of APIs for accessing native phone functionalities which are not available via HTML specifications.

    The JavaScript Model and ViewModel code is shared across all mobile platforms, whereas the HTML files, which make up the View, are specific for each platform. This allows the UI for each platform to be tailored to the requirements of each platform.

    iOS version uses the out-of-the-box jQuery Mobile styles

    Windows Phone uses the jquery-metro-theme extensions to support the Windows UI style together with Windows Phone specific features such as the app-bar.

    Kendo UI

    Kendo provide a suite of web development frameworks, all of which are built on top of the ‘core’ Kendo UI MVVM framework. The Kendo UI Mobile framework adds a set of UI widgets for the creation of mobile interfaces. The mobile framework has a look and feel that mimics the native Apple, Android and Windows Phone themes.

    Lungo

    Lungo is a framework for developing cross-platform applications in HTML5. Lungo applications are run in the browser, similar to other HTML-based frameworks such as jQuery Mobile. Lungo provides 2 main workflows:

    Lungo provides a rich set of classes to help decorate basic HTML5 markup. The markup is then given behaviour and interaction based on the structure by Lungo, without any developer code being required. Lungo’s philosophy is that you should be able to create a prototype of your application to show basic interaction and page flow without having to write any JS yourself.

    Lungo also provides a JS API to interact and enhance the prototype. The Lungo API is similar to the common functionality you’d see in other mobile frameworks, such as DOM manipulation (through Quo.js), page routing and navigation, storage etc.

    mgwt

    Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is an open source set of tools that allows developers to create web apps in Java. GWT compiles Java into an optimised JavaScript application. GWT is most often used for large-scale web applications, with the strongly typed nature of Java making it easier to maintain a large codebase.

    mgwt is an open source mobile widget framework build using GWT. mgwt provides a number of UI widgets, CSS styles and a PhoneGap API which make it easier to develop native-like applications using GWT.

    PhoneJS

    PhoneJS is a commercial HTML5 framework for cross platform mobile application development from DevExpress. PhoneJS is free for non-commercial use.

    PhoneJS uses the Knockout MVVM framework for structuring the application, with the PhoneJS CSS providing a native-styled UI for the various phone platforms. PhoneJS applications use PhoneGap for packaging.

    DevExpress also offers a more integrated solution based on PhoneJS, called DXTREME Mobile, which adds Visual Studio tooling.

    RhoMobile

    RhoMobile Suite is an integrated set of tools, created by Motorola Solutions, for building cross-platform mobile application using HTML5, JavaScript and Ruby. RhoMobile is made available under an MIT licence. Applications are developed using RhoStudio which is an Eclipse-based IDE. During development, applications can be tested using the built-in RhoSimulator, which is a Webkit-based browser, or a platform specific simulator. Building RhoMobile applications for Windows Phone, iOS or Android relies on the presence of the native SDKs.

    RhoMobile applications follow the MVC pattern, with the application UI defined in HTML (with jQuery Mobile being used to style the output). Application logic can be programmed in either JavaScript or Ruby.

    Sencha Touch 2

    Sencha Touch is a framework for building cross-platform mobile application using HTML5 technologies. Similar to ExtJS, Sencha Touch provides a fully functional JavaScript API and a structured MVC approach for building mobile applications. Coding is done (almost!) exclusively in JavaScript - with the majority of the HTML and CSS being abstracted away behind the concept of “components”, which are configured and generated by the JavaScript code.

    Titanium  

    Appcelerator Titanium is a JavaScript-based development platform for iOS and Android development. The JavaScript code runs on the device within an interpreter, and the UI for a Titanium application is entirely native. Titanium development uses the Titanium Studio IDE, and depending on your OS, the Android SDKs and Xcode are also required.

    The

    Titanium APIs provide an abstraction layer for the Android and iOS UI elements, allowing you to write your view code against the Titanium abstraction. Although, there are some view concepts which have not been abstracted, meaning that developers have to write platform specific view code

    Xamarin

    Xamarin have two commercial products, Xamarin.iOS for iOS development and Xamarin.Android. The Xamarin frameworks allow you to write applications using C# and the .NET framework. For each platform Xamarin provide bindings to the native platform APIs. As a result Xamarin applications make use of the native UI for each mobile platform. Xamarin do not provide a Windows Phone product because the C# and .NET code used for Android and iOS development is directly portable to Windows Phone.

