image 

Carla, from our Virtual Earth team, tells me that they have another free seminar coming up in March, where there’s a chance to get an overview of our web-based mapping solutions. I think this is probably going to be more useful for developers, and potentially some of the teaching staff, but there’s bound to be somebody out there that I didn’t think about that will find it relevant to a project. The day has a mainly technical slant, and there’s a session of tips for developers.

Here’s the details:

An Introduction to Microsoft Mapping Platforms

Friday 6th March – Microsoft, Thames Valley Park, Reading

The Microsoft Europe Virtual Earth team is holding a free one-day seminar to provide you with all the information you require to integrate online mapping into your website to create a user experience that will delight your users. Never before has it been so easy to track resources geographically, analyse information, manage a mobile population (14-19 anybody?), or map a wide range of different locations.

The agenda will consist of:

- An introduction and overview to Virtual Earth, helping to set the scene and agenda for the day.

- Informative sessions with a chance to hear from customers and partners who have utilised Virtual Earth as well as technical presentations and the latest updates from the team.

- A masterclass from Johannes Kebeck highlighting useful tips and tricks for developers, ensuring you get the most out of the Virtual Earth platform.

- An opportunity to network with other customers, partners and developers as well as members of the EMEA Virtual Earth team.

The day will run from 9.00am until 4.30pm.
Places are limited so if you do wish to register please do so by following this link (You’ll need Invitation Code: 5292A6)

You can also register by phone on 0870 166 6680 (The event reference number is 4015)

imageYou may get the chance to learn about some of the ways of creating map mashups too – like the way that University of California have added their own diagrammatic campus maps overlaid onto the satellite imagery. I can imagine all kinds of practical uses for this by a premises team, or even for mapping your network infrastructure.