Extract from Further Education Reimagined.

Younger generations (Y and Z) have very different values and ways of working to preceding generations. They value change, variety, excitement and diversity, and they actively seek new challenges. They are impatient and thrive on instant
gratification and feedback. They enjoy social networking and embrace people from different cultures and countries. They embrace virtual team working and multi-tasking. They value work-life balance and like technology to enable them to freely and seamlessly mix their private and work life.

The above preferences are clearly expressed in a recent survey of students:

They like to learn anywhere anytime, to be in control of their learning and to learn at their own pace.

They like social-based learning using e.g. text, chat, networking sites.

They like digitally rich content using e.g. video.

They like games (in learning) to make it easier to understand difficult concepts.


All the evidence across Gazelle colleges suggests that the expansion of cross-college enterprise competitions and a more applied approach to entrepreneurial learning methods deliver student motivation, student preference and improved retention. Coplin sees a parallel with the world of work, where technology can increase efficiency and cost saving in education but technology can also transform and disrupt. He argues that college leaders need to embrace both the efficiency and transformative nature of technology, blending with changes to pedagogy and curriculum to create a 21st century teaching and learning environment. The five key technologies most relevant to education are Cloud, Mobile, Social, Big Data and Gamification (games in learning) (more details in Note A - page 18). Each technology has significant value individually, but considered together, they have the ability to transform Further Education to meet the preferences of students and to deliver graduates who are ready for the new world of work as shown in Figure 1.

image

Figure 1 - The five key technologies and their potential to transform further education


Cross-college enterprise competitions and a more applied approach to entrepreneurial learning methods deliver student motivation, student preference and improved retention.

Coplin sees a parallel with the world of work, where technology can increase efficiency and cost saving in education but technology can also transform and disrupt. He argues that college leaders need to embrace both the efficiency and
transformative nature of technology, blending with changes to pedagogy and curriculum to create a 21st century teaching and learning environment. The five key technologies most relevant to education are Cloud, Mobile, Social, Big Data
and Gamification (games in learning) (more details in Note A - page 18). Each technology has significant value individually, but considered together, they have the ability to transform Further Education to meet the preferences of students and to deliver graduates who are ready for the new world of work as shown in Figure 1.

Download the rest of the free ebook – FE Reimagined