    What resources are available to help evaluate which is the best solution?


    PropertyCross http://www.propertycross.com

    To help solve this problem PropertyCross presents a non-trivial application, for searching UK property listings, developed using a range of cross-platform technologies and frameworks. Property Cross has a simple aim is to provide developers with a practical insight into the strengths and weaknesses of each framework so this is a definite resource you should check out if your interested in cross platform development.

    Conclusion

    I would love to hear your experiences of developing apps and games for cross platform support and which tool you find the most useful?

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    • 4 Comments

    The Academic Search beta is a free search engine, developed by Microsoft Research, that helps users quickly find information about academic researchers and their activities. It is also a test-bed for our object-level vertical search research.

    With Academic Search, you can easily find top researchers and their papers, conferences, and journals. You can also find relationships between researchers who co-authored papers. Academic Search will be changing its name with the upcoming release of new and improved features. In the meantime, try Academic Search and explore more than 15 million publications.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Cloud Services SDK for Windows Phone 7 Beta

    • 4 Comments
    Wp7

    Project Hawaii Releases Cloud Services SDK for Windows Phone 7 Beta

    The MRC Engineering team, in collaboration with the newly formed Microsoft Mobile Computing Research Center (MCRC), has released the fourth and final cloud service for Windows Phone 7 development: Optical Character Recognition (OCR).

    This OCR service is the next step in the evolution of
    Project Hawaii, the Microsoft Research project that is exploring how to take full advantage of the cloud to enhance the use of smartphones.

    With Hawaii OCR, you can use your smartphone's camera to take a picture of an object that contains text (in Roman characters), send the image to the cloud, and in return receive a Unicode string of the text. This text string can be used in a number of interesting scenarios, such as translation of street signs or restaurant menus.

    Download the SDK and start building Windows Phone 7 apps today. For more details, read the Aloha: Text from the Cloud blog.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Hyper-V: List of SLAT-Capable CPUs for Hosts

    • 4 Comments

    HyperV

    With the announcement that you can run Hyper-V on the Windows 8 client. I have had a lot of  questions regarding this? I did do a post back in August explaining the process of checking your PC estate for SLAT Support see http://blogs.msdn.com/b/uk_faculty_connection/archive/2012/08/31/if-your-thinking-of-installing-windows-8-are-your-labs-machine-capable.aspx

    A number of people have reported simple having problems running Hyper-V on  a Windows 8 client as it requires SLAT to run Hyper-V.

    Running Hyper-V on Windows Server 2012 does *not* require SLAT but most institutions don't want to install a server OS as a desktop operating system.  SLAT is a feature of the CPU. It is called “Rapid Virtualization Indexing (RVI)”, and has been called Extended Page Tables (EPT) by Intel and Nested Page Tables (NPT) by AMD.

    You can use Wikipedia to  look up Intel Nehalem and AMD NPT:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Nehalem

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD-V_Nested_Paging

    Processors that support SLAT

    • Intel processors whose names start with 'i', e.g. i3, i5, i7, i9. (There may be exceptions, but I'm not aware of any.)
    • Any Intel CPUs based on Nehalem, Westmere, or Sandybridge micro-architectures. (There may be exceptions, but I'm not aware of any.)

    For AMD machines you can look up the supported models at http://support.amd.com/us/kbarticles/Pages/GPU120AMDRVICPUsHyperVWin8.aspx

    Tools for testing for SLAT

    Microsoft’s Mark Russinovich has also created a really nice utility coreinfo.exe  You can simply run coreinfo.ext and it will  detect EPT and NPT (SLAT) support on your CPU. 

    To test your machine, simply download coreinfo.exe from Microsoft Sysinternals http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/cc835722  and use the coreinfo -v switch to list the features. An asterisk * next to a feature indicates that it is supported. A minus sign - indicates no support for that feature.

    Note: Coreinfo must be executed on a system without a hypervisor running for accurate results and under a administrator account on Windows 8.


    For example here is a screenshot from my Lenovo X200 series tablet

    coreinfo

    “*” means the feature is present   

    “-“ means it is missing

    Alternatively, you can use Windows PowerShell to capture your specific CPU model this could be scripted to report the state of your entire PC labs or cluster estate the PowerShell command is gwmi win32_processor

     

    Powershell

     

    NOTE: Be sure to include the specific family/model/stepping since different processor revisions may have different feature sets.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Microsoft Surface Windows RT device Now available to pre order

    • 4 Comments

     

    Pre Order your Surface with Windows RT

     

    Surface with Windows RT    SurfaceRt Surface_Win_RT_side

     

     

    Who says that pretty can’t be practical?

    It’s time for a tablet that’s more than meets the eye. Powerful processing and beautiful design unite on Surface. Whether you’re working hard or hardly working, Surface’s integrated Kickstand and revolutionary Touch Cover let you work, play, and connect with others like never before. Plug into external displays like projectors and HDTV, and share your world1. Pre-loaded with Windows RT, Microsoft Office 2013 RT2, Xbox apps, and other essentials.

    Price

    64 GB with Black Touch Cover £559.00 incl. VAT

    32 GB with Black Touch Cover £479.00 incl. VAT

    32 GB without Black Touch Cover  £399.00 incl. VAT

    Your order will ship by October 26 and arrive by October 30.

    For more details and to order see http://www.microsoftstore.com/store/msuk/en_GB/pdp/productID.257929400?WT.mc_id=FY13WinHH

    Check out the Surface Your tube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/surface 

    Follow Surface on Twitter @surface

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Scirra Construct2 a tool for students to rapidly develop games for Windows 8

    • 4 Comments

    Guest blog by Andrew Wilson, Course Director, BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology, Birmingham City University

    image

    Introducing students to the processes of game development that is designing, prototyping, play testing and refining the original idea has to be fun and engaging. Many students joining game development courses such as ours at Birmingham City University have little exposure to programming and can be frustrated by not being able to develop their game ideas as quickly as they hoped.

    Therefore to complement the teaching of software development tools such as Microsoft XNA Game Studio, MonoGame or Unity3D we need tools where our students can quickly produce fun playable games and which they can learn very quickly.

    As an experiment in 2012 a group of first year students were asked to develop a mobile game based on a brief set by a local independent games studio Distorted Poetry. The students were allowed to use a tool of their choice as long as it was free and that they were comfortable with teaching it to themselves. Teaching other people is one of the best ways of learning and an approach we encourage and cultivate on the BSc Computer Games Technology course a skill that has rewarded several of our students with employment in local games studios.

    scirra-logo-01

    The 2012 teams predominately chose Scirra’s Construct2 as developing games in HTML5 was high on their agenda. Construct2 is a very nice tool to learn game development without the overhead of learning complex coding practises. Once the students mastered the environment they quickly developed game ideas within a few hours.

    Construct2 game Soul survivor developed by first year BCU Computer Games Technology students (2102)

    image

    This year’s first years were given the challenge of developing a Construct2 game for Microsoft’s Imagine Cup 2013. They have just completed their prototypes and are in the process of play-testing their games.

    Their ideas are clever and innovative and demonstrates how easy Construct2 is to learn and what is achievable with it

    image image

    First year Computer Games Technology (2013) prototypes for this year’s Microsoft Imagine Cup

    Deploying to different platforms has also been made incredible easy with the export function and can be published onto the Windows 8 App store which is available to students via dreamspark. A great addition that helps students develop their portfolio of published games which is very important for a career as a games developer.

    image image

    Usman Mohammad, a second year Computer Games Technology student, is working on a Birmingham City University Student Academic Partner Programme.

    image

    This scheme is a unique partnership involving the Students' Union and Birmingham City University. The scheme topped the 2010 Times Higher Education (THE) Awards in the ‘Outstanding Support for Students’ category. Usman is working on developing a workshop using Construct2 which can be used in our University’s outreach and master class programmes, where school and college students can have an introduction to games development and experience studying in our University.

    So well done to Scirra and we hope you keep producing such an excellent teaching tool.

  • Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

    Windows 8 Metro Style Gaming

    • 4 Comments

    Next week I will be at the Develop Conference, attending some of the 103 sessions, 5 keynotes, and on the Microsoft stand at the Expo. I’m looking forward to networking with the 1500 developers and 450 companies during the event and discussing the opportunity of developing Windows 8 Metro Style games.

    develop

    On http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh452780.aspx we list options for developing Windows 8 games.

    At present there are over 50 games available in the store using the above technologies, here are some good links to get started

    · Metro style app using JavaScript. You can use the established web technologies: HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to develop full-screen, chrome-free games.

    Slide2

    http://bit.ly/metroGamesJS

    · Metro style app using C++, C#, or Visual Basic and XAML. You can use managed code languages like C# and Visual Basic to develop 2D (and lightweight 3D) games. If you have developed in Silverlight for Internet Explorer or Windows Phone 7, this model will feel very familiar.

    Slide1

    http://bit.ly/metroGames

    · Metro style C++ with DirectX. You can develop both 2D and 3D games that effectively use the graphics processing horsepower on a range of Windows desktops and 3D-enabled Windows devices, from high powered gaming rigs to low power slates. It requires a strong working knowledge of Windows programming and native C/C++.

    Slide3

    http://bit.ly/metroGamesDX

    Tutorials

    C++/Direct3D

    There are a number of online tutorial around Marble Maze which is a DirectX game written in C++. This leads you to the more basic “Hello World” example over here although while the results of that example are “Hello World” in nature.

    There’s another, more realistic sample over here with a walk-through to build up a Metro style shooting game. It takes the form of a completed code sample and a walk through of what’s going on in that sample.

    It runs to around 40 source files.

    The key learning outcome for starting to build games for Metro are as follows as these would make excellent starting points for curricula development for Developing Metro Style Games.

    1) Understanding how a Metro style app gets on the screen – i.e. the infrastructure around IFrameworkViewSource and IFrameworkView.

    2) Understanding C++/CX which is a bunch of C++ extensions relatively familiar to people like me who’ve come from the C++/CLI world but a bit odd to a regular C++ developer.

    3) Understanding some of the technologies used like the Parallel Patterns Library (PPL) which our default templates throw at you.

    4) Understanding some of the C++ 11 techniques like lambdas which our default templates also throw at you.

    5) Understanding how a Metro style app is meant to work from the point of view of lifecycle management (i.e. suspend/resume/terminate).

    6) Understanding the WinRT APIs available and their main usage and purpose.

    Steps 5 & 6 are common to any Windows 8 Metro style app developer.

    JavaScript

    There is a JavaScript tutorial but the game involved is very, very basic.

    Frameworks

    As we are all aware, there are many game engines /frameworks (middleware) available. Some of these are already supporting development for Win 8 metro games whilst others are planning to support it within the coming months. I have listed the ones which are or have short terms plans to support W8 metro apps. I am sure that there will be more to come…

    Unity

    http://unity3d.com/

    A full games development tool/suite – physics, rendering, scripting, AI etc.

    Windows 8 Metro support:                         coming soon (for GA)

    Dev languages:                                                 (game scripting) C#, Javascript

    MonoGame

    http://monogame.codeplex.com/

    An Open Source, OpenGL implementation of the Microsoft XNA 4 Framework

    Windows 8 Metro support:                         coming soon (‘later this year’)

    Dev languages:                                                 C#/XNA

    SharpDX

    http://sharpdx.org/

    SharpDX is an open-source project delivering the full DirectX API under the .Net platform, allowing the development of high performance game, 2D and 3D graphics rendering as well as realtime sound application.

    Windows 8 Metro support:                         Now

    Dev languages:                                                 C#

Page 3 of 105 (1,047 items) 12345